Library Archives

 
Rick Garlick

In today's political climate, taking strong stands can work for or against a business, just as it can for a Hollywood celebrity. While many consumers embrace brands that hold activist positions, there is an equal and opposite reaction for others. If you are a hotel brand, is corporate activism a good idea? This article will examine the arguments for and against it, including examples of hotel companies choosing to lead the charge – and four ways to consider taking action that could add value to your brand. Read on...

Bill Duncan

What does it mean to be a sustainable hotel company? Saying you're green is one thing, but implementing developmental and operational strategies that truly work towards achieving a healthier planet is another. For Hilton, being a sustainable hotel company starts with development and continues throughout the entire lifespan of every property within our portfolio. We leverage innovative construction and design concepts to operate in more efficient and eco-friendly ways – from modular building, to utilizing sustainable building materials and focusing on brand standards that have helped us earn triple International Standards Organization (ISO) certification for our entire portfolio of 5,600+ hotels globally-the largest certified ISO portfolio in the world. Hilton has also developed a global Corporate Responsibility strategy, Travel with Purpose, with initiatives such as LightStay, Soap Recycling and much more in order to ensure our properties remain sustainable well past their opening date. Hilton hotels are cutting down their environmental footprints from the ground-up, from the inside-out, with every team member from the top-down involved in the effort. Here's how we are doing it. Read on...

Michael Hess

When handling waste and recycling management, many hotel executives have likely come to realize that there are a lot of misconceptions out there about how to handle trash and recycling in the hospitality industry. The truth is, it can be difficult to determine what's fact and what's fiction. So, we wanted to set the record straight by addressing some of the common waste myths and misconceptions taking up precious, unwanted space between hotel owner and operators' ears – and provide hotel executives with the real truths that lie behind them. Read on...

Michael Hess

As a hotel owner and operator, you must consistently stay on top of new trends and regulations for your properties-and how those factors can impact every part of your business. One area of new territory many U.S. hotel executives are dealing with is handling organics. Dealing with organics in an effective way is quickly becoming not only a requirement across most of the country, but a new fresh idea that can produce economic and environmental savings across all your hotel operations. Read on...

Michael Hess

While some hotel executives may manage only one hotel operation, most owners and operators oversee hotel chains big and small. Executives have a large order of tasks, employees, guests and more to keep straight-all while keeping the bigger picture in mind to ensure steady revenue and growth. Having a cohesive data system is of utmost importance whether managing hotel chains or singular locations-from a revenue, profits, employee and guest standpoint. One area that often gets overlooked but can greatly impact your bottom line is waste management. Read on...

Pete Pearson

Food waste wastes money. In the US alone, we waste more than $160 billion worth of food each year. Reducing waste is a perfect example of how more sustainable business practices can sustain people, planet, and prosperity all at the same time. The food waste debate often focuses on how to keep waste out of landfills by diverting it to people, animals or compost (in that order). That's a worthwhile goal, but it's not the best way to save money-or the planet. Rather, preventing food waste is the most effective way to save money and the environment. Read on...

Michael Hess

A haven for road warriors, a temporary home for traveling families, a site for trade shows and conferences-hotels are all of these things and so much more. For most people, waste is waste no matter the shape or size and, in the end, it all winds up in the dumpster. But for the smart hotel owner and operator, that's not always the case. Working with a proper waste broker, knowing where your hotel waste comes from and identifying key areas to focus on can greatly increase your operational cleaning efficiencies while simultaneously reducing time and stress, and helping you save costs. While there is a myriad of facets to hotel waste management, here are four key areas of waste management that are worthy of immediate attention. Read on...

Pete Pearson

The business case for reducing food waste is simple: Saving food saves money. WWF and other organizations have conducted research across dozens of different hotels that found curbing food waste delivers material returns on investment. In one three-year study, the average hotel reaped $7 for every dollar it invested in food waste reduction. WWF found that hotels could save money within weeks of implementing new food waste policies and practices. Hotels that addressed food waste also enjoyed improved staff morale and customer service. Read on...

Michael Hess

The uniqueness of your hotel’s offerings helps your property stand out in a crowded hospitality marketplace but could result in additional headaches when considering the best way to dispose of these goods. Hotel guests adore the varied accoutrements offered by accommodations big and small around the globe. But keeping an edge on in-room swag results in other considerations and complications—even when it comes time to trash the discarded leftovers. What are the most cost-effective, efficient and environmentally friendly practices when recycling amenity items guests leave behind? Here are 10 of the best ways to recycle. Read on...

