Library Archives

 
Bonnie Knutson

We are Sasha Cohen, Reggie Bush, the Olsen twins, and the McCaughey septuplets. Born after 1985, we already number 75+ million, and are growing. By 2010, we will be 100+ million strong. And with our numbers, we will become a very powerful economic force as we travel, stay in your hotel, and become members of your loyalty program. Because we were the first generation to grow up immersed in a digital-driven world, we are often called Generation Y (Gen Y), the Net Generation or iGen. But we are also known as Echo Boomers, because we are primarily children of the Baby Boomers. We have even been labeled the Einstein Generation because we are adept at multi-tasking. Read on...

Jed Heller

A well conceived and executed marketing strategy can be the key success factor for small hotel owners, whether the property is privately owned or a small franchise within a large chain. In today's uncertain economy, many hotel owners are rethinking their marketing strategy and re-evaluating the magnitude of their financial investment as they can't afford to waste their limited funds allocated to marketing. But, they can't survive without a marketing investment either. Logic dictates that owners must get the biggest bang for their buck with their marketing spending. Read on...

Naseem Javed

There are three types of business names, Healthy, Injured or on Life-Support. Corporations must know the hidden the powers of their names. Each business name has several components often invisible to marketing executives and these characteristics and split personalities determine the success or failure of a name. To measure the effectiveness of a name or to see how much extra luggage a name is burdened with, following are the guidelines for a general check up. Read on...

Edward Donaldson

In the world of hotel consortiums, a brand is only as good, or in the case of Small Luxury Hotels of the World, as great, as its member hotels. In order to maintain the supreme quality and service that makes a "Small Luxury Hotel stay" an unmatched travel experience, SLH employs stringent processes for evaluating both prospective hotels and existing member hotels. When guests look through the beautiful color directory of our hotels, they expect and deserve a guarantee that all 300 plus properties across the globe will deliver the same high level of service and quality. To that end, the evaluation process for admitting new members involves a deep consideration of how the prospective hotel fits with and enhances the SLH brand. I will take you through the process of becoming a member of one of the elite hotel memberships in the world and provide you with an insight into how we choose our new hotels, as well as ensure that our existing members continue to meet the lofty SLH standards. Read on...

Naseem Javed

Most corporations, when giving birth to a new product, behave just like parents jumping in frenzy in a maternity ward. This typical hysterical hoopla of the incubation wing is often replaced by a subtler, cubicle behavior and at times becomes a subdued Dilbertish style revolution. Objects do fly, even though they are memos or sometimes, sharp yet harmless, foamy projectiles. Everyone shares the excitement and all fights are well intentioned. Everyone wants a successful launch. There is always a good feeling and everyone is happy. Read on...

Johnna Freud

Have you ever asked yourself, "how do travelers decide where to stay?" Did you ever question how travelers view your hotel, resort, bed & breakfast or inn compared to your competition? If these questions sound familiar, then qualitative marketing research may provide some of the answers you seek. This article is the first in a series about qualitative marketing research. It provides a basic overview about this methodology, especially for those in the hospitality industry who are not fully acquainted with it. Read on...

Brenda Fields

The advancement of technology has made the world a smaller place. Movies, television, and now the Internet have created a world which has fostered a better understanding of and access to different cultures. But, does this familiarity and exposure lessen cultural characteristics or nuances? Is it correct to assume that this familiarity creates instant purchases of your product? And does this also ensure that your product will be selected over your competition in these markets? This article will address key components to consider when planning and implementing global marketing campaigns or initiatives or in just reaching specific international markets. Read on...

Johnna Freud

Qualitative marketing research can be a valuable tool for gaining an in-depth understanding of business travelers' behaviors and attitudes toward hotels. It is a means for investigating what influences business travelers' purchase decisions and why. Obviously, business travelers today have many hotel choices. In fact, in many instances, these choices are within walking distance of one another. So, why do some business travelers choose to stay at your hotel while others stay at the one across the street? How can you drive more traffic to your property? Understanding what motivates them can greatly influence your bottom line. Read on...

Stacy Shaw

If you think your marketing efforts are finished when your guests walk through the front door, then you are leaving money on the table. Marketing initiatives that generated the guest booking are just the first part of the battle. Getting guests to spend money in your hotel throughout their stay is what drives incremental revenue and makes your marketing efforts a complete success. So how do you maximizing guests' expenditures? By using a touch-point marketing strategy. Touch points are opportunities for generating incremental revenue from hotel guests throughout their stay from the moment of arrival to departure. Touch-point marketing involves determining the message, identifying the areas of opportunity, developing a method of delivery and tracking the conversion rate. In a nutshell, you have to tell the guest what you want them to do, how you want them to do it, affirm that they have made the right decision and tell them thank you for their spending. In addition to driving incremental revenue, touch-point marketing is critical to building brand loyalty. Read on...

