Library Archives

 
Kelly McGuire

Revenue management and marketing really are two sides of the same coin. Each department holds key pieces of information about demand that, when integrated, result in critical insight about demand patterns, product preferences and purchase behavior. Unfortunately, employees in these two closely related functions do not always work well together. Misaligned goals and poor communication result in situations where marketers, with a goal of generating demand, sends out discount promotions that dilute rates during peak periods. While revenue managers, trying to maximize revenue, close off promotional rates meant to encourage stays from the most loyal guests. These conflicting activities damage revenue performance and guest relationships. Read on...

Kristie Dickinson

Lodging experts have written numerous articles on revenue management aimed at addressing specific tactical issues on pricing, distribution and measuring results for those "inside" the operation. By contrast, this article is intended for the "outsider" - namely individuals closely vested in hotel performance, but not directly involved in daily operations…hotel Owners. While the art and science of revenue management should be left in the hands of the property management and asset management teams, here are some key considerations which may be helpful to hotel owners in evaluating the role and effectiveness of revenue management and understanding the influence it can have on hotel performance and overall asset value. Read on...

Paul van Meerendonk

Progressive hoteliers spend significant time analyzing their properties and identify areas where revenue potential can be expanded through packaging a range of services. While areas such as food and beverage, spa facilities, conference facilities and even additional leisure options such as golf courses, make up a hotelier's overall 'Asset', often overlooked is the role hotel technology can play in helping to package and promote offerings that expand beyond room rates. Read on...

Brandon Edwards

There are two ways to increase profits - raising revenue or lowering costs. Hospitality employers often miss opportunities to lower costs by missing valuable tax savings attributable to hiring incentives. The federal government provides businesses with tax credits for hiring members of disadvantaged groups. This often represents a larger share of a hotel's staff than one would imagine. A member of a targeted group can be as simple as someone who lives in a designated area to one of the 40 million plus recipients of food stamps. Overall, a hospitality employer can expect between 15% and 25% of new hires to qualify for tax credits. Here is a rundown of the major programs to look at for 2011... Read on...

Glenn Pedersen

How are you monitoring your direct sales force efforts? Who do you count as a member of the sales team? How often are you validating their effectiveness and what are the measurement criteria you are using? Who is interacting with the sales team on a daily, weekly and/or monthly basis? How often does the sales team speak with the revenue management team? Who is on the REVENUE MANAGEMENT TEAM? The answers to each one of these questions can be the difference between success and failure, between REVPAR growth or lost business. Read on...

Paul van Meerendonk

Accurate pricing has been shown to be the fastest and most effective way to increase profit across the hospitality sector, but even with a rising amount of information about pricing and increasingly sophisticated technology, few hotels appear executing it well. While setting a price for a room or service may seems like a simple decision, it is also inherently complex and not without its risks. However, if you get these decisions right, a successful pricing strategy can be one of the most significant, positive profit-impacting decisions your hotel can make. Read on...

Mike Kistner

Recovery continues in both the corporate and leisure travel markets. While the leisure sector sustains a slow but steady pace, corporate travel has eclipsed the recovery with both strong booking volumes and record-high growth in average daily rates (ADR). However, despite the significant increases in reservations of greater than +24% over 2009 each month since April, according to data reported in The Pegasus View, hotel revenue is still being hampered by weak ADRs, particularly in the leisure sector. What's a hotel to do? Examine and understand the state of their rates, then seize control of their pricing strategy by understanding their market position, their guests and their resources. Read on...

Paul van Meerendonk

There's no doubt that the speed with which the hotel industry is evolving is accelerating, and more often than not, hoteliers are being forced to constantly evaluate and re-evaluate throughout the year to ensure that revenue is being maximised. Given the growing influence of channel management in recent years, hoteliers across the globe are having to plan very carefully for the future and ensure that the right strategies are in place to work with organisations like Online Travel Agencies (OTAs) - who wield more power than ever before. Read on...

Glenn Pedersen

Whether the economy is in good shape or bad shape, Revenue Management is a tool, if used successfully, will drive increased sales and bottom line profits. Revenue Management is something everyone knows about but not everyone uses. While there is normally a cost to implementing this at your hotel, there is also an intuitive cost if you don't use it. Our desk clerks are not trained reservation agents and in most Property Management Systems these same desk clerks have the ability to make reservations at the front desk. Unfortunately, they also have the ability to by-pass revenue management strategies in that same system with very little difficulty. Why do we allow this to occur when the remedy is so easy... easy for the customer, easy for the desk clerk and easy for the top line as well as the bottom line. Read on...

