Library Archives

 
Stephen Jacobs

'Urban Resorts' are among the top trends in hospitality design right now, catering to people looking to escape to the city, rather than away from it. Urban Resorts offer the best of everything, allowing guests to stay in the urban core, while getting that sense of suburban retreat, with designs that bring the outdoors in, lots of natural light, rooftop amenities, sustainability and more. In a city like Toronto, which is at the forefront of North American tourism, we wanted to invite guests to feel like they're at the center of the excitement, without feeling like they couldn't escape it. Read on...

Alan Roberts

Whether developing a hotel in a major metropolis or rural town, the key to success is a collaborative effort between the hotel brand and ownership group that infuses flexibility and open communication at every stage. Alan Roberts, global head of Embassy Suites by Hilton, and Gregory Steinhauer, president of American Life, Inc., discuss how they worked together to marry out-of-the-box thinking with proven Embassy Suites' best practices when developing the Embassy Suites by Hilton Seattle Pioneer Square. The result is a customized and high-performing property that stays true to both its location and brand standards, delighting guests by delivering the amenities they have come to expect with unique locally-inspired flair. Read on...

Jackson Thilenius

Why should we consider hostels a hot new market? With the rise of the sharing economy and the power of millennial spending, there is a lot to unpack as to why hostels are thriving in this economy. Beyond being a growing trend, hostels are quickly driving more market share as they become a "go-to" for today's generation of savvy travelers who will spend less so that they can travel more without sacrificing value-based amenities they rely on. Jackson Thilenius, Principal at Retail Design Collaborative, elaborates. Read on...

David Ashen

With hoteliers' attention split between the boomer generations' affinity for luxury and the younger guest's preference for high technology and social interaction, David Ashen, principal and founder of interior design and brand consulting firm dash design, explores how hoteliers are catering to each group, separately-including trendy rooftop bars and combination bar/lobby areas for the younger set and refined restaurants and luxurious amenities for boomer guests-and the importance of flexible design elements to balance guest wants and needs across generations. Read on...

Ray Chung

Hotels today can and should use F&B to establish a unique personality. As guests increasingly look to bar and dining experiences for entertainment, hotels can take advantage of their venues to express themselves and leave a lasting impression. Restaurants, bars and even the event catering service can define a hotel as local, unique, lively and entertaining. To be competitive and ensure success in the long run, hotels should pay close attention to guest preferences, the design of F&B areas and the culture of the region and neighborhood, always striving to be original. Read on...

Cristine Henderson

Site integration is a crucial step in designing a hotel and, when applied appropriately, has the power to impact guest satisfaction as well as the owner's business objectives and can even translate into a real value and return on investment. In this article, Cristine Henderson, AIA, NCARB, Associate Vice President at Hoefer Wysocki, shares the most important considerations when applying site integration in a hotel's design. Considerations include designing to increase the building's overall visibility and accessibility, while incorporating local inspiration and environmental influences. A designer's skills, creativity and mindfulness produce opportunities to build hotel interiors and exteriors that reflect and make use of local surroundings and enhance the overall guest experience. Read on...

Scott Acton

Form and function are two critical components of building design. That statement might be a no-brainer for some, but we often fail to connect how this relates to our experience of a space. It's safe to say we have all reaped the benefits of experiential design, but it was most likely unknowingly. Scott Acton, CEO and founder of Forte Specialty Contractors, shares his thoughts on experiential design and how its changing the hospitality and entertainment sector. Read on...

David Dionne

In an ever-increasingly competitive hospitality marketplace, owners and operators look to enhance their competitive advantage by providing uniquely positive, memorable experiences. Hotel and resort owners and operators agree that a hospitality brand holds the potential to create such novel guest experiences through the amenities leaders select for the brand's identity. What is a really unique and novel amenity? A really great playground. What makes a great playground? A great playground stimulates a child's imagination, allows children to build confidence through experience and skill building opportunities and can be designed for kids of all abilities and ages. Read on...

Felicia Hyde

Biophilia, a love of life and the living world, continues to gain popularity in today’s modern built environment – especially as our population continues to urbanize. As a result, businesses, hotels and apartment communities across the world are incorporating biophilic design by infusing direct and indirect natural elements to create environments that promote health, wellness and productivity. While this design concept is already transforming the hotel industry, hoteliers can leverage design strategies from multifamily and residential communities to effectively create spaces that elevate the human-nature connection and guest experience to convert one-time guests into repeat visitors. Read on...

