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Gayle Bulls Dixon

The spa is often a leading driver for many guests as they make hotel/resort selections. In fact, consumers seek out a spa experience they feel they can trust for high quality and value. Hotels/resorts can expect an increase in average daily rate (ADR), average length of stay, food & beverage revenues, as well as in the sale of other amenities offered by the property, if the leadership and staff understand how to utilize the draw of the spa to its consumers. Here are some simple guidelines to help you start and stay on the right track of spa profitability... Read on...

Peggy Borgman

Measuring employee productivity in the "stay" spa differs significantly from doing the same in the day spa environment. Day spas look hard at statistics such as client retention and retail ratios. Hotel spa employees work with a transient guest, who is, according to popular wisdom, less likely to return and less likely to buy. Or are they? Not all "stay" spas are the same. Understanding typical guest behavior can enable you to create realistic measurements of guest retention by spa employees. Read on...

Casey Olsen

Resort and Spa, Resort and Spa, a fitting end to a resorts name, however, what the American spa has morphed into may have now departed from what was the luxury spa experience. As with any functional item, when a boom occurs often the classical original gets diluted in the process. This article will travel back in time when the American spa was first conceived to what we now know as a resort or luxury spa facility and endeavor. Read on...

Peter Anderson

Today in most resorts the inclusion of a spa is no longer a luxury, but rather a standard amenity, expected and ubiquitous. Significant cross pollinating among the day, medical, amenity, and destination spas has created a competitive and comprehensive spa environment that here-to-fore that has never been experienced. This dynamic has created the phenomenon of Spa Wars, where product differentiation is subtle and the competitive edge can be paper thin. It is ironic that as the spa industry matures, distinctions between spa types are becoming blurred, resulting in subtle levels of segmentation and product differentiation that provide "options" to the savvy spa goer and "confusion" to the rest of us. Historically, hotel and resort spas have been classified as either "destination" or "amenity", meaning they were either the specific reason to travel to a remote location or they were and an added amenity (sometimes created as an after thought) for the an indulgent resort clientele. Read on...

Gayle Bulls Dixon

What awaits the ever-more-savvy spa connoisseur in 2006 and beyond? The number of spas in the U.S. has topped 12,000, with spas offering a dizzying variety of services that address everything from weight loss to stress relief to skin revitalization and more. Looking ahead, we believe that spas will become more focused - rather than offering a little bit of everything, spa operators are going to specialize and become expert at the services they offer, whether it's Ayurveda or male specific treatments or whatever. With the number of spas only continuing to grow, spas are going to specialize and consolidate in order to survive. And diversify they will! Medical Spas, Retirement Spas, Man Spas - Oy Vey! Watch for these very interesting developments in the year(s) ahead. Read on...

Peggy Borgman

Do you consider your most popular services your most "profitable"? Just because you sell a lot of something doesn't make it profitable. Service profit is produced by careful control of your direct costs to produce that service. Profit is never just a happy accident in a spa business. Despite the seemingly lavish price tags for services in resort and hotel spas, our expenses and overhead are equally lavish. Spa directors must be constantly monitoring the actual expenses of producing their services, as well as looking for opportunities to simplify their menu and their operation, while adding value. Read on...

Jane Segerberg

Spas in resort and hotel properties are no longer an amenity that sets the property apart from its competitors - - spas are now a necessity and as a necessity, require more than build-it-and-they-will-will come planning. For the hotelier who is exploring the advantages of hiring a consultant or is already convinced that a spa consultant is a necessity for the project and wants to make a good choice, this article is intended to be helpful in understanding the role of the full service spa consultant and how to sort through the maize to find the right consulting firm for your property. Read on...

Jane Segerberg

Spas are a necessity for resorts and hotels. The Spa Business is experiencing an exponential growth rate. The number of Spa Goers is growing. Spas are hotel profit centers. Great statements! Great trends! What are the realities that these trends bring? The supply of spas has grown to the point that competition and consumer knowledge has changed the face of the industry. Now it is not just "a spa" that is necessary for a resort or hotel, it is a spa with an experience that is special for each guest along with service that is so seamless that the guest is not aware of it. No matter how spectacular the architectural features, or chic the interior design, or how creative the spa menu; if the experience and service delivery falls short, then guests do not recommend or return to the spa. Read on...

Jane Segerberg

Thirteen years ago, when I entered the Spa Industry as the manager of a new Resort Spa, the number of spas and spa-goers were few and having a spa at a hotel or resort was a novel amenity that was not expected to be profitable. Soon it was realized that there was a demand for the spa experience along with greater expectations. Hotels and resorts then began to take the bull by the horns and realize that not unlike their other retail outlets; good concept planning, management and marketing were important to the spa's success. With the change in the spa's financial expectations came spas that were managed and marketed with increasing know-how. Read on...

Jane Segerberg

As everyone in the Hospitality Industry knows, our guests arrive with more than their luggage - - they also have their own personal baggage, which in turn interferes with their immediate enjoyment of their hotel-resort experience. Your hotel-resort spa is one of the quickest ways to help guests shed themselves of their stresses and begin to relax and appreciate the hotel-resort and its amenities. Spas are no longer a frivolous amenity to a hotel-resort. According to the International Spa Association's Spa Industry Survey conducted by Pricewaterhouse Coopers, spas are a booming industry that will continue to grow. Read on...

Jane Segerberg

You are probably reading this because you are anticipating building a spa within your hotel/resort property or you currently have a spa that could improve its performance. In the short history of spas in hotels and resorts, the definition of success has changed dramatically from a hotel amenity that should break even to an amenity that adds to the resort/hotel's market appeal, guest satisfaction and profit. Spas remain a very small portion of the overall hotel/resort gross sales, however, spa sales have risen and overall resort/hotel spa profits have risen dramatically. Read on...

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Coming up in August 2019...

Food & Beverage: Millennial Chefs Lead the Way

Led by Millennial chefs, hotels continue to foster sustainability, sourcing and wellness within their dining rooms and banquet spaces, and by all measures, this is responsible for an increase in their revenues. In many hotels, the food & beverage division contributes 50 per cent or more to hotel sales and they are currently experiencing double-digit growth. As a result, hotel owners are allocating an increasing amount of square footage for F&B operations. The biggest area of investment is in catering, which is thriving due to weddings, social events and business conferences. Hotels are also investing in on-site market or convenience stores that offer fresh/refrigerated foods, and buffet concepts also continue to expand. Other popular food trends include a rise of fermented offerings such as kombucha, kimchi, sauerkraut, tempeh, kefir and pickles - all to produce the least processed food possible, and to boost probiotics to improve the immune system. Tea is also enjoying something of a renaissance. More people are thinking of tea with the same reverence as coffee due to its many varieties, applications and benefits. Craft tea blending, nitro tea on tap and even tea cocktails are beginning to appear on some hotel menus. Another trend concerns creating a unique, individualized and memorable experience for guests. This could be a small consumable item that is specific to a property or event, such as house-made snack mixes, gourmet popcorn, macaroons, or jars of house-made jams, chutneys, and mustards -all produced and customized in house. One staple that is in decline is the in-room minibar which seems to have fallen out of favor. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document the trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.