Michael Hess

Your team works hard to be a go-to destination for travelers. But attracting more visitors also results in increased waste, which impacts your bottom line. When managing your properties’ waste output, how can your team lower your environmental footprint while keeping costs low and efficiencies high? The answer is in the data: taking advantage of the newest technology will help your cost savings—and your sanity. Taking advantage of technology by connecting with the cloud, digging deep with data, improving with the Internet of Things and managing multilocation needs are the key pillars to waste management for the hospitality industry. Read on...

Pete Pearson

Food waste claims one of every three calories produced. From an environmental point of view, it's a waste of land, water, and energy. For hotels, it's a waste of money. While reducing food waste is a simple concept, getting started can seem a logistical challenge. To help hotels develop and implement an effective food waste plan, World Wildlife Fund and the American Hotel and Lodging Association worked with dozens of hotels to test strategies and develop a free resource, HotelKitchen.org. By laying out simple steps, the toolkit can help hotels start saving food and money today. Read on...

Pete Pearson

For hotels, saving money can also help save the environment. They've done it with water, and now they can do so with another vital resource: food. About a third of all the world's food is lost or wasted, representing huge economic, social, and environmental costs. To help the hotel industry tackle this problem, World Wildlife Fund and the American Hotel and Lodging Association have developed an engagement platform and set of tools on HotelKitchen.org to provide hotels with a step-by-step guide to reduce food waste, cut costs, and enhance relationships with their staff, guests, and community. Read on...

Maricha Ellis

As hotels continue to focus on their sustainability efforts, the importance of proper hazardous waste management cannot be overlooked. Proper management of hazardous waste is crucial to maintaining a hotel's brand reputation, remaining compliant with government regulations and being a good steward to the environment. There are many best practices to follow when handling hazardous waste, and a foundational understanding of the regulations defining what constitutes hazardous waste is key to laying the groundwork for a proper waste management program. Let's take a look at what you need to know… Read on...

Sarah Lucas

A decade ago it might have been socially acceptable to swim with dolphins in a hotel pool. But those days are gone. Now posting a holiday pic posing with Flipper is hugely controversial. Just ask reality TV star Kim Kardashian, who found herself in hot water after swimming with dolphins in Mexico. Or Real Housewives' Bethany Frankel, who copped a wave of social media criticism for visiting Atlantis Paradise Island's Dolphin Cay in August. Read on...

Maricha Ellis

With the summer storm season upon us, it's especially important for hotels to be prepared for hazardous waste emergencies caused by severe weather. Preparation for such events is crucial for safely and compliantly handling emergency spills. Not only is proactive planning for environmental emergencies valuable from a compliance standpoint, but it can help minimize the damage inflicted within your hotel and the surrounding area, as well as reduce the risk to the health of your guests and staff members. Read on...

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Coming up in October 2019...

Revenue Management: Focus On Profit

Revenue Management is still a relatively new profession within hotel operations and as such, it continues to evolve. One significant trend in this area is a shift away from using revenue as the foundation to generate key performance indicators (KPIs) and to instead place the emphasis on profit. Traditionally, revenue managers have relied on total revenue per available room (TrevPAR) and revenue per available room (RevPAR) as the basis of their KPIs. Now, some revenue managers are using gross operating profit per available room (GOPPAR) as their primary KPI. This puts profit at the center of revenue management strategy, and managers are increasingly searching for new ways to increase the profitability of their hotels. Return on Investment is the objective of any hotel investment, so it is only logical that profitability and ROI will be emphasized going forward. Another trend is an expanded focus on direct hotel bookings. Revenue managers know that one way to increase profitability is to steer guests away from online travel agencies (OTAs) and book directly with the hotel. This tactic also reinforces brand identity and loyalty, and encourages repeat business. In addition, it provides a valuable platform to market the hotel directly to the customer, and to upsell room upgrades or other services to them. Another trend for revenue managers involves automation in their software programs. Revenue management systems with automation are far more desirable than those without it. Automating data entry and logistics increases efficiency, allowing managers to spend more time on formulating strategy. As a bonus, an automated system helps with aggregating and interpreting data. The October issue of the Hotel Business Review will address these developments and document how some leading hotels are executing their revenue management strategies.