Library Archives

 
Joyce Gioia

Are your younger generation employees driving you crazy? Whether they are Generation Xers or Millennials, these younger employees seem to think and act differently than their older peers. Fear not, help is on the way. We'll not only help you understand their motivations, but we'll also give you proven tactics and strategies that will help you move beyond their get-by attitudes and engage them in ways that will support engagement and retention. Read on...

Erik Van Slyke

Most hotel executives understand the strong connection between employee retention and solid financial performance. At the same time in an industry where annual turnover rates average 27-37%, improved retention rates can seem more like a distant objective than something truly achievable. This is especially true if your hotel is not listed in Fortune Magazine's 100 Best Places to Work. The drivers of employee retention are about much more than an admired brand, strong financial performance and best practice HR programs. The best results are achieved when managers at all levels embrace four important principles. Read on...

Joyce Gioia

As a successful hotel executive, you keep your finger on the pulse of every aspect of your property. If you are like most hoteliers, one of your greatest challenges is engaging and retaining frontline staff --- housekeepers/room attendants, bell staff, kitchen help, and often the high-stress switchboard. Are you ready for some leading edge solutions? Then you will certainly want to read this article. Combining knowledge of our industry with effective non-hospitality employer practices, it provides eight great low- and no-cost ideas that you can implement tomorrow, without breaking the bank. Read on...

Jason Ferrara

The hospitality industry was not immune to the challenges that many organizations faced in the past year. Benefit cuts, layoffs and restructuring are just a few of the hurdles that were encountered in 2009. As hospitality employers look ahead to the coming months, they will remain cautious with their hiring plans, but they do plan to add more headcount than they did last year. According to CareerBuilder's hospitality hiring forecast, 12 percent of hospitality companies plan to add full-time employees this year; compared to only 5 percent who said the same in 2009. Temporary hiring - often a positive indicator of future full-time recruitment - is also forecasted to increase with 22 percent of companies saying they will bring on part-time help. Read on...

Jonathan Gilbert

Since 1986, employers have been required to verify the employment eligibility of all employees in accordance with the federal Employment Eligibility Verification program. Employers must document their determinations that acceptable identity and employment authorization documents presented by employees reasonably appear to be genuine, relate to the employee and establish employment eligibility. On-going comprehensive immigration reform debate and the current economic downturn have put the magnet for illegal immigration, unlawful employment, in the enforcement spotlight. This article discusses aspects of the government's current worksite enforcement strategy and the consequential need for employers to implement an effective compliance program. Read on...

Robert O'Halloran

Managers and employees need to be better prepared to work in the fast paced hospitality industry. The rigors of the economy, community interaction, public policy and keen competition need to be handled by well prepared managers and employees. Education, training and professional development has become increasingly important and in the current climate education appears more important than ever. The issue for many employees and or their employer is when is there time to get the needed education and or training? This article provides a guide to those thinking about and or seeking additional education in general and more specifically a distance education (DE) option. There are many choices but the issues of fit and program quality are key for student success. Read on...

Jason Ferrara

While some signs of economic stabilization have started to emerge, many hotel workers are still handling heavier workloads due to downsized staff levels - a stressful situation that can result in worker burnout. As a hotel leader, it's essential to closely monitor your staff and make an effort to reduce burnout and promote healthy work/life balance. This article offers five solutions to help your hotel workers manage these challenging times, so that they can keep stress levels low and productivity high. Read on...

Jane Renton

"Never relinquish clothing to a hotel valet without first specifically telling him that you want it back." Wits and wags throughout the ages have made much fun at the expense of hotels, usually for their failings. Oscar Wilde, while lying in a Parisian hotel, famously said, "Either that wallpaper goes, or I do." He died before the d'ecor was changed, or so the story goes. But, it is rare to find a joke about the failure of training. In suggesting that a hotel valet might need reminding to bring her clothes back, the American writer Fran Lebowitz may have made the only one about a subject that can be, after all, dreadfully dry. Or is it? Beyond someone simply looking for a bed for the night, the number one desire of most hotel guests, I believe, is to feel good. That may mean different things for different people but, overwhelmingly, it means, first and foremost, to be treated well, not by things but by people. Read on...

Paul Feeney

Top executives agree that the "good old days" of rewarding employees for 35 years of loyal service are a thing of the past. Years ago, individuals who had experience at several companies were considered "job-hoppers". Potential employers wondered what was wrong with them and why they couldn't hold a job. Today, changing jobs has become a necessity if individuals expect to advance their careers. The very traits that made them unstable are now hallmarks of a well-rounded, ambitious and assertive professional. Change and its associated risks are never easy. To quit or not to quit is often a gut-wrenching decision - requiring careful consideration and soul-searching. Read on...

Paul Feeney

It seems to be an employer's dream come true: tens of thousands of resumes out there in cyberspace, waiting to be plucked. Need more? Then list your position on the Internet and They Will Come. Alas, while companies across the country have experimented and implemented electronic recruiting as a very beneficial and cost effective tool, results can be decidedly mixed for recruiting for all positions. In order to understand the potential and the pitfalls of on-line searches, those who are considering a cruise on the Internet may appreciate a few words of explanation first. Much of this business presence is found on the Internet, the "Yellow Pages" of cyberspace. All sorts of for-profit and nonprofit organizations have established Home Pages on the Web to promote their products and services (and, in some cases, to advertise for job applicants). Read on...

