Library Archives

 
Simon Hudson

An increasing number of hoteliers are embracing social media because of its potential for engagement and collaboration with networked consumers. Through social media, marketers can gain rich, unmediated consumer insights, faster than ever before. This article will focus on M Live APAC, Marriot's new Asia Pacific state-of-the-art marketing and brand newsroom command center, which has become the company's epicenter of real-time marketing to customers in the region. M Live APAC allows Marriott not only to seize more chances to engage with consumers quickly, but also to create memorable and shareable experiences. Read on...

Gary Kimball

Social media has become a primary channel for hotels to market their brand and for guests to share experiences, thus controlling and shaping the reputations of hotels large and small every day. In a crisis, social media can be a critical tool for keeping your customer base informed, but also for monitoring potentially damaging opinions and finding a resolution. Social media can help with real-time, responsive communications, understanding followers' concerns and swiftly allaying them with direct and transparent messaging. Read on...

Bernard Perrine

With more than 600 million Tweets sent daily, it's likely your next customer is on Twitter. The challenge for companies is making their Tweets stand out and building their business by capturing a greater share of the growing market using Twitter. An effective Tweet can boost business by creating the highest engagement with followers, while building a devoted fan base. And while what you say and how you construct a Tweet is important, building an effective Twitter program sets the stage for those all-important 140 characters or less communication. In this article I'll address ways to create an engaging presence on Twitter, as well as give you tips to make every Tweet count. Read on...

Janet Gerhard

We've all traversed the same bumpy social media path over the last several years. What can we anticipate for 2016? Is the battle for social dominance a worthy endeavor in light of the new disrupters taking headlines, and profits, from the hotel industry? What does it mean for the brands and our customers? Read on...

DJ Vallauri

People are used to being treated like crap. Have I gotten your attention? Let me explain further. We all "get" social media and understand how powerful platforms like Facebook, Twitter and others are vital in both building customer loyalty and engaging customers. With this in mind, hoteliers have come to understand that social media marketing is not free. While setting up accounts and pages on the social media networks are free, in order for the hotel's branding and visibility to benefit, it requires constant attention which costs money as it relates to hiring people to leverage the social media networks. Read on...

Jane Coloccia

If you were to ask consumer-facing companies where the greatest future opportunity lies in terms of engaging customers, a relatively high portion would point to the social space. In fact, more and more companies are investing greater amounts of their marketing dollars into social media. And, with good reason. Trend reports are continuing to show people are watching less and less television, and reading fewer print publications. If you want to influence today's consumer — aka your potential guest — you need to reach them where they are spending their downtime. And that, my friends, is with their mobile device. Read on...

Carolyn Murphy

For hotels, driving direct bookings is more critical than ever before. With Expedia's acquisition of Orbitz earlier this year, Expedia and Priceline now own 94 percent of the online travel agency (OTA) market in the United States, according to Phocuswright data. Additionally, Google and TripAdvisor, two of the top online sources of travel inspiration, have released OTA-like features that will surely disrupt the market further. What does this mean for hotels? Hotels rely on OTAs to acquire new customers. The latest OTA consolidation means there is less competition. This, on top of the release of Book on Google and TripAdvisor Instant Booking, may result in fewer direct bookings and higher commission fees for hotels. Read on...

Jeff Catlin

You are already reading your reviews. I mean, you are, right? If not, then, you probably should at least start doing that. Do that, and then come back to this article. What we're going to talk about here is how you can broaden your view from just your reviews, out to competition reviews, then out to listening to all the social conversations that are relevant to your guest experience.Your brand reputation translates directly into higher revenue, and nowhere is brand reputation influenced more than online. The Internet is an enormously influential tool for consumers today: 80% of TripAdvisor's 340 million unique monthly users read at least 6-12 reviews before they book a hotel; another survey reported almost 30 percent of consumers saying that positive online reviews are the single most important factor in their booking decision. Read on...

Bernard Perrine

Since the Internet gained popularity in the mid-1990s, it has largely damaged hoteliers' finances, with travel aggregators forcing down rates and taking a slice of the pie besides. But now a new phenomenon from cyberspace, social media, is offering ways to generate/replenish lost sales and grow. Aside from sparking operational improvements, social can help foster customer loyalty. A look at opportunities and challenges of this "second wave." Read on...

