Library Archives

 
Michael Hess

We live in a digital era fueled by connected devices and experiences. The Internet of Things (IoT) has completely transformed the way we live, work and play. This very concept funnels directly into the waste management industry. Enter the "internet of trash," where technology is designed to help you solve your waste and recycling challenges while making your program more efficient and sustainable for the long term. New innovations can help you keep your hotel waste program in tip-top shape and positively impact your bottom line. Read on...

Megan Morikawa

Iberostar Group leads with purpose in its pursuit to set the standard for responsible tourism. Its commitment to preserving the environment and protecting the oceans surrounding its properties is consolidated through Wave of Change, Iberostar's pioneering initiative to move beyond plastics, promote the responsible consumption of seafood and improve coastal health. This year, the company opened a land-based coral lab in Dominican Republic to help protect essential ocean life from rising global temperatures in the future-and defend against a new fast-moving coral pandemic. Iberostar Group is a 100% family-owned Spanish multinational company with more than 60 years of history. Read on...

Michael Jacobson

Illinois hotels and their restaurant, banquet and spa outlets are – more than ever – dedicating resources to establish eco-friendly practices that aim to preserve our environment. There is an abundance of ways hotels are being mindful in their everyday business practices, including initiatives ranging from monitoring for energy and water efficiency to reducing plastics, crafting sustainable wine lists and even placing used furniture with those in need. As one of the Illinois Hotel & Lodging Association's core platforms, we explore how hotels nationwide can implement thoughtful, sustainable and turnkey practices as exemplified by others leading the way in this critical effort. Read on...

Michael Hess

Today, almost everything we use is driven by technology. This includes your hotel's waste management program: Enter the smart waste compactor. The goal of a compactor is to condense waste to optimize the space for everyday trash disposal. A smart waste compactor takes this the next level and delivers a real-time, cloud-based dashboard to give you the insights about your compactor you need to better understand your hotel's waste usage. We wanted to give you a rundown of the key benefits of a smart waste compactor on your hotel and how it can make your hotel's waste management program smarter. Read on...

Rick Garlick

In today's political climate, taking strong stands can work for or against a business, just as it can for a Hollywood celebrity. While many consumers embrace brands that hold activist positions, there is an equal and opposite reaction for others. If you are a hotel brand, is corporate activism a good idea? This article will examine the arguments for and against it, including examples of hotel companies choosing to lead the charge – and four ways to consider taking action that could add value to your brand. Read on...

Bill Duncan

What does it mean to be a sustainable hotel company? Saying you're green is one thing, but implementing developmental and operational strategies that truly work towards achieving a healthier planet is another. For Hilton, being a sustainable hotel company starts with development and continues throughout the entire lifespan of every property within our portfolio. We leverage innovative construction and design concepts to operate in more efficient and eco-friendly ways – from modular building, to utilizing sustainable building materials and focusing on brand standards that have helped us earn triple International Standards Organization (ISO) certification for our entire portfolio of 5,600+ hotels globally-the largest certified ISO portfolio in the world. Hilton has also developed a global Corporate Responsibility strategy, Travel with Purpose, with initiatives such as LightStay, Soap Recycling and much more in order to ensure our properties remain sustainable well past their opening date. Hilton hotels are cutting down their environmental footprints from the ground-up, from the inside-out, with every team member from the top-down involved in the effort. Here's how we are doing it. Read on...

Michael Hess

When handling waste and recycling management, many hotel executives have likely come to realize that there are a lot of misconceptions out there about how to handle trash and recycling in the hospitality industry. The truth is, it can be difficult to determine what's fact and what's fiction. So, we wanted to set the record straight by addressing some of the common waste myths and misconceptions taking up precious, unwanted space between hotel owner and operators' ears – and provide hotel executives with the real truths that lie behind them. Read on...

Michael Hess

As a hotel owner and operator, you must consistently stay on top of new trends and regulations for your properties-and how those factors can impact every part of your business. One area of new territory many U.S. hotel executives are dealing with is handling organics. Dealing with organics in an effective way is quickly becoming not only a requirement across most of the country, but a new fresh idea that can produce economic and environmental savings across all your hotel operations. Read on...

Michael Hess

While some hotel executives may manage only one hotel operation, most owners and operators oversee hotel chains big and small. Executives have a large order of tasks, employees, guests and more to keep straight-all while keeping the bigger picture in mind to ensure steady revenue and growth. Having a cohesive data system is of utmost importance whether managing hotel chains or singular locations-from a revenue, profits, employee and guest standpoint. One area that often gets overlooked but can greatly impact your bottom line is waste management. Read on...

Pete Pearson

Food waste wastes money. In the US alone, we waste more than $160 billion worth of food each year. Reducing waste is a perfect example of how more sustainable business practices can sustain people, planet, and prosperity all at the same time. The food waste debate often focuses on how to keep waste out of landfills by diverting it to people, animals or compost (in that order). That's a worthwhile goal, but it's not the best way to save money-or the planet. Rather, preventing food waste is the most effective way to save money and the environment. Read on...

Michael Hess

A haven for road warriors, a temporary home for traveling families, a site for trade shows and conferences-hotels are all of these things and so much more. For most people, waste is waste no matter the shape or size and, in the end, it all winds up in the dumpster. But for the smart hotel owner and operator, that's not always the case. Working with a proper waste broker, knowing where your hotel waste comes from and identifying key areas to focus on can greatly increase your operational cleaning efficiencies while simultaneously reducing time and stress, and helping you save costs. While there is a myriad of facets to hotel waste management, here are four key areas of waste management that are worthy of immediate attention. Read on...

Pete Pearson

The business case for reducing food waste is simple: Saving food saves money. WWF and other organizations have conducted research across dozens of different hotels that found curbing food waste delivers material returns on investment. In one three-year study, the average hotel reaped $7 for every dollar it invested in food waste reduction. WWF found that hotels could save money within weeks of implementing new food waste policies and practices. Hotels that addressed food waste also enjoyed improved staff morale and customer service. Read on...

Michael Hess

The uniqueness of your hotel’s offerings helps your property stand out in a crowded hospitality marketplace but could result in additional headaches when considering the best way to dispose of these goods. Hotel guests adore the varied accoutrements offered by accommodations big and small around the globe. But keeping an edge on in-room swag results in other considerations and complications—even when it comes time to trash the discarded leftovers. What are the most cost-effective, efficient and environmentally friendly practices when recycling amenity items guests leave behind? Here are 10 of the best ways to recycle. Read on...

Michael Hess

Your team works hard to be a go-to destination for travelers. But attracting more visitors also results in increased waste, which impacts your bottom line. When managing your properties’ waste output, how can your team lower your environmental footprint while keeping costs low and efficiencies high? The answer is in the data: taking advantage of the newest technology will help your cost savings—and your sanity. Taking advantage of technology by connecting with the cloud, digging deep with data, improving with the Internet of Things and managing multilocation needs are the key pillars to waste management for the hospitality industry. Read on...

Pete Pearson

Food waste claims one of every three calories produced. From an environmental point of view, it's a waste of land, water, and energy. For hotels, it's a waste of money. While reducing food waste is a simple concept, getting started can seem a logistical challenge. To help hotels develop and implement an effective food waste plan, World Wildlife Fund and the American Hotel and Lodging Association worked with dozens of hotels to test strategies and develop a free resource, HotelKitchen.org. By laying out simple steps, the toolkit can help hotels start saving food and money today. Read on...

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Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.