Library Archives

 
Mia A. Mackman

Growth in travel and tourism continues to rise in conjunction with intergenerational lifestyles, shifting values and increasing wellness keynotes. Every generation has unique preferences and imperatives that set them apart and stick. Accounting for nearly half of the population, Millennials and Generation Z have considerable weight in the market share. This article examines perceived values vs. core values and the benefits of incorporating a multi-generational, multi-faceted approach to spa and wellness programming to enhance customer spend and loyalty. Read on...

Bob Caputo

I have three words for hotel executives, which may as well be the title of their collective mission: Health and Wellness. Which is to say, the new approach to hospitality - the experience every vacationer deserves to enjoy, and every business traveler has a right to receive - is a healthy atmosphere, a place that exudes the virtues of fitness and nutrition; be it an urban property or a resort location, a boutique destination or a five-star hacienda amidst lush acreage and the soft winds of a turquoise sea; be it a high-end spot or a workaday building, suitable for conferences or company meetings, where a health and wellness expert can consult with a hotel executive - or speak directly to guests - about how to achieve these goals. Read on...

Mia A. Mackman

The global spa movement, which includes wellness tourism, amounts to upwards of $3 trillion dollars per year. What physical and strategic elements are key to driving bottom-line performance at traditional and wellness-focused spas? Relaxation and a sense of wellbeing are at the heart of the spa and wellness market. Hence, it's no wonder that hotels, resorts, and spas have begun to reorganize their operations around wellness. The benefits, in the form of a stronger bottom line and appeal to demand segments, extend not only to guests but to hoteliers and hospitality companies, as well. Read on...

Oliver Ryan

Managers at Hyatt Regency San Francisco had a battle on their hands — in the best possible way. Determined to do something fun and healthy for their 400 person staff, they launched a challenge on a digital platform that powers fitness tracker-driven wellness programs. The first challenge was so successful, two other Bay Area Hyatts wanted in, and the Battle of the Bay was on. Read on...

Melinda Minton

The spa arena has changed dramatically in the last year. Many of the changes should have been in place long ago, but the consumer wasn't noisy enough in their demands for change. Technology, eco-graphics and demographics have forced the spa director to give more attention to the spa guest, use technology where spa therapies may be enhanced and select product lines that are effective but also packaged responsibly and derived from renewable resources. Spa travel is growing more than ever anticipated and the traveling spa guest has very specific requests, such as learning. Finally, millennials are dictating much of the change. They are educated, affluent and accustomed to "on demand" everything. They want the best and they want it now. Read on...

Mary Gendron

The evolution of spa from pampering palace to well of wellbeing mirrors what road warriors seek. Daily external forces centered in technology and speed can pull a person off center. Reconnecting with oneself calls for calm and quietude, an intentional break from outside influences. A spa, by nature, provides the perfect environment, with spa professionals assisting guests in identifying that internal "sense of spa" - a peaceful place to go to anytime. Culling trends from respected industry sources, this article explores five ways in which spas are supporting guests' healthy lifestyles with evidence-based offerings and practices that will travel with them wherever they go. Read on...

Diego Lowenstein

When done right, hotel owners can use a spa to tap into a valuable market and enhance the hospitality experience by restoring mindfulness and overall well-being for patrons. This, in turn, can earn repeat guests and positively impact the property's bottom line. That's why it's so important for hotel owners to stay ahead of evolving industry trends and guest expectations, and avoid common pitfalls when developing or renovating an on-site spa. Owners who successfully differentiate their hotels typically have a strategic advantage, and spa treatments remain a terrific way to stand out from the competition. Read on...

Lorraine Abelow

Marketing your spa the right way is vital to attracting more guests. For the most desirable results, find a public relations agency with years of spa PR experience. The best match will generate the most effective strategies for your hotel spa and execute them properly so you receive maximum exposure.One of the best outcomes is getting featured in A-list publications like The New York Times or the Huffington Post. They are invaluable when it comes to online ranking because Google and other search engines pay more attention to top-tier outlets by rewarding these stories with a higher SEO ranking. Read on...

Judith Jackson

To Spa or not to Spa? If that is your question for your hotel or resort, you are reading the right article. Luckily, there are more good answers from experts in the hospitality and spa fields than Hamlet ever imagined. If your property has the space and financing to install a spa, this is certainly a time to do it. Your guests are now conditioned to expect not only a fitness facility, but stress reduction massages and rejuvenating facials -- as well as the nurturing escape of a well-planned and run spa. Read on...

