Library Archives

 
Derrick Garrett

Digging deep into many of the complexities of creating successful music architecture solutions, we can move into the future of guest experiences. To me, that means bundling the music content service with the audio and video integration. AV technology today has the potential to be so much more than background music and a screen with static information. There are endless opportunities with the latest technology to drive the guest experience and engagement in innovative and unforgettable ways. Read on...

John Tess

Bill Kimpton formed Kimpton Hotels in the 1980s with the intent to create smaller guest-centric urban properties in older and historic buildings. Conceptually, the company took a three pronged approach with property development, hospitality management and on-property restaurant management. Over the next three decades, the brand expanded nationally and internationally while holding on to its roots. In 2015, IHG acquired the hotel and restaurant management operations, while the development arm became independent. The intent is that the strength of IHG would facilitate expansion of the Kimpton brand, while independence would foster greater returns for the property investors. Read on...

Felicia Hyde

From culinary to cultural to artistic activities, modern day travelers are in search of the "live-like-a-local" experience. Gone are the days where five-star accommodations and best-in-class-service are the must-haves; now, travelers are on the hunt for unique and personalized destinations and the opportunity for cultural immersion. Backed by research, consumers are relating positive travel experiences to destinations that promote self-discovery and activities that fuel the mind, body and soul. With these trends already shaking up multifamily communities nationwide, hoteliers should consider applying the following design strategies to turn their hotel properties into experience-driven destinations. Read on...

David Ashen

Inspiration can be found in the most unexpected places. For instance, senior living facilities are taking their design cues from the hospitality industry, which is not unlike what we have seen in the development of luxury high rise living in the last decade. David Ashen, president & CEO of interior design and brand consulting firm dash design, relays the ways senior living developers are applying lessons learned from the hotel industry to create unique experiences in the senior living space, using case studies to demonstrate how they are realizing innovative public spaces and programing. Read on...

Lawrence Adams

Hotels and resorts have increasingly become targets of terrorist attacks. Ease of access to facilities that are designed to promote welcoming hospitality to its guests and visitors make securing hotels against attacks a difficult challenge. Terrorist regard hotels and resorts as "target-rich" since guests in luxury lodging are typically affluent and potentially politically influential. Recent attacks emphatically demonstrate that today's hotel and resort security systems need to focus not only on petty criminals and intruders bent on theft, vandalism, arson or personal assaults, but must employ cutting edge technology in early threat detection of potential terrorist attacks. Read on...

Andrew Simmons

Hotels, much like any other consumer product, can differ drastically from one another. While hotels used to attempt to cater to the traveler simply seeking a place to sleep at night, they must now cater to a wide range of demographics with varying needs and wanted elements in a hotel. Leisure travel is becoming increasingly multigenerational, which can be attributed to the changing dynamic of the American household. The hospitality industry is being pushed towards a more inclusive and experiential design, allowing those of all ages and backgrounds to experience and enjoy all that the local environment has to offer. Read on...

David Ashen

In order to compete for market share in the luxury hotel world, owners and operators need to think beyond design and more about experience. What are some things hoteliers should consider in bringing a unique guest stay to life? David Ashen, president & CEO of interior design and brand consulting firm dash design, explores ways to utilize unusual and bespoke amenities – from VIP backstage experiences to tricked out gear garages -- to differentiate one hotel brand from another and more fully speak the luxury language of today's savvy traveler. Read on...

John Tess

There is a perception that lodging brand standards conflict with the development of historic buildings into hotels. This is more of a past problem than a current one. Well-located downtown land is becoming scarce, hotel brands are getting experienced in working with historic buildings, and market demands are fostering niche-driven brands that seek local connections. One great example is Baton Rouge's Watermark Hotel under Marriott's Autograph brand. This 1925 one-time bank headquarters 12-story skyscraper was transformed into a modern hotel balancing the unique and local qualities of the building with the need for a upscale hotel experience. Read on...

Jerry Merriman

The Statler opened in 1956 as a 1001-room hotel, convention center, and gathering place for the "Who's Who" to lodge when visiting Dallas. Notable guests include Conrad Hilton, Coco Chanel, Liberace, Tony Bennett, The Jackson 5, and Tina Turner. The hotel had its last occupancy in 2001 and was listed on the National Park Service "Top Ten Most Endangered Building" list. After many failed redevelopment attempts, Centurion American acquired The Statler and historically renovated and reimagined the building as a true mixed-use project. The building now features a 159-room Curio Collection hotel and 219 luxury rental apartments and was recently inducted into Historic Hotels of America. Read on...

