Library Archives

 
Robert Post

The U.S. hotel industry has experienced 10 years of unprecedented growth. While not as strong as previous years, 2019 was still a healthy year. However, economists and experts agree it may be time to tighten our belts and prepare for a slowdown. Economic indicators that analysts commonly use to make predictions are mixed, making it difficult to predict the exact timing or the severity of a downturn. The Hospitality industry will be impacted as always by a slowing economy. Experienced Hospitality professionals know they can minimize economic disruption to a Hotel in difficult times by developing a foundation of reliable group business… Read on...

Jeff Hart

Jeff Hart, General Manager of the Los Angeles Airport Marriott explores airport hotels and their unique advantage to meetings and events. Hart discusses tactical tips and strategies that airport properties can take to stand out as a premier event destination. From challenges to opportunities, Hart gives a 360-degree look at the unique ways in which travel hubs can bring a destination to life and tell a story to potential clients that extends beyond near convenience and proximity to the airport. According to Hart and the team at the Los Angeles Airport Marriott, airport hotels are raising the bar, and now is the time for properties to look at the ways (small or large) in which they can level up their spaces, offerings and approach. Read on...

Robert Post

Knowland CEO Robert Post responds to recent articles/opinions that the $50 million investment by Marriott, IHG, Accor, and Hilton in a new Group Booking Platform has signaled "meaningful change" in the painful process of selling event space and room blocks to meeting planners. The new booking platform uses a self-reporting database of hotel group block inventory and meeting space to offer meeting planners an OTA-like environment to shop and book event venues at the lowest price. Read on...

Diane Tighe

Wellness is an essential component for planners to incorporate into their 2019 meetings and events, focusing on the complete physical, mental and social well-being of their attendees. The top meeting trend prediction comes as the theme of wellness grows rapidly on a global scale. Diane Tighe of Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club and JB Duke Hotel on the campus of Duke University shares recommendations for physical, mental and social wellness for planners to incorporate in 2019. With nearly 20 years of experience, Diane is a Certified Professional Catering Executive (CPCE) and an active member of NACE since 2001. Read on...

Ron Shah

Airbnb and home sharing has irreversibly impacted consumer leisure travel around the world. Put simply, vacation travelers have changed their preferences. They want to crack open the windows, save some money, and live like a local, and this trend is only accelerating. While hotels have been able to keep high occupancy rates for now, ADRs and profitability have suffered as a result, and there is no offset in sight. Read on...

David Lund

If your hotel has a reasonable amount of meeting space (+10,000 ft) and your banquet business is a significant contributor in your Food and Beverage Department (+20% of F&B revenue), you are going to want to separate local banquet business from group banquet business on all of your financial statements, forecasts, budgets and daily reporting. At this moment you may be asking, "Why would I want to do that? That sounds like a lot of work." There are some very good reasons to make this practice a standard in your hotel. I see many hotel financial statements and most are missing the boat because they do not separate group and local banquet revenues. Separating this reporting and setting it up properly provides powerful information you can use in your hotel to make better decisions and ultimately be more profitable. Read on...

Brett Ellison

With the annual chaos and excitement of the NCAA Tournament upon us once again, this is a good time to take a closer look at how hotel professionals manage high-volume external events. From concerts to conferences, and festivals to big games, the unique challenges of high-volume special events can put a strain on even the most well run and accommodating hotel property. Read on...

Julian Jost

What is it exactly that millennials want? For hotels, this question is more pertinent than ever as Generation Y becomes the largest share of the American workforce. As millennials take more positions as meeting planners, our focus should shift to how to incorporate millennial meeting trends and keep hotel meeting spaces on the cusp of innovation and competition. Mr. Beaubien made a great step towards answering that question in his article on "The Rise of Generation C and Small Meetings," featured on Hotel Executive. In his answer, he focused mainly on technological aspects like online bookability and payment options. From the experience I have with Spacebase, an online booking platform for unique meeting and workshop venues, I can confirm this 100%. Our customer base is mainly young and part of Generation Y. Read on...

