Library Archives

 
David Lund

If your hotel has a reasonable amount of meeting space (+10,000 ft) and your banquet business is a significant contributor in your Food and Beverage Department (+20% of F&B revenue), you are going to want to separate local banquet business from group banquet business on all of your financial statements, forecasts, budgets and daily reporting. At this moment you may be asking, "Why would I want to do that? That sounds like a lot of work." There are some very good reasons to make this practice a standard in your hotel. I see many hotel financial statements and most are missing the boat because they do not separate group and local banquet revenues. Separating this reporting and setting it up properly provides powerful information you can use in your hotel to make better decisions and ultimately be more profitable. Read on...

Brett Ellison

With the annual chaos and excitement of the NCAA Tournament upon us once again, this is a good time to take a closer look at how hotel professionals manage high-volume external events. From concerts to conferences, and festivals to big games, the unique challenges of high-volume special events can put a strain on even the most well run and accommodating hotel property. Read on...

David Ashen

Imagine a hotel meeting space that you'd walk into a decade or two ago. Do you see a 3,000-to-5,000-square-foot ballroom designed to seat hundreds of people, along with a patterned carpet and crystal chandeliers? Partitioned walls that subdivide the room to create secondary meeting spaces for smaller events and meetings? Do you conjure up an image of a boardroom for a dozen or two executives, with the requisite large oval table and leather chairs? A vanilla pre-function room for registration before an event and maybe a cocktail after? Read on...

Deborah Popely

The growth of China's hospitality and tourism industry has been well documented and predictions are that it will soon rival many other popular destinations. Less well-known is the role that the Meetings, Incentives, Conventions and Expositions (MICE) industry is playing in that growth. This article discusses how the MICE industry is fueling hospitality sector growth, especially in China's smaller cities and resort areas, and the factors that will determine whether this growth is sustainable. Read on...

David Muller

Making that road show a permanent fixture within a hotel should be as important as creating the exhibit in the first place because the hotel writ mobile and interactive - with its menagerie of decorative and mechanized birds and giraffes, and the choreographed locomotion of a wintertime scene of holiday revelry centered around a incandescent spruce - is a statement of purpose and a reminder, to visitors and staff alike, that a hotel - your hotel - has a story to tell. Read on...

Stephen J. Renard

When the second World War ended West Berlin was an island surrounded by East Germany. In order to help stabilize and make West Berlin self-sufficient (as they were afraid it would be taken over by the Russians) the Berlin Government supported by West European countries `decided in 1965 to start discussions about an overseas import trade show. The ITB means "International Tourist Exchange". Read on...

Julie Pingston

A recent meeting planner survey conducted by the Event Service Professionals Association (ESPA) reveals that meeting planners view event services managers (ESM) as trusted and valued partners. This sentiment holds true for first-time meetings and events as well as booking repeat business at hotels, convention centers and convention and visitors bureaus. Read on...

Madeline Daryadel

"Been there... done that," seems to be the modem of today. "Same old, same old", but why? It is easy to look outside of the box and be creative. Bring the beach, a concert feel or Latin beat into your dreams of the perfect wedding. Put your nuptials on another level and give your family and friends an event the will be talking about for years to come. Read on...

Madeline Daryadel

Weddings, often considered filler weekend business for hotels can be extremely profitable when the effort is made to turn a wedding reception into a wedding event for local as well as or out-of-town guests. With the upturn in the economy the spend on the Food & Beverage portion has risen by several percentage points which is always good for business. However, catering to the entire occasion by offering welcome baskets, turndown amenities, a flavored coffee with a croissant or bagel as a departing gift and planned recreational activities can mean thousands in additional revenue for a property. Read on...

James Gelfand

The corporate meetings segment has become an increasingly perplexing market that still dictates the success or failure of many new and established hotels. Gone are the conference travel norms of yesteryear; today, this segment is made up of a diverse group of consumers who can no longer be defined as one homogenous population. In addition, the lines between business and leisure are becoming increasingly blurred, due to the current economic climate. Taking all this into consideration, hotels can no longer attract meeting planners with simple cookie-cutter products that are delivered in an uninspired format. Read on...

