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Diego Lowenstein

When done right, hotel owners can use a spa to tap into a valuable market and enhance the hospitality experience by restoring mindfulness and overall well-being for patrons. This, in turn, can earn repeat guests and positively impact the property's bottom line. That's why it's so important for hotel owners to stay ahead of evolving industry trends and guest expectations, and avoid common pitfalls when developing or renovating an on-site spa. Owners who successfully differentiate their hotels typically have a strategic advantage, and spa treatments remain a terrific way to stand out from the competition. Read on...

Lorraine Abelow

Marketing your spa the right way is vital to attracting more guests. For the most desirable results, find a public relations agency with years of spa PR experience. The best match will generate the most effective strategies for your hotel spa and execute them properly so you receive maximum exposure.One of the best outcomes is getting featured in A-list publications like The New York Times or the Huffington Post. They are invaluable when it comes to online ranking because Google and other search engines pay more attention to top-tier outlets by rewarding these stories with a higher SEO ranking. Read on...

Judith Jackson

To Spa or not to Spa? If that is your question for your hotel or resort, you are reading the right article. Luckily, there are more good answers from experts in the hospitality and spa fields than Hamlet ever imagined. If your property has the space and financing to install a spa, this is certainly a time to do it. Your guests are now conditioned to expect not only a fitness facility, but stress reduction massages and rejuvenating facials -- as well as the nurturing escape of a well-planned and run spa. Read on...

Mary Gendron

Two decades ago, the trend toward fitness centers in hotels went from nice-to-have to must-have. Today, that trend is spa. What is fortunate for owners and operators who are currently sans spa, is to realize that the definition of spa is flexible with broad parameters, transcending the confines of bricks and mortar. This article delves into the trend and reasons behind the demand and the timing for it. It also addresses the philosophy of spa, and provides a selection of options for consideration in retrofitting a spa into an existing operation. If you've been immersed in the hospitality industry for some time, you will recognize the push-pull dynamic that propels the industry forward. Read on...

Judith Jackson

How would you like your guests to be positively addicted to staying at your hotel? That's what can happen if you surround them with the fragrance of pure, natural essential oils which affect the fastest, most direct sense into the brain - the sense of smell. Up-market retailers have known this forever. When I was publicity and feature events director of Bloomingdales, I always knew what they were promoting by the fragrance that permeated the main floor all the way down to the subway entrance. Sandalwood would be the Indian promotion, Chanel perfumes, unmistakably Paris. Aromatherapy was, and I guess still is, Bloomie's secret weapon. It can easily be yours. Read on...

Camille Hoheb

Global Wellness Day (GWD) is an international, noncommercial initiative aimed at improving well-being across the world. Today, there are 3,000 locations in 100 countries organizing GWD celebrations worldwide. This article is part 2 of a 2-part series. Part-1 featured Belgin Aksoy, Founder of GWD. As a new Ambassador to Global Wellness Day, I was motivated to write a series about GWD for several reasons. 1) To create awareness and excitement about wellness as a lifestyle and as a business strategy 2) To promote wellness to the hotel industry 3) To share insights from hospitality professionals that have direct involvement with Global Wellness Day in order to encourage greater participation 4) To provide several first-hand accounts about GWD that could be helpful in spurring support from other sectors. Read on...

Judy Singer

In 1983, HFD became the first full-service spa consulting company in the US. Our mission was to develop, plan, market and manage spas primarily for up-scale hotels, resorts and mixed-use developments. Our focus was to create spas that appealed to guests, staff, lodging operators, developers and investors. We created the blueprint for what we called the "business of spas." We wanted all our clients to have spas that would be profit centers in and of themselves as well as tangible assets to the company's "core" business of selling hotel rooms and real estate. Read on...

Paula J. Azevedo

In an era of where the words personal, experiential, adventure, extreme and destination are often heard - at least among those of us in the business of hotels - it is clear consumers are seeking uniqueness in their travels, whether they are for business or pleasure. Hoteliers are wisely taking this to heart and responding to these demands. One way owners and operators are strategically meeting guests' needs is by tapping into and elevating the experience of a once luxury-only amenity: the spa. The focus makes logical sense. Read on...

Michael Koethner

A collection of data, but not in the old-fashioned, very outdated and very boring numbers approach; rather with a compassionate view on how the industry will evolve, beyond the veil, in the very near future. Let's have a look at how to create a visionary, functional and operational double treatment room that is designed, professionally organized and set-up in such a manner as to fulfill the therapist's performance requirements and to accompany the demands of the new market, as well as the future guests' expectations. It will be crucial to include all aspects from the inside out. Read on...

Judith Jackson

Hotel amenities as a guest offering have become a vital source of attracting business and building a hotel brand. This is a relatively recent phenomenon that has grown in importance as guest's demand for good quality amenities has become universal. As I thought about writing this article I realized I should go to leaders in the hospitality field as well as draw upon my 15-year experience as the creator of a branded amenity line. Hunter Amenities of Canada and Susan Ricci, innovative former hotel managing director and current hotel and club consultant, became invaluable sources of information and comment from different points of view - which I think you will find as stimulating and helpful as I do. Read on...

Camille Hoheb

A hotel's vitality hinges on the guest experience. Out of all the business trends, none is more powerful than the growing wellness movement. Wellness is everywhere. This is especially true in tourism, with healthy amenities at airports, airlines and lodging. Healthy hotel brands are leading the way and other properties are following suite. Hotels deliver healthy options related to physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, environmental and social wellbeing. Read on...

Judith Jackson

Who is the first person your guest has a conversation with as they arrive and enter? Is it the doorman, parking valet, front desk associate, or bell person? By the time your guest enters the hotel, one or more members of your staff have already effectively communicated your property's number of stars -- official or not. This messaging is telegraphed through the owner or operator's philosophy of management and training, and it goes well beyond any off-the-shelf or even custom training program or protocol. It requires a good dose of soul. Read on...

Michael Koethner

Ideally, humanity, or at least the one's involved in the health and wellness industry, should by now be aware of the fact that there is much more to the every day grinding than just the mundane existence. The one's who are honestly and genuinely tuned into the yet invisible spheres, plugged in - so to speak, and living deep down in the well of the energy whirl, are very well aware of the huge opportunities that are yet to come, in regard to health, healing, wellness, prosperity and pure bliss. However, it is still a challenge not be distracted by all the useless, artificial distortions, self-centeredness, and chit-chat that drives humanity apart. Read on...

Michael Koethner

The hospitality and wellness industry has reached a point where it has no other choice than to start applying an integration process with a focus on how to encourage and apply a development of the individual human potential that matches the new economy. There is a business environment in the making where companies and corporations are going to be seen and operated as living organisms, occupied by human beings who thoughtfully and organically communicate and interact from the heart energy, at all times Read on...

Michael Koethner

The next few years, and the distant future, will see the profession of alternative therapy (i.e. naturopathy, homeopathy, physiotherapy, psychotherapy, energy alignment, soul healing, fitness, exercise and the likes) in much higher demand than at any rate and time before. The increasing demand for complementary therapies will unfold itself through the yet unseen energetic forces of the soul and spirit. These two entities will ignite a fire with the human body volcano to release deeply repressed and unresolved issues; regardless of the mental, spiritual and/or physical condition of the individual. It is going to happen across the globe, stretching into every tiny corner of society; the business environment must be ready to accommodate its demand and be open to new opportunities, not the other way around. Read on...

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Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.