Rob Scypinski

Hilton released a survey that asked meeting attendees in the United States, United Kingdom and Germany about their productivity, exercise and diet habits while at hotel meetings. We found that business indeed takes a dive around 2 p.m., and in addition to the afternoon slump, there's a number of other issues that detract from meeting productivity and attendee satisfaction. More than half of meeting attendees pay attention to what they eat and how they exercise in their daily lives, but most were unsatisfied with the ability to maintain this lifestyle while attending meetings at hotels. These meetings aren't just unproductive, they're draining an organization's bottom line. Read on...

Sandy Heydt

Like many other industries, 2016 is a big year for reflection on past and current trends among the meetings and conventions sector, ultimately yielding numerous progressive changes among the way meetings are planned, held and eventually evaluated by meeting hosts and attendees. Meeting hosts are expecting higher attendance and engagement rates, a more efficient use of technology and creative ways to position the meeting as an interactive experience verses a traditional presentation-style event that ultimately maintains a cost-effective price point. To satisfy growing client expectations, meeting planners are expecting more from meeting, convention and event venues. Read on...

David Ashen

Imagine a hotel meeting space that you'd walk into a decade or two ago. Do you see a 3,000-to-5,000-square-foot ballroom designed to seat hundreds of people, along with a patterned carpet and crystal chandeliers? Partitioned walls that subdivide the room to create secondary meeting spaces for smaller events and meetings? Do you conjure up an image of a boardroom for a dozen or two executives, with the requisite large oval table and leather chairs? A vanilla pre-function room for registration before an event and maybe a cocktail after? Read on...

Deborah Popely

The growth of China's hospitality and tourism industry has been well documented and predictions are that it will soon rival many other popular destinations. Less well-known is the role that the Meetings, Incentives, Conventions and Expositions (MICE) industry is playing in that growth. This article discusses how the MICE industry is fueling hospitality sector growth, especially in China's smaller cities and resort areas, and the factors that will determine whether this growth is sustainable. Read on...

David Muller

Making that road show a permanent fixture within a hotel should be as important as creating the exhibit in the first place because the hotel writ mobile and interactive - with its menagerie of decorative and mechanized birds and giraffes, and the choreographed locomotion of a wintertime scene of holiday revelry centered around a incandescent spruce - is a statement of purpose and a reminder, to visitors and staff alike, that a hotel - your hotel - has a story to tell. Read on...

Stephen J. Renard

When the second World War ended West Berlin was an island surrounded by East Germany. In order to help stabilize and make West Berlin self-sufficient (as they were afraid it would be taken over by the Russians) the Berlin Government supported by West European countries `decided in 1965 to start discussions about an overseas import trade show. The ITB means "International Tourist Exchange". Read on...

Julie Pingston

A recent meeting planner survey conducted by the Event Service Professionals Association (ESPA) reveals that meeting planners view event services managers (ESM) as trusted and valued partners. This sentiment holds true for first-time meetings and events as well as booking repeat business at hotels, convention centers and convention and visitors bureaus. Read on...

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Coming up in February 2020...

Social Media: Social Listening Tools

The reach and influence of social media is staggering. Nearly 3 billion people use social media daily, posting a range of messages, selfies, images, and everything in-between. According to HubSpot, almost 4 million posts are uploaded to the major social networks every single minute! That's an astounding amount of content and it is crucial for hotels to skillfully use social media in order to effectively compete. From establishing a suitable brand identity and voice to creating content across all the major networks (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, etc.), the goal is to actively engage consumers and to eventually convert them to customers. Some hotels are initiating online contests as a way to attract new customers, while others are rewarding customers with discounts who subscribe to the their email lists or follow their social media pages. Another recent strategy is to employ social media listening tools that track what people are posting online about their businesses. These tools allow hotels to monitor - or listen to - what's being said about a brand across the entire social web, and this can prove to be very valuable, unfiltered information. Social listening permits hotels to be aware of people's opinions about their business, industry or competitors, and some of these tools even listen beyond social media platforms. They also monitor publicly available information on blogs, forums, news outlets and websites. Some listening tools are more focused on gathering and analyzing data, while others offer more engagement-oriented features, which allow hotels to interact with people right from the platform. Often the information that is gleaned from these listening tools ends up being the most authentic, unbiased insights a business can get. The February Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to successfully integrate social media strategies into their operations.