Library Archives

 
Lawrence Adams

Research in the hotel industry takes many forms. Sustainable systems and materials, enhanced security, life safety and marketing are all subjects where research is called for to advance each discipline. Marriott undertook an extensive research project in the process of inventing the Courtyard brand. In this article we review three research projects and the methodologies they employed to arrive at actionable results. READ MORE

Lesley Hughes-Wyman

A few months have passed since the initial outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, but hotel designers and hospitality brands continue to navigate the future of the hotel industry. Leaders are redefining what 'safety' looks like, where 'clean' is becoming the new 'green.' Lesley Hughes-Wyman examines how a focus on antimicrobial materials-and communicating their specification to guests-will become more prevalent than ever before. READ MORE

Bruce Wright

Will hotels of the future be operated by a robotic workforce? New doesn't automatically mean futuristic and hi-tech doesn't necessarily translate to visionary. People have an innate need for human touch and community especially in times of crisis when physical connection is off-limits. A completely contactless hospitality experience isn't a long-term solution, but how do we find the proverbial 'sweet spot' between high-tech and human touch? READ MORE

Eric Price

The COVID-19 pandemic has businesses considering large-scale reconstruction and redesign to help combat the spread of the virus and protect against future health crises. Destination hot-spots are considering how best to protect their future customers. What might the hotel redesign process look like? How much could it cost, and how long might it take? How can hotels best utilize open space and fresh air going forward? READ MORE

John Tess

The changing economy has resulted in underutilized and vacated modern office towers in downtowns across the country. Many of these 50-year-old office buildings, with their beneficial design, location, floor plans, and materials, have been rehabilitated into hotels and apartments. HRI Properties' adaptive reuse of Aloft New Orleans Downtown presented a tremendous opportunity for the rehabilitation of mid-century modern architecture. READ MORE

David Kasprak

Times change, styles change, places change. Yet some things remain. Over the last three hundred years we have seen the lodging industry morph from a smattering of mom-and-pop inns into multi-billion-dollar sector of the world economy. We've have seen the modest roadside pub give way to the grand hotels of the early 20th century, the business-class hotel, and sprawling resorts worldwide. Yet through all the changes there remains a constant; The Hotel Lobby, and with it the bar and restaurant. READ MORE

Bruce McEvoy

A chance to escape to an artfully conceived hotel with flawless service seems like a distant memory today. The entire world is dealing with the impact of COVID-19 and our hospitality industry has been ground to a halt. We're entering the transition that follows every crisis and we must address ways to become resilient and anticipate the impact of unforeseeable disruptions. As designers, we need to be empathetic to these times and build strategies into our vision of the future of business travel and societal changes. READ MORE

Manny Dominguez

While the coronavirus pandemic paused travel worldwide, the crisis has not paused wanderlust or human needs for connection. As guests begin to resume travel plans – whether for business or leisure – they will bring new expectations for health and wellbeing with them, from the use of hands-free technology to a connection to the outdoors to a holistic approach to programming. Manny Dominguez, principal at global design firm Cooper Carry, outlines how design-oriented solutions and strategic modifications will usher in the next era of hospitality, where a strong commitment to wellness serves as a new gold standard for the industry. READ MORE

Lawrence Adams

The coronavirus pandemic continues to have a devastating impact on the hospitality industry. Designers and Architects will be challenged to find ways to make guests feel comfortable, safe and free from exposure to pathogens, while at the same time creating an invigorating and meaningful hospitality experience. The new normal in hotel design will need to use touchless technology to overcome the inherent danger of virus spreading from potentially infected surfaces to guests and hotel staff. Advancements in smart phone applications, facial recognition, voice commands, motion detection, heat sensors and virtual reality will be employed to create an enduring sense of safety in the hospitality environment. READ MORE

Tom Bergerson

The hospitality industry exists to serve the intrinsic human desire to gather, celebrate and rejuvenate. This fact has driven hotel architects for the past several decades to place continual emphasis on the design and creation of evocative communal spaces. Today, the hospitality industry finds itself faced with an enormous challenge: in the wake of COVID-19, people no longer feel safe in public areas. Tom Bergerson, Principal at architectural services firm AO, offers solutions and insights on how the industry can continue to provide comfort, convenience, and social interaction while providing guests with a sense of safety and well-being. READ MORE

David Ashen

Creating a hotel brand that resonates means far more than designing an eye-catching logo and putting together a style guide. A brand should evoke a feeling, according to David Ashen, president & CEO of interior design and brand consulting firm dash design. In this article, he explores how hotels can imagine a dynamic environment and a service culture that, alongside sharp design, creates magic that few brands have yet to fully tap. Most of all, Ashen implores hoteliers to define if they are a head, heart or gut brand and to bravely lead from that revelation. READ MORE

Scott Lee

The rise of coronavirus has reset our rhythm as humans, and in slowing down and sheltering in place, we have had time to notice natural features in our surroundings and get back to basics. Social distancing may seem at odds with hospitality, but hotels can learn from the mindful and wellness-oriented activities people are using to ground and reset, from gardening and taking walks, to home cooking and baking, artistic pursuits and wholesome family activities. How might designers shape the 21st guest experience with spaces that nurture guests' inner worlds and push them past comfort zones, reaching deeper into nature? READ MORE

John Tess

Traditionally, downtowns have served as the commercial and entertainment centers of the city. Between the shops and restaurants, the local hotels provided a space for people to socialize and recline. In the present, the historic hotels of the traditional downtown have continued the legacy of providing a social space for locals and tourists alike. The modern parallel includes offering event spaces for parties and weddings. The Adelphi Hotel in Saratoga Springs, New York, one of the last surviving examples of the typical Saratoga Springs hotel from the resort town's zenith in the late-19th century, is an example. READ MORE

Lawrence Adams

Hostels have significantly evolved since their inception in 1914. While many of their basic hospitality features remain the same, namely providing inexpensive lodging to mostly young travelers in locations and settings conducive to social interaction and cultural enrichment, they have now taken on features that are comparable to stylish boutique hotels. Many of the new hostels are beautifully designed with amenities that attract locals to enjoy music, food, cocktails, art and invigorating social interaction with its guests. Similarly Micro Hotels provide inexpensive lodging compared to their counterparts and feature miniaturized but well-appointed guestrooms, focusing investment dollars on high design and dynamic public spaces that attract guests and locals alike to engage in robust social interaction. READ MORE

David Kasprak

The hotel lobby has served the same basic purposes for hundreds of years: sustenance, socializing, and doing business. What has changed over time is the way we do all three. With recent technology strides, today's hotel lobby is transforming, and perhaps not in the way you might think. Travelers are forgoing the grand formality of the former heart of the hotel in exchange for something that feels like home. As we look back through time, we can see how innovation has shaped the evolution of the hotel lobby. Better yet, we can start to think about how it will continue to morph into the future. READ MORE

Show Per Page
1 2 3 ... 11
Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.