Stacy Shaw

Marketing partnerships can provide multiple benefits. They can help stretch your marketing budget, expand your brand visibility, provide a low-risk test marketing opportunity, generate incremental dollars and create community goodwill, just to name a few. However these same marketing partnerships can explode and cost you unexpected time, money and brand credibility if they are not developed in a strategic manner. At m-k-t-g, we employ an eight-step approach to the development of strategic partnerships and marketing alliances to ensure that all parties involved receive a ROI that is favorable to both their brand image and bottom line. Read on...

Cheryle Pingel

This year, experts predict that business travel will rebound to pre-9/11 levels for the first time. The National Business Travelers Association says there will be 219 million domestic business trips in 2005, up from 210.5 million in 2003 and awfully close to the 220 million made in 2000. This is good news for travel aggregators and suppliers alike - great news, really. But how do travel marketing executives leverage this upswing in terms of online marketing? Well, luckily there is even more good news: There are still plenty of stones left unturned in the online marketing arena, especially in the search engine marketing space (which I must say is the darling of the online marketing world). Read on...

Edward Donaldson

The outlook for the coming years show countries such as India, Brazil, China & Russia having the largest impact on the consumer market. China is the largest population in the world and recent statistics indicate that 1 out of every 6 people on earth are living in China. This will have a drastic effect on the travel industry and the luxury market. Analysts also forecast that China will be the world's most important luxury market by 2011. As more products become available to more people, the pressure increases to offer something truly special. Read on...

Debbie Bermont

There is a common misconception in the marketplace of exactly how you define a target market. At the very least companies define their target market using specific demographic criteria such as age, income, location and professional title. Then, there are companies who add in some psychographic information such as hobbies, interests, travel habits and buying behavior. This information is all important...but it is only 25% of the definition of who is the ideal fit for your property. If you were to throw a dart at a dartboard, the demographic and psychographics of your target market would represent the outermost ring of the board. This means that if you are targeting all of your marketing and sales efforts using only demographic and psychographic information as your ideal market criteria, you will have a tough time hitting a bulls eye with any consistency. This translates into wasted time, money and resources marketing to the wrong people - a sure sign your property is out of alignment and you haven't correctly profiled your ideal customer. Here are telltale signs that your property is out of alignment: Read on...

Naseem Javed

No matter how and where you travel, with or without your products or your corporate image, the chances are that a lot of your marketing messages are getting lost in translation as they make their way around the globe. Business names are being hit the hardest as the world becomes smaller and companies go global. Each one of us is now spinning in a mix of international alphabet soup of strange names and terminologies. You invent something new, send out a release, the media talks about it and, within seconds, it becomes an international item.Your business name image might end up as a great universal message or emulate some strange and confusing messages with insults or profanity. But why? Read on...

Naseem Javed

Is this the dawning of the age of branding or just another black hole? Learn and teach new standards, lead and spread the new knowledge in your organization, break the old methods. The sooner you come out of the bondage of the old fashioned marketing and branding campaigns, the sooner you will see a new dawn. There is certainly light on the other side of this black hole. There are brand new rules of global marketing. A proper discovery process on how to approach visibility while building clean international name identities for this global name-economy is a must. Globalization will make the localization process manageable. Look out for feelings of certain numbness while sitting in a quiet time zone in a corporation. Read on...

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Coming up in August 2019...

Food & Beverage: Millennial Chefs Lead the Way

Led by Millennial chefs, hotels continue to foster sustainability, sourcing and wellness within their dining rooms and banquet spaces, and by all measures, this is responsible for an increase in their revenues. In many hotels, the food & beverage division contributes 50 per cent or more to hotel sales and they are currently experiencing double-digit growth. As a result, hotel owners are allocating an increasing amount of square footage for F&B operations. The biggest area of investment is in catering, which is thriving due to weddings, social events and business conferences. Hotels are also investing in on-site market or convenience stores that offer fresh/refrigerated foods, and buffet concepts also continue to expand. Other popular food trends include a rise of fermented offerings such as kombucha, kimchi, sauerkraut, tempeh, kefir and pickles - all to produce the least processed food possible, and to boost probiotics to improve the immune system. Tea is also enjoying something of a renaissance. More people are thinking of tea with the same reverence as coffee due to its many varieties, applications and benefits. Craft tea blending, nitro tea on tap and even tea cocktails are beginning to appear on some hotel menus. Another trend concerns creating a unique, individualized and memorable experience for guests. This could be a small consumable item that is specific to a property or event, such as house-made snack mixes, gourmet popcorn, macaroons, or jars of house-made jams, chutneys, and mustards -all produced and customized in house. One staple that is in decline is the in-room minibar which seems to have fallen out of favor. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document the trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.