Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Lynch

Paul Lynch

Chef, FireLake Grill House, Radisson Plaza Hotel, Minneapolis

While phrases such as “farm-to-table” and “locally sourced” are common in today's culinary lexicon, they've been part of a philosophy Chef Paul Lynch has employed since he first set foot in a professional kitchen nearly 40 years ago. With his extensive restaurant and hospitality industry experience, Chef Lynch, who is a Texas native has worked around the country, including in his home state of Texas, Vermont, California, Hawaii, and Minnesota. In each location he's embraced and executed the local cuisine, from regional influences to utilizing local purveyors. “My food has always been a representation of the foods of a region,” he says. “I've always felt it was important to deliver a taste of place, especially in a hotel restaurant. When people travel, they want to say they had a unique experience, and nothing defines a region or culture like its food.” That point of view has served Chef Lynch well in his career, which has seen him run kitchens in hotels including the Four Seasons, the Westin, and the Radisson Plaza Hotel in Minneapolis, home to FireLake Grill House & Cocktail Bar, which opens its second location at the new Radisson Blu Mall of America in March 2013. Chef Lynch assumed the executive chef role for the kitchens at the Radisson Plaza Hotel in Minneapolis in 1999. In addition to putting Lynch at the helm of the hotel's $6 million food and beverage operations, Carlson (now Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group) gave him free reign to create a restaurant that truly served the area. The result is FireLake, which Chef Lynch describes as, “a restaurant about the flavors of real burning wood from the land of 10,000 lakes.” Although he's not technically a native Minnesotan, Chef Lynch understands the food of the North Country as well as anyone, citing influences from the area's Scandinavian, German, and Irish populations. He also pioneered using local products, preferring to purchase game from family-owned establishments, cook with only freshwater seafood, and use ingredients such as locally-harvested grains and wild rice that have long been a source of nourishment for Midwesterners. “It's about taking these ingredients, understanding them, and applying them in modern style,” Chef Lynch says. His commitment to the local food industry extends outside of the kitchen. Chef Lynch is a founding member of Minnesota's Heartland Food Network and is currently collaborating to establish a chapter of the Chef's Collaborative in the twin cities, a group of chefs and purveyors that promote products from the heartland and help make them more available. In 2006 Chef Lynch was honored as a Carlson Fellow; Carlson's highest award, “for creativity and Innovation. In 2008, he took FireLake to the culinary capital of New York City, presenting his Midwestern-rooted cuisine at the James Beard House.

Mr. Lynch can be contacted at 612-339-4900 or paul.lynch@radisson.com

Coming up in February 2020...

Social Media: Social Listening Tools

The reach and influence of social media is staggering. Nearly 3 billion people use social media daily, posting a range of messages, selfies, images, and everything in-between. According to HubSpot, almost 4 million posts are uploaded to the major social networks every single minute! That's an astounding amount of content and it is crucial for hotels to skillfully use social media in order to effectively compete. From establishing a suitable brand identity and voice to creating content across all the major networks (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, etc.), the goal is to actively engage consumers and to eventually convert them to customers. Some hotels are initiating online contests as a way to attract new customers, while others are rewarding customers with discounts who subscribe to the their email lists or follow their social media pages. Another recent strategy is to employ social media listening tools that track what people are posting online about their businesses. These tools allow hotels to monitor - or listen to - what's being said about a brand across the entire social web, and this can prove to be very valuable, unfiltered information. Social listening permits hotels to be aware of people's opinions about their business, industry or competitors, and some of these tools even listen beyond social media platforms. They also monitor publicly available information on blogs, forums, news outlets and websites. Some listening tools are more focused on gathering and analyzing data, while others offer more engagement-oriented features, which allow hotels to interact with people right from the platform. Often the information that is gleaned from these listening tools ends up being the most authentic, unbiased insights a business can get. The February Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to successfully integrate social media strategies into their operations.