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Vince Brunetti

Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort and Spa announces the use of locally-sourced, sustainable products along with healthier menu options. The transition, which began in 2011 as part of a complete overhaul of its dining outlets is now reflected across the property, as part of a new corporate food and beverage philosophy, 'Food. Thoughtfully Sourced. Carefully Served'. Highlights include: at least five local ingredients on every menu; cage-free eggs on all menus; vegan, gluten-free and vegetarian choices on all menus; and smaller portions. Vincent Brunetti, executive assistant manager and food and beverage director shares his thoughts about this transition. Read on...

Michael Haynie, SR.

Profitable food and beverage in a hotel environment is possible, but it needs to be taken seriously as a priority. Owners no longer tolerate amenities in hotels with one hundred plus percent cost. Understanding your market and what you want to be, as well as hiring the right food and beverage skills to suit your operations will give your restaurant a chance to succeed. Read on...

Brian Mitchell

Does F&B have sufficient sales focus? Can the F&B model as it exists in full-service hotels learn from other sales cultures? We maintain that it not only can, but must, if profit returns are to be lifted. We demonstrate how an incremental beverage sales strategy based on impulse sales, trade-up sales, add-on sales, and solution selling methods, can be successfully applied within F&B operations - in a way that not only protects the establishment's service reputation, but significantly enhances it through greater enjoyment for diners. A crucial element is the use of diner psychology techniques within the expertise capability of all floor staff. Read on...

Colby Brock

A hotel acts as catalyst in bringing people from all walks of life, demographically, geographically, and otherwise, together to share in a singular experience. Yet, a hotel's highest goal is to give guests a feeling of home. This gives rise to an interesting proposition; home means something different for each of us. Therefore, each person will have a completely subjective experience. Now, we can take that one step further. When it comes to operating a successful food and beverage department within a hotel, your goal is not only to accommodate hotel guests, but the local community as well, unless you are resigned to only catering to your room guests. Pleasing the bedroom community presents an even more compelling conundrum. Read on...

Ian McPhee

Over the years, Hoteliers have provided value to the luxury traveler via various amenities -- from thirsty bath robes and opulent spa escapes -- to bespoke mini-bars, personal butlers and the latest in technology at one's fingertips. These however, have become industry standards at high end properties across the globe and for the guest whom the dollar amount is not a question, The Ritz-Carlton, Kapalua augments world-renowned service with island-savvy and innovative approaches, offering both tangible and intangible added-value for our guests. Read on...

Rohit Verma

A web-based study of nearly 500 respondents conducted by two researchers at Cornell University compared three possibilities for presenting the service charge for a prix fixe meal, namely, as a percentage added to the meal price, as a dollar amount added to the meal price, and as an unknown amount obscured by inclusion in the full meal price. The researchers concluded that the respondents inferred a 15-percent service charge, when one was not specified. Thus, a stated percentage service charge over that amount was viewed as "expensive." Survey participants regarded the dollar-amount service charges similarly, but this format also may serve to obscure the service charge calculation. Read on...

Tina Stehle

When hotel executives think of smartphone and other mobile technology, guest self-service applications are most likely to come to mind. After all, consumers increasingly use mobile applications to check in and check out, order room service, schedule wake-up calls, make restaurant reservations,request luggage pick-up and confirm car rentals. It offers the ultimate in convenience, ease-of-use and efficiency. Yet, this same technology can also be employed by hotel staff to boost productivity and streamline operations. Read on...

Janine Roberts

Looking for ways to add revenue and new profits to your hotel's bottom line while increasing guest satisfaction? Adding a hotel pantry to your lobby is a quick and affordable project if you know what you need and where to look! There are just a few must-have items that are easy to find and easy on the budget - allowing even the smallest hotels to put a profitable pantry in place quickly and painlessly. Read on...

Janine Roberts

The basic rule to achieving maximum retail success is "offer the right products at the right price." But what are the right products for the hotel pantry? With everything that is available and all of the snack and beverage trends that come and go, how does a manager go about selecting a winning assortment that meets the two most important hotel retail goals: maximum revenue and total guest satisfaction? Read on...

Susie Ross

Some might sum up the "art of listening" in two simple words: SHUT UP! While I think that is definitely a major part of listening, I think it is only part of the art when serving guests in a restaurant. Servers must listen not only to what guests are saying, they must also listen to what guests are not saying. Servers have to know what questions to ask in order to find out how to best serve their guests. Read on...

Susie Ross

In the restaurant business we like to say we know how important the Hosts and Bus People are, yet we seem to push them aside when it comes to training and menu knowledge. They aren't the ones who have the most contact with your guests; therefore, they don't need to be trained as extensively as your wait staff. If we think about that, we might realize that they do spend quite a bit of time with our guests - all of them. They are always visible; they're the people guests beckon to get their server to their table and they don't usually know much about the menu! Read on...

Juan Carlos Flores

The influx of new and interesting wines to accompany gastronomical innovations has produced a hunger for learning and experimenting with pairings of wine and food. Dessert wines provide an open window to delightfully sweet and powerful experiences. They are also so varied that you can present them in any number of ways. Dessert wines are produced in limited quantities throughout the world and tend to be more expensive than the average bottle of everyday drinking wine. Yet, a single glass of these wines, at any moment of the day, is capable of giving great satisfaction. Read on...

Juan Carlos Flores

It is not always necessary to have an extremely large selection of wines to have a successful business and happy clients. Do you recall how many wines were on the last wine list you read? Did you read them all? As a wine client, was it really important to you to sort through an enormously lengthy wine list before selecting the one you would order? For most people, it is not. In the last five years I have lost many dinner partners because of my passion for reading and asking about everything on the menus and wine lists. Sometimes menus-and especially the wine selections-are so extensive that they can be painful for our dinner companions. Certainly, those of us in the food & beverage business are fascinated with seeing creative new ideas and new information, but it can be exhausting for the layman who just wants to enjoy a good meal, complemented by a nice bottle of wine, without spending thirty minutes on the selection. Read on...

Juan Carlos Flores

You can't sell wine when the atmosphere in your restaurant puts all its emphasis on cocktails. Often we find owners, managers and professionals in the art of the table who think that wine is just one more option on the restaurant menu and that it is as simple to sell as a coke or an iced tea. We all know that selling wine in a restaurant is an important income producer if it is done in the correct way. We must also understand that wine is not just another liquid product: It is a moment. It is culture, history, sensuality and opulence that people share