Editorial Board   

Ms. Ross

Susie Ross

Founder, Waiter Training

Susie founded Waiter Training when she realized that restaurants might be able to utilize her extensive background in successful sales in the restaurant industry and as an instructor. She obtained her degree in Speech/Communications with an emphasis in Theatre, from Metropolitan State College of Denver and made a successful career of selling and serving food and beverages in the restaurant industry. Her background in the restaurant business runs the gamut from fast-paced, breakfast and lunch service to a more formal, evening and dinner atmosphere and spans nearly 15 years. Building confidence in both experienced and inexperienced staff has become her trademark. Susie believes servers must approach the table with confidence and an ability to sell the menu, irrespective of the type of restaurant. Classes are conducted with fun in mind. It has been proven that people of all ages learn better when there is fun, laughter and games involved in the learning process. Susie brings fun and creativity to her sales-oriented approach to serving guests in a restaurant.

Ms. Ross can be contacted at 720-203-4615 or susan@waiter-training.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.