Library Archives

 
Larry Mogelonsky

Weddings are often viewed as an orphan kid of our industry, and special attention to this stream is only given at a narrow set of dedicated properties. Lest I remind you, however, that weddings are 'recession proof' whereby every bride wants her day to be as immaculate as possible. But it takes time and commitment to develop a successful weddings program, and to this end there's no better place to look for inspiration then a five-star, five-diamond hotel with a stellar reputation in this arena. Read on...

Janet Gerhard

Would you meet up with a fellow passenger from your flight to New Orleans at Cafe du Monde? Or leave a couple of women from a cleaning service in your house alone if you only just met then a half an hour before? How do you feel about leaving your cellphone at an airport charging station unattended? Yes, I've done all these things plus many more that some may call naïve or downright boneheaded, but I have always had a high level of trust in the strangers I meet every day. It's served me well for four decades, but how is trust changing in the modern world? Read on...

Bernard Perrine

Through customer reviews and social media chatter, hotels have online reputations. While many owners and managers view this as a hassle, guest input is actually a gold mine, both for fixing service issues and learning about potential product additions that can provide new revenue streams. Hotels that address problems customers raise in cyberspace also outperform those that don't. We offer a guide to turning clientele comments into better service.This article will examine how managers should deal with online feedback, both positive and negative, and will look at how they can turn constructive criticism into better guest service. Read on...

Tema Frank

The best way for a hotel to thrive is by really understanding its customers and what they really want. We make too many assumptions about what our customers want and how they interpret our marketing and services. Kodak, for example, buried its own invention of a digital camera because it thought customers wanted printed pictures. Far too late they realized that what customers really wanted was a convenient way to capture and revisit special moments. It didn't have to be print. This article shows ways you can use market research and tools like personas to identify, understand and successfully cater to your ideal customers. Read on...

Bonnie Knutson

A current "hot term" in digital marketing is engagement. Everyone wants to engage their customers through their online content. The trouble is that most businesses, hotels included, are still trying to find their way in making this happen because, engaging customers via electronic media is still more art than science. This article will explore five "best blogging" tips for engaging customers/guests. Read on...

Jeff Catlin

Twenty years ago people chose hotels through travel agencies, word-of-mouth reviews, or simply driving by and stopping at the first clean-looking motel they spotted. Today, the rise of the smartphone and advent of online review websites like TripAdvisor marks a crucial paradigm shift in how average consumers make their travel arrangements. The Internet has given every consumer a voice — a voice that may love or loathe your product. Time and time again in articles, op-eds, and essays published in thought-leading websites and journals, hospitality experts agree: customer satisfaction should be a hotelier's number one priority, and that this is best achieved through better listening to your guests. Read on...

Simon Hudson

The lines between business and leisure travel are becoming increasingly blurred. Fueled by the proliferation of mobile devices and the ability to stay connected, over half of business travelers now extend their business trips into leisure trips. This presents new opportunities for hotels, but they need to configure their services to be flexible. Conference and meeting planners also have to be cognizant of these changes, ensuring that they incorporate an element of leisure when they plan their meetings. This article will focus on hotels around the world that are responding to the blurring of business and leisure travel. Read on...

Marcus Nicolls

Too many leaders rush to the idea that just one more perk, one more raise or one more break-room game table would boost employee engagement. This thinking is flawed—that "more" might produce a bump in engagement scores. Reality check, here. These quick-hit, feel-good tactics do not produce long-term, sustainable engagement. With the latest Gallup data revealing that employee engagement scores are currently less than 32%—worse still, nearly 1 in 5 acknowledge that they are "actively disengaged"—there has never been greater urgency and need for leaders everywhere to think and act differently in order to engage their people. As a leader in the hospitality industry, what are your plans to stir up positive employee engagement in your organization? Read on...

Lewis Fein

Hotel executives offer guests many things, from the ordinary to the extraordinary, in an effort to showcase a property's locale or a resort's accommodations. They invest in technology and security, as well as convenience and privacy. But the one thing every hotelier can highlight - the one concept that does not require consultants, engineers, designers and approval from various boards of directors - is family-friendly fun. That commodity is a matter of will, not money, where a hotel appeals to parents and children alike. The rewards can be substantial because there is something for everyone. That is a hotel executive's ideal scenario. Read on...