David Ashen

The quick pace of change in devices and systems powered by ever-advancing technology makes it a challenge when thinking about the design of a hotel. With today's hoteliers looking at innovative ways to incorporate rapidly changing advancements in technology in their properties to enhance customer experience and streamline energy consumption, David Ashen, founder and partner of interior design and brand consulting firm dash design, examines intelligent buildings and other forward-thinking hi-tech concepts leading the way in hotel design along with guest accommodation and amenities. The future is in smart or intelligent buildings and totally integrated systems that can do several things that enhance the guest experience and manage energy consumption, so costs are minimized. Read on...

John Tess

According to one report, millennials account for a third of all hotel guests world-wide; a number that is projected to increase to 50% by 2020. To attract this market, hotels need to focus on providing a unique experience, mixed with good design and aesthetics. Studies indicated that Millennials value unique, authentic, value-rich, community-based hotel properties. To meet this demand, boutique hotels as well as national chains are developing new properties specifically targeting this niche. At the same time, there are many hotel properties that embraced Millennial values as part of their business philosophy. One particular Pacific Northwest firm, McMenamins, was “millennial” before they were born. Read on...

Lawrence Adams

The design style, ambiance, services and amenities usually associated with hotels are finding their way into buildings and facilities other than hotels and resorts. Owners and operators of Hospitals, Senior Living Communities, Airports, Student Housing, Office Buildings and Residential Buildings are all finding that their users are demanding more in the way of a hospitality experience than their traditional, and often institutional, trappings provide. As with hospitality design the process for these other building types involves an approach that incorporates innovative design to please, delight and engage the intellect, creating environments that are experiential by nature. Read on...

Ray Chung

A well-designed floorplan is essential to a restaurant’s success. No matter how good the food is, it needs to be served efficiently and elegantly, and it is the floorplan that determines how well each service will run. The keys to a good plan lie in coordinating and balancing the needs of both the servers and the guests. From the location of the kitchen to the exact width of the seats, every decision matters. When done well, ADA requirements can benefit all guests, with gentle, sufficiently wide paths and ample space for strollers as well as wheelchairs. Read on...

Jackson Thilenius

Today’s guests, whether they are hotel or hospital guests, come with incredibly high expectations of hospitality. How does wellness fold into this equation and contribute to the overall guest experience? What does the future of hospitality and healthcare hold as it relates to the wellness factor? Jackson Thilenius, Principal at Retail Design Collaborative, explores the integration of these two disciplines and the implications for hospitality and healthcare brands sparked by the traction of the trillion-dollar wellness industry. Read on...

Scott Acton

Millennials have become the fastest growing consumer segment in the hospitality industry. They have also become one of the most discerning audiences, demanding authenticity, connection and social responsibility from the brands they invest in. Hospitality brands must now look at the entirety of their mix of products from the design aspects of their properties to how they are creating guest engagement and entertainment in order to attract new customers and keep current ones loyal. Scott Acton, CEO and founder of Forte Specialty Contractors breaks down how to design F&B for this new generation to create long-term loyalty. Read on...

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Coming up in July 2019...

Hotel Spa: Pursuing Distinction

The Wellness Movement continues to evolve and hotel spas continue to innovate in order to keep pace. Fueled by intense competition within the industry, hotel spas are seeking creative ways to differentiate themselves in the market. An increasing number of customers are searching for very specific, niche treatments that address their particular health concerns and, as a result, some leading spas have achieved distinction by offering only one specialized treatment. Meditation and mindfulness practices are becoming increasingly mainstream as are alternative treatments and therapies, such as Ayurvedic therapies, Reiki, energy work and salt therapy. Some spas specialize in stress management and offer lifestyle coaching sessions as part of their program.  Other spas are fully embracing new technologies as a way to differentiate themselves, such as providing wearable devices that track health and fitness biomarkers, or robots programmed with artificial intelligence to control spa environments, or virtual reality add-ons that transport guests to relaxing places around the world. Some spas have chosen to specialize in medical procedures such as liposuction, laser skin therapy, phototherapy facials, Botox and facial fillers, acupuncture and permanent hair removal, in addition to cosmetic body shaping procedures and  teeth whitening treatments. Similarly, other spas are offering comprehensive health check-ups and counseling services for those who are interested in disease prevention treatments. Finally, as hotel spas continue to become more diverse, accessible and specialized, there is a growing demand for health professionals with a specific area of expertise. There is a proliferation of top class, quality wellness practitioners who make a name for themselves by offering their services around the globe, including athletes, chefs, doctors, physical trainers and weight loss specialists. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will report on these trends and developments and examine how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.