Derrick Garrett

Just as the days of endless, tasteless buffets are gone from the all-inclusive resort experience, so are the endless, thoughtless playlists that come from the on-property sound systems. The à la carte restaurant approach that has become common place at all-inclusive hotels needs to be applied to music in the hotel industry. We'll take a look at how much music has evolved in the hospitality world and what needs to happen for it to come full circle as part of the branding and upfront story. Music is an important driver when it comes to the guest experience and the bottom line. Read on...

David Ashen

A rising renaissance in the roadside motel has prompted a growing trend in the transformation of the formerly dated designs to reinvented brands for the modern traveler. Building on nostalgia, the millennials' desire for authenticity and romance combined with wanderlust, David Ashen, principal and founder of interior design and brand consulting firm dash design, explores some of the more interesting trends in this category, including, for instance, the conversion of a typical Super 8 motel into an independent and funky property offering local and unique experiences that pay homage to the brand's past while highlighting today's conveniences and tastes. Read on...

Lawrence Adams

The explosive increase of hotel brands in recent years has reached an astounding level. Smith Travel Research recently listed 1,073 brands globally. Of the major hotel companies, Marriott, following its merger with Starwood, has accumulated 30 brands; Hilton has 14 brands, AccorHotels has 34 and InterContinental Hotel Group (IHG) has 14. New independent brands continue to pop up at a rapid rate fueled in large part by the insatiable appetite of millennials for new and unique experiences in their lodging choices. In this article we explore the advantages and disadvantages of brand proliferation and look at some of the unique new brands in some detail to understand their appeal. Read on...

John Tess

A quarter of the population, millennials are increasingly a targeted hotel consumer. Boutique hotels historically presented an alternative to standardized chain. Their edge however has been eroded by the arrival of soft brands, such as the Marriott Autograph and Hilton Curio. Portland, Oregon-based Provenance Hotels, with 2,500 rooms under its control, attempts to expand on the boutique hotel by creating a truly unique place. As envisioned by its President, Bashar Wali, Provenance Hotels defines its audience as "forward thinking creatives" and sees its opportunity by smaller-scale properties that provide a more handcrafted or curated approach to design, operation and experience Read on...

Cristine Henderson

Whether you love them, or love to hate them, millennials are often characterized as disruptors across many industries. This generation has definitely made its mark on the hotel industry, especially where design is concerned. Known for innovation, affinity to technology, and often associated with the advent of social media, millennials are making changes throughout the consumer landscape. Read ahead to see how all these characteristics are translating into the future of our industry. And don't worry, short-term rental services are not quite the death sentence they are painted to be. From selfies to sleek finishes, millennials are shaking things up. Read on...

Kurt Meister

Managing any hotel renovation requires management of a myriad of issues: budgets, deadlines, contractors, expectations and ongoing services to name a few. What often isn't top of mind in the early stages of a renovation is a plan to manage the inherent risk. This article addresses nine considerations every hotel operator needs to prioritize at the start of any renovation project. In fact, these nine considerations must take higher priority over your other considerations. Why? Because if you botch any of these nine considerations, many if not all of those other priorities mentioned above will be negatively impacted. Read on...

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Coming up in October 2019...

Revenue Management: Focus On Profit

Revenue Management is still a relatively new profession within hotel operations and as such, it continues to evolve. One significant trend in this area is a shift away from using revenue as the foundation to generate key performance indicators (KPIs) and to instead place the emphasis on profit. Traditionally, revenue managers have relied on total revenue per available room (TrevPAR) and revenue per available room (RevPAR) as the basis of their KPIs. Now, some revenue managers are using gross operating profit per available room (GOPPAR) as their primary KPI. This puts profit at the center of revenue management strategy, and managers are increasingly searching for new ways to increase the profitability of their hotels. Return on Investment is the objective of any hotel investment, so it is only logical that profitability and ROI will be emphasized going forward. Another trend is an expanded focus on direct hotel bookings. Revenue managers know that one way to increase profitability is to steer guests away from online travel agencies (OTAs) and book directly with the hotel. This tactic also reinforces brand identity and loyalty, and encourages repeat business. In addition, it provides a valuable platform to market the hotel directly to the customer, and to upsell room upgrades or other services to them. Another trend for revenue managers involves automation in their software programs. Revenue management systems with automation are far more desirable than those without it. Automating data entry and logistics increases efficiency, allowing managers to spend more time on formulating strategy. As a bonus, an automated system helps with aggregating and interpreting data. The October issue of the Hotel Business Review will address these developments and document how some leading hotels are executing their revenue management strategies.