Brandon Dennis

Daily deal websites like Groupon burst into popularity towards the end of the 00s. Since then, they have generated much controversy. Despite being valued at over $6 billion in 2010, Groupon's value has degraded significantly. It's stock value has crashed 43%, heralding many to proclaim the death of flash deals. Not so fast. Groupon's stock woes are due to Groupon's aggressive marketing, and it's stock allocation decisions. Despite it's troubles, Groupon still sits on $868 billion in cash reserves. In 2011, a BIA/Kelsey report predicted that consumers would spend $4.2 billion on daily deals by 2015; by 2016, they predict the number will rise to $5.5 billion. Read on...

Dave Ratner

A hotel executive's job is an inherently social one; it requires respect, diplomacy, discretion, an optimistic attitude and a commitment to excellence. Hoteliers understand this fact, and they work with the resources they have - they become resourceful themselves - to ensure that every guest enjoys the amenities and exceptional service that each patron should receive. There is a divide, however, a literal separation between what many hotel executives manage in the real world versus what they do (or fail to do) in the digital realm of social media. It is an urgent necessity for hotel executives to enter this virtual world - to join the conversation, with personality and vigor - so the properties these respective professionals represent have a voice, distinctive in its substance and unmistakable in its style, that resonates for guests throughout the globe. Read on...

Bernard Perrine

Monitoring and responding to travelers' comments on social media is now a must for hotels. Guests tell the world, in cyberspace, about the good and bad on their stays at properties. By promptly addressing complaints, along with providing relevant content in travel-related social networking communities, savvy brands can increase occupancy and revenue - and even build loyalty. We look at tools and tactics for effective "social listening." Read on...

Carolyn Murphy

Every time Facebook makes a change, there's a similar outcry: It's creepy that Facebook keeps tracking more and more of our actions. Despite this sentiment, Facebook usage keeps growing and growing. Understanding this paradox and how to navigate it is crucial for hotels that want to deliver relevant communications in a way that honors guests' privacy. Read on...

Brandon Dennis

It's frustrating not being able to control what people say about your property. In the past, damage was minimal. One disgruntled guest could impact only a handful of people. Today, one disgruntled guest can ruin your business. All it takes is one viral video showing bedbugs at your property, and your business is forever harmed. It's important to go online and check up on your reputation, to see what people are saying. It may be tricky to know where to begin. Here is my list of the most important places where you need to make sure your reputation is positive. Read on...

Michelle Wohl

If you are evaluating how a mobile app or mobile website can add value to your hotel, there is more to consider than just how it looks or the features that it contains. For a mobile solution to truly be successful, it must be easily integrated into your existing systems, readily adopted by your guests, supported by your staff and built for future innovation. This guide will outline the considerations you should explore as part of your decision-making process. Read on...

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Coming up in July 2018...

Hotel Spa: Oasis Unplugged

The driving force in current hotel spa trends is the effort to manage unprecedented levels of stress experienced by their clients. Feeling increasingly overwhelmed by demanding careers and technology overload, people are craving places where they can go to momentarily escape the rigors of their daily lives. As a result, spas are positioning themselves as oases of unplugged human connection, where mindfulness and contemplation activities are becoming increasingly important. One leading hotel spa offers their clients the option to experience their treatments in total silence - no music, no talking, and no advice from the therapist - just pure unadulterated silence. Another leading hotel spa is working with a reputable medical clinic to develop a “digital detox” initiative, in which clients will be encouraged to unplug from their devices and engage in mindfulness activities to alleviate the stresses of excessive technology use. Similarly, other spas are counseling clients to resist allowing technology to monopolize their lives, and to engage in meditation and gratitude exercises in its place. The goal is to provide clients with a warm, inviting and tranquil sanctuary from the outside world, in addition to also providing genuine solutions for better sleep, proper nutrition, stress management and natural self-care. To accomplish this, some spas are incorporating a variety of new approaches - cryotherapy, Himalayan salt therapy and ayurveda treatments are becoming increasingly popular. Other spas are growing their own herbs and performing their treatments in lush outdoor gardens. Some spa therapists are being trained to assess a client's individual movement patterns to determine the most beneficial treatment specifically for them. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will report on these trends and developments and examine how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.