Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Lynch

Paul Lynch

Chef, FireLake Grill House, Radisson Plaza Hotel, Minneapolis

While phrases such as “farm-to-table” and “locally sourced” are common in today's culinary lexicon, they've been part of a philosophy Chef Paul Lynch has employed since he first set foot in a professional kitchen nearly 40 years ago. With his extensive restaurant and hospitality industry experience, Chef Lynch, who is a Texas native has worked around the country, including in his home state of Texas, Vermont, California, Hawaii, and Minnesota. In each location he's embraced and executed the local cuisine, from regional influences to utilizing local purveyors. “My food has always been a representation of the foods of a region,” he says. “I've always felt it was important to deliver a taste of place, especially in a hotel restaurant. When people travel, they want to say they had a unique experience, and nothing defines a region or culture like its food.” That point of view has served Chef Lynch well in his career, which has seen him run kitchens in hotels including the Four Seasons, the Westin, and the Radisson Plaza Hotel in Minneapolis, home to FireLake Grill House & Cocktail Bar, which opens its second location at the new Radisson Blu Mall of America in March 2013. Chef Lynch assumed the executive chef role for the kitchens at the Radisson Plaza Hotel in Minneapolis in 1999. In addition to putting Lynch at the helm of the hotel's $6 million food and beverage operations, Carlson (now Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group) gave him free reign to create a restaurant that truly served the area. The result is FireLake, which Chef Lynch describes as, “a restaurant about the flavors of real burning wood from the land of 10,000 lakes.” Although he's not technically a native Minnesotan, Chef Lynch understands the food of the North Country as well as anyone, citing influences from the area's Scandinavian, German, and Irish populations. He also pioneered using local products, preferring to purchase game from family-owned establishments, cook with only freshwater seafood, and use ingredients such as locally-harvested grains and wild rice that have long been a source of nourishment for Midwesterners. “It's about taking these ingredients, understanding them, and applying them in modern style,” Chef Lynch says. His commitment to the local food industry extends outside of the kitchen. Chef Lynch is a founding member of Minnesota's Heartland Food Network and is currently collaborating to establish a chapter of the Chef's Collaborative in the twin cities, a group of chefs and purveyors that promote products from the heartland and help make them more available. In 2006 Chef Lynch was honored as a Carlson Fellow; Carlson's highest award, “for creativity and Innovation. In 2008, he took FireLake to the culinary capital of New York City, presenting his Midwestern-rooted cuisine at the James Beard House.

Mr. Lynch can be contacted at 612-339-4900 or paul.lynch@radisson.com

Coming up in March 2019...

Human Resources: An Era of Transition

Traditionally, the human resource department administers five key areas within a hotel operation - compliance, compensation and benefits, organizational dynamics, selection and retention, and training and development. However, HR professionals are also presently involved in culture-building activities, as well as implementing new employee on-boarding practices and engagement initiatives. As a result, HR professionals have been elevated to senior leadership status, creating value and profit within their organization. Still, they continue to face some intractable issues, including a shrinking talent pool and the need to recruit top-notch employees who are empowered to provide outstanding customer service. In order to attract top-tier talent, one option is to take advantage of recruitment opportunities offered through colleges and universities, especially if they have a hospitality major. This pool of prospective employees is likely to be better educated and more enthusiastic than walk-in hires. Also, once hired, there could be additional training and development opportunities that stem from an association with a college or university. Continuing education courses, business conferences, seminars and online instruction - all can be a valuable source of employee development opportunities. In addition to meeting recruitment demands in the present, HR professionals must also be forward-thinking, anticipating the skills that will be needed in the future to meet guest expectations. One such skill that is becoming increasingly valued is “resilience”, the ability to “go with the flow” and not become overwhelmed by the disruptive influences  of change and reinvention. In an era of transition—new technologies, expanding markets, consolidation of brands and businesses, and modifications in people's values and lifestyles - the capacity to remain flexible, nimble and resilient is a valuable skill to possess. The March Hotel Business Review will examine some of the strategies that HR professionals are employing to ensure that their hotel operations continue to thrive.