Mary Gendron

Two decades ago, the trend toward fitness centers in hotels went from nice-to-have to must-have. Today, that trend is spa. What is fortunate for owners and operators who are currently sans spa, is to realize that the definition of spa is flexible with broad parameters, transcending the confines of bricks and mortar. This article delves into the trend and reasons behind the demand and the timing for it. It also addresses the philosophy of spa, and provides a selection of options for consideration in retrofitting a spa into an existing operation. If you've been immersed in the hospitality industry for some time, you will recognize the push-pull dynamic that propels the industry forward. Read on...

Judith Jackson

How would you like your guests to be positively addicted to staying at your hotel? That's what can happen if you surround them with the fragrance of pure, natural essential oils which affect the fastest, most direct sense into the brain - the sense of smell. Up-market retailers have known this forever. When I was publicity and feature events director of Bloomingdales, I always knew what they were promoting by the fragrance that permeated the main floor all the way down to the subway entrance. Sandalwood would be the Indian promotion, Chanel perfumes, unmistakably Paris. Aromatherapy was, and I guess still is, Bloomie's secret weapon. It can easily be yours. Read on...

Camille Hoheb

Global Wellness Day (GWD) is an international, noncommercial initiative aimed at improving well-being across the world. Today, there are 3,000 locations in 100 countries organizing GWD celebrations worldwide. This article is part 2 of a 2-part series. Part-1 featured Belgin Aksoy, Founder of GWD. As a new Ambassador to Global Wellness Day, I was motivated to write a series about GWD for several reasons. 1) To create awareness and excitement about wellness as a lifestyle and as a business strategy 2) To promote wellness to the hotel industry 3) To share insights from hospitality professionals that have direct involvement with Global Wellness Day in order to encourage greater participation 4) To provide several first-hand accounts about GWD that could be helpful in spurring support from other sectors. Read on...

Judy Singer

In 1983, HFD became the first full-service spa consulting company in the US. Our mission was to develop, plan, market and manage spas primarily for up-scale hotels, resorts and mixed-use developments. Our focus was to create spas that appealed to guests, staff, lodging operators, developers and investors. We created the blueprint for what we called the "business of spas." We wanted all our clients to have spas that would be profit centers in and of themselves as well as tangible assets to the company's "core" business of selling hotel rooms and real estate. Read on...

Paula J. Azevedo

In an era of where the words personal, experiential, adventure, extreme and destination are often heard - at least among those of us in the business of hotels - it is clear consumers are seeking uniqueness in their travels, whether they are for business or pleasure. Hoteliers are wisely taking this to heart and responding to these demands. One way owners and operators are strategically meeting guests' needs is by tapping into and elevating the experience of a once luxury-only amenity: the spa. The focus makes logical sense. Read on...

Michael Koethner

A collection of data, but not in the old-fashioned, very outdated and very boring numbers approach; rather with a compassionate view on how the industry will evolve, beyond the veil, in the very near future. Let's have a look at how to create a visionary, functional and operational double treatment room that is designed, professionally organized and set-up in such a manner as to fulfill the therapist's performance requirements and to accompany the demands of the new market, as well as the future guests' expectations. It will be crucial to include all aspects from the inside out. Read on...

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Coming up in August 2019...

Food & Beverage: Millennial Chefs Lead the Way

Led by Millennial chefs, hotels continue to foster sustainability, sourcing and wellness within their dining rooms and banquet spaces, and by all measures, this is responsible for an increase in their revenues. In many hotels, the food & beverage division contributes 50 per cent or more to hotel sales and they are currently experiencing double-digit growth. As a result, hotel owners are allocating an increasing amount of square footage for F&B operations. The biggest area of investment is in catering, which is thriving due to weddings, social events and business conferences. Hotels are also investing in on-site market or convenience stores that offer fresh/refrigerated foods, and buffet concepts also continue to expand. Other popular food trends include a rise of fermented offerings such as kombucha, kimchi, sauerkraut, tempeh, kefir and pickles - all to produce the least processed food possible, and to boost probiotics to improve the immune system. Tea is also enjoying something of a renaissance. More people are thinking of tea with the same reverence as coffee due to its many varieties, applications and benefits. Craft tea blending, nitro tea on tap and even tea cocktails are beginning to appear on some hotel menus. Another trend concerns creating a unique, individualized and memorable experience for guests. This could be a small consumable item that is specific to a property or event, such as house-made snack mixes, gourmet popcorn, macaroons, or jars of house-made jams, chutneys, and mustards -all produced and customized in house. One staple that is in decline is the in-room minibar which seems to have fallen out of favor. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document the trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.