Brandon Edwards

Many hospitality employers may not be aware of the numerous state and federal  hiring-based tax incentive programs available to them and the benefits these can have on their bottom line. With the most current tax incentive programs in place, hospitality employers can receive an average of over $600 per new employee hired.  Over a three year period, including retroactive credits, this can easily add up to hundreds of thousands of dollars per location. Here are some best practices on implementing such programs, specifically the Work Opportunity Tax Credit, the Hire Now Tax Cut and the Enterprise Zone and Empowerment Zones programs. Read on...

Brandon Edwards

Most business executives don't feel they are getting much out of the federal stimulus initiatives. But hospitality employers are well-positioned to capitalize on one such initiative: the HIRE Act hiring-based tax incentive program. Hotel operators can claim tax benefits of roughly $750 per qualified hire, and at least half of new hires will qualify. The HIRE Act is not only good for the economy because it encourages companies to bring people back into the workforce, but it's also great for the bottom line. Here are some guidelines on how the HIRE Act works and how to implement a screening program. Read on...

Paul van Meerendonk

In these economic times, hoteliers across the globe need to be more aggressive in pursuing demand in order to deliver profitability. Ensuring coordination between key hotel operational departments is paramount in targeting the right guests and helping to establish customer loyalty amongst profitable guests. In this environment, hotel owners and managers alike need to be mindful that their marketing and revenue management departments are working together and it is important that open channels of communication are maintained. Both the marketing and revenue management departments are unfortunately siloed in many companies, but each holds an important key to the business, which, when used together, become a powerful tool for generating hotel revenue. Read on...

Kristi White

Occupancies have stabilized and are recovering around the world. It's time for ADRs to make the same recovery. No more hibernating with the bears. For those regions still in hibernation, the time to act is now. At best, consumers will accept a 5% increase in rate annually. While that might not seem much, it's better than a 5% move in the opposite direction. For hoteliers, every day in the foreseeable future should be a run with the bulls—with the same sense of urgency and confidence. Viva San Fermin! Read on...

Paul van Meerendonk

For many hotels, developing effective pricing strategies remains a complex issue for revenue managers. Their goal, ultimately, is to maximize companywide revenue and profits while building strong hotel partner relationships within their marketplace. Beyond the scope of regular revenue management practices such as selecting the correct overbooking, rate restrictions and best available rate, lies the challenge of selecting the correct rates to choose from in the first place. The emergence of rate optimization has made strides to demystify pricing practices and help revenue managers understand the demand characteristics of their products, understand the price sensitivity of demand and design a rate spectrum that is tuned to all these. This allows hoteliers to take full advantage of their business opportunities, ensuring that they are capturing the maximum revenue at all times through an optimized rate spectrum. Read on...

Tina Stehle

Hoteliers that want to prosper in today's economic environment are increasingly turning to business intelligence applications that enable them to assess risks and make more informed decisions. Business intelligence solutions help you to gather, analyze and leverage a wide variety of data in order to gain a competitive edge and increase your visibility in a crowded market. In my article, I outline the top 10 benefits of incorporating a business intelligence solution into your daily operations. Read on...

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Coming up in September 2019...

Hotel Group Meetings: Uncommon Destinations

The last few years have been good to the Hotel Group Meetings industry and that trend is expected to continue into 2019. Planners are brimming with confidence due to an expanding economy and increased job creation, which typically results in a boost in corporate meetings. Given this promising outlook, planners are trying to outdo themselves to satisfy the high expectations of their clients. One notable trend is to integrate unusual settings into the meeting experience, hosting groups at local zoos, aquariums, museums, event centers, or other outdoor facilities. The goal is to embrace uncommon destinations, rather than a typical hotel conference room, so that meetings can be memorable, unique and stimulating. This is also part of another trend which is to support all things local - from hosting events at landmark city venues; to catering through local restaurants, food trucks and microbreweries; to hosting off-site excursions like agri-tours, athletic events or scenic 5k routes. However, though the setting might be spectacular, there are still some bedrock components that must be provided to ensure a successful meeting. Free, high-speed Wi-Fi is still one of the most requested services. Planners have to make sure that a comprehensive communication infrastructure is in place so clients can easily connect - and stay connected - to the network throughout the entire meeting experience. Also, technology tools can be used to streamline the booking, registration, and check-in process, and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) materials can be utilized to ensure seamless access to conference events. There are also numerous software tools that encourage audience participation, as well as integrating polls, Q&A, surveys and games into speakers' presentations. The September Hotel Business Review will examine issues relevant to group meetings and will report on what some hotels are doing to promote this sector of their operations.