Eric Rahe

The need for more meeting space seems counterintuitive. The ability to meet and connect outside of a defined venue grew exponentially while the supply of meeting space stagnated over the last three years. And yet, many conference centers, resorts, and hotels are reporting that they do not have the meeting space that event planners and the like need to host their meetings and conferences. Creating non-traditional meeting space and location may be one of the most promising opportunities in developing or renovating meeting and conference space. But first, we must understand how consumers are redefining value in terms of meeting venues. Architect Eric M. Rahe, AIA, LEED AP, explores these issues and offers some best practices for meeting the demand for meeting space. Read on...

Debi Scholar

Organizations develop Service Level Agreements (SLAs) and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that may penalize your Hotel for non-performance of service. An SLA formalizes arrangements between an organization and a supplier to deliver specific services, at specific levels, and at an agreed upon price. If the service is not met according to the agreement, the organization may be entitled to some form of compensation such as a payment or a credit. Learn the five steps that Organizations use to develop these SLAs and KPIs and how the remedy for non-performance may be calculated. Read on...

Debi Scholar

Meetings leaders rely on data intelligence from hoteliers to validate their return on investment and meeting analytics. A chain-wide global sales organization should collect client data across all of its brands and locations whether the property is corporate-owned or franchised while an independent property or local hotelier may only have the micro metrics for its location. Before you present any data, understand the key requirements of your client and the type of environment that they are in now so that you can present your data in the order of their priorities. Don't fall into the analysis abyss and think that all metrics are necessary. Instead, use this data checklist and ask your clients what metrics are important to them. Read on...

Robert Gilbert

As an organization that values the feedback of its members and advisory boards in developing exciting new trade show features, HSMAI is on the forefront of the conference industry in order to fuel sales, inspire marketing and optimize revenue for its partners. HSMAI President and CEO Robert Gilbert provides insights into current trends that are being observed at trade shows, including increased pressure on exhibitors to demonstrate ROI, the challenge of attracting attendees who are time impoverished and securing their attention at expo booths, as well as dealing with the increasing costs of exhibiting and producing a trade show. Read on...

Eric Blanc

With the meetings marketplace now more competitive than ever, sales teams are feeling the pressure to enhance their knowledge base about their respective venues to help bring in new business. To help with this, more and more convention centers, hotels and convention and visitors bureaus (CVBs) are beginning to utilize their convention services managers (CSMs) during the sales process. Read on...

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Coming up in June 2018...

Sales & Marketing: Opinions Matter

Hotel Sales and Marketing Directors manage a complex mix of strategies to attract and convert customers into guests. Part of their expertise includes an awareness of customer behavior during the reservation process, so they can make sure their hotel is favorably positioned. One such trend is the growing popularity of travel review sites. According to one recent survey, 61% of prospective customers consult online reviews in order to validate information about the hotel before making a purchasing decision. Another survey found that the average hotel customer reads between 6-12 reviews across 4-10 properties before making a final decision on where to stay. Similarly, other studies have shown that consumer reviews are a more trusted source of information for prospective customers than other kinds of marketing messaging. In fact, reviews are often considered to be as influential as price regarding whether a customer decides to complete a purchase or not. Plus, travel sites with the most reviews - including recent reviews from satisfied customers and thoughtful responses from staff - were also found to be the most appealing. So having positive reviews on a travel website is essential and can help to increase a hotel's conversion rates dramatically. Of course, there are all kinds of additional marketing strategies for sales and marketing directors to consider - the importance of video and the emergence of live streaming; the implementation of voice search; the proliferation of travel bots; and the development of Instagram as an e-commerce platform. The June Hotel Business Review will report on some of these issues and strategies, and examine how some sales and marketing professionals are integrating them into their operations.