Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Rogg

Kyle Rogg

President & COO, Value Place

Kyle Rogg is Value Place's President and Chief Operating Officer and is responsible for the operating performance of each of Value Place's divisions including Value Place Franchise Services (VPFS), Value Place Property Management (VPPM) and the 44 Value Place company‐owned properties. Value Place's 185 franchised and company-owned properties make it the largest economy extended‐stay brand in America. VPPM is one of many high‐quality property management companies which serve Value Place's fifty franchise groups. Jack DeBoer, Value Place's founder and Chairman, added Mr. Rogg and CEO Dan Weber to Value Place's executive leadership team in 2011, to drive Value Place's next phase of franchise and company property growth. Prior to Value Place, Mr. Rogg spent 15 years at CLC Lodging (formerly Corporate Lodging Consultants), the nation's largest negotiator and payment processor of workforce lodging rates, most recently as Senior Vice President of Business Development. Mr. Rogg led the development of the company's SMB business line, expanding CLC's customer base from 200 to 50,000 companies, charitable organizations and governmental entities and was a member of the private‐equity backed leadership team, which sold CLC to Fleetcor Technologies in 2009. Mr. Rogg is a graduate of Friends University and holds a Master of Business Administration from the University of Kansas. Founded in 2002, Value Place is the largest economy extended-stay lodging brand in the U.S. Featuring remarkably affordable weekly rates, rigorous cleanliness standards and secure temporary lodging, the brand delivers an unparalleled commitment to the comfort, privacy, and peace of mind of each guest. Value Place currently has 185 locations open in 32 states, providing extended-stay accommodations that are clean, safe, simple, and affordable.

Mr. Rogg can be contacted at 316-631-1370 or franchise@valueplace.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.