Paul Feeney

Certainly, anyone who works in today's corporations knows that far too few employees are trying to do far too much work with far too limited resources. At some point in the last century, people were those companies' most important resource - but that was then and this is now, dude. If not ignored or placed on hold by corporate edict, hiring has become a necessary evil as opposed to a golden opportunity. And with every possible ounce of cost being wrung from corporate budgets, it seems to make sense to hire on the cheap: waste-not, want-not. This has led to the creation of computerized "vendor management systems" for personnel procurement; applicant-tracking software that classifies, files and retrieves r'esum'es electronically; "preferred recruiter" lists based largely on search firms' willingness to discount their services; increased reliance on online job boards, and so on. Read on...

Paul Feeney

It's the 'Main Event' - the face-to-face interview - at which new careers will be launched or left at the dock. The employer is deciding whether to extend a job offer, while the candidate is deciding whether to accept one if offered. This is clearly an interview that's going nowhere. Totally monotonous and stuck in an endless loop of resume verification and leading questions. Indeed, no effort is required to conduct it. By contrast, great interviews require a clear understanding of what information the interviewer hopes to obtain - and what kinds of questions will produce the intended results? Here are ten questions that do an especially good job of revealing what makes a candidate tick... Read on...

Paul Feeney

Chances are you've built or inherited a team that most days seem to work pretty well. Perhaps you yourself are a part of a higher team. Perhaps your team members have their own teams in place. Looked at from this perspective, the entire organization is a collection of overlapping teams - from the board of directors to the smallest sales office and production unit. The organization thus functions like a complex molecule, with the various teams as its atoms and each leader as a nucleus. And as long as any given team does not show obvious signs of radioactive decay, the comfortable assumption is that it's stable and performing as intended. Naturally, team members have their foibles. Tom, for example, tends to become passive-aggressive when assigned tasks he doesn't enjoy. Amanda is too inclined to criticize other members of the team. And Ed shoots first, asking questions later. How many - if any - of such foibles should be accepted as normal human behavior? And how are they affecting overall team performance? Could the team be doing better than it does? Read on...

Paul Feeney

There is no end to surveys proving that people change jobs for a variety of subjective and objective reasons, most of which have nothing to do with pay. All that having been said, executive recruiters know one great truth: While candidates have been known to decline high-paying jobs, few will accept low-paying ones. Many employers, nonetheless, find it increasingly difficult to offer superior candidates superior salaries. That's because salary ranges have fallen victim to disappearing merit budgets, the flattening of corporate organization charts and the growing emphasis on pay-for-performance incentives in place of high base pay. Hiring managers and HR professionals can address this challenge by keeping three compensation principles in mind: (1) there is more to compensation than salary; (2) not all components of compensation serve the same purpose; and (3) different kinds of organizations need different kinds of compensation plans. Read on...

Paul Feeney

Professional baseball teams have developed a lucrative sideline letting middle-aged males sweat it out for a week at a real-life training camp. It's the dream of a lifetime for avid fans, and their mates pay dearly to send them, usually in honor of an otherwise depressing birthday. Travel with us instead to Fantasy Interviewing Camp, where Major League players make the hard-to-master process of candidate attraction and selection look easy. Note that we said "attraction" as well as "selection," because interviewing is a two-way street. It's great that you have chosen Mary as better qualified than Joe, but what if she has not chosen you? Oh, yes: And leave your baggage behind. If your organization is like most others around the world, interviewing is a hit-or-miss process, with more misses than hits. Let's take a fresh look. Read on...

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Coming up in May 2019...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Corporate Social Responsibility

The hotel industry has undertaken a long-term effort to build more responsible and socially conscious businesses. What began with small efforts to reduce waste - such as paperless checkouts and refillable soap dispensers - has evolved into an international movement toward implementing sustainable development practices. In addition to establishing themselves as good corporate citizens, adopting eco-friendly practices is sound business for hotels. According to a recent report from Deloitte, 95% of business travelers believe the hotel industry should be undertaking “green” initiatives, and Millennials are twice as likely to support brands with strong management of environmental and social issues. Given these conclusions, hotels are continuing to innovate in the areas of environmental sustainability. For example, one leading hotel chain has designed special elevators that collect kinetic energy from the moving lift and in the process, they have reduced their energy consumption by 50%  over conventional elevators. Also, they installed an advanced air conditioning system which employs a magnetic mechanical system that makes them more energy efficient. Other hotels are installing Intelligent Building Systems which monitor and control temperatures in rooms, common areas and swimming pools, as well as ventilation and cold water systems. Some hotels are installing Electric Vehicle charging stations, planting rooftop gardens, implementing stringent recycling programs, and insisting on the use of biodegradable materials. Another trend is the creation of Green Teams within a hotel's operation that are tasked to implement earth-friendly practices and manage budgets for green projects. Some hotels have even gone so far as to curtail or eliminate room service, believing that keeping the kitchen open 24/7 isn't terribly sustainable. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.