Tema Frank

A "hot term" in digital marketing is engagement. Everyone wants to engage their customers through their online content. But most businesses, hotels included, are still trying to find their way in making this happen because engaging customers via electronic media is still more art than science. Engagement is one of those terms that has been absconded by marketers with everyone knowing what it is but no one can define what it means. When I think about engagement, Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart's legendary phrase pops into my mind: "I know it when I see it," because its meaning is subjective and lacks a clearly defined meaning. This article will explore five "best blogging" tips for engaging customers/guests. Read on...

Simon Hudson

This article discusses the growing market for accessible tourism and the opportunity it represents for the hotel sector. The article focuses on one hotel chain in particular - Scandic - that has positioned itself as a world leader in accommodating visitors with disabilities. With 230 hotels spread across Europe, Scandic is the Nordic region's leading hotel chain. In 2003, it drew up an accessibility standard as a platform for all accessibility work at every hotel. Such a proactive approach has given Scandic a competitive advantage in the hotel sector. Read on...

Leora Halpern Lanz

With the powerful travel influence of the millennial generation as well as the ever-growing needs of today's geo-traveler, the popularity of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is increasingly important in the arena of hospitality. While various luxury brands and independent resorts have, over the last few years, implemented their own elementary degree of CSR programs (in which employees can partake or even the guest), today we are witnessing hospitality assets implementing interesting programs to further elevate their CSR practices into services or amenities. Hotels and brands need not spend considerable investments to implement wellness and sustainable practices into everyday operations. Read on...

Larry Mogelonsky

As a pillar of any hotel operation, guest service requires constant attention to ensure that its delivery exceeds current guest expectations. At its core, though, guest service comes down to your staff and the willingness of each team member to deliver his or her very best in all work duties. The proper intrinsic motivations are required to attain his level of perfection. In order to promote a corporate culture with this mentality, hoteliers must appeal to each employee's sense of actualization and their internal need to derive personal success from helping guests in whichever way is required. Read on...

Paul Johns

As social customer service matures to become one of the main customer service channels guests are using today, engaging with customers on social media is a main priority for companies in the hotel industry. As hotels are becoming more and more innovative in terms of technology and mobile access, guests now turn to channels like Facebook and Twitter first when complaining in real time, about a travel and lodging issue. Below outlines how hotels can maximize the benefits of social customer service, as they show guests that customer engagement and guest experience is their number one priority. Read on...

Marco Albarran

The topic of using employees to shop the competition discusses a practice that we have performed before successfully and that only a few establishments (which we know of) have dared to try. Needless to say, they have also been successful, thereby achieving a great return on their investment. Interestingly, I posted a couple of discussions on this topic on many of my Linked In hospitality groups, to find out if this is a project of interest and/or if they currently (or in the past) do/done this. The responses so far, are without a doubt, have been the most active and continuous I have seen from any of my other topic discussions so far. That said it is with great privilege that I write and share this wonderful and useful idea... Read on...

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Coming up in May 2019...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Corporate Social Responsibility

The hotel industry has undertaken a long-term effort to build more responsible and socially conscious businesses. What began with small efforts to reduce waste - such as paperless checkouts and refillable soap dispensers - has evolved into an international movement toward implementing sustainable development practices. In addition to establishing themselves as good corporate citizens, adopting eco-friendly practices is sound business for hotels. According to a recent report from Deloitte, 95% of business travelers believe the hotel industry should be undertaking “green” initiatives, and Millennials are twice as likely to support brands with strong management of environmental and social issues. Given these conclusions, hotels are continuing to innovate in the areas of environmental sustainability. For example, one leading hotel chain has designed special elevators that collect kinetic energy from the moving lift and in the process, they have reduced their energy consumption by 50%  over conventional elevators. Also, they installed an advanced air conditioning system which employs a magnetic mechanical system that makes them more energy efficient. Other hotels are installing Intelligent Building Systems which monitor and control temperatures in rooms, common areas and swimming pools, as well as ventilation and cold water systems. Some hotels are installing Electric Vehicle charging stations, planting rooftop gardens, implementing stringent recycling programs, and insisting on the use of biodegradable materials. Another trend is the creation of Green Teams within a hotel's operation that are tasked to implement earth-friendly practices and manage budgets for green projects. Some hotels have even gone so far as to curtail or eliminate room service, believing that keeping the kitchen open 24/7 isn't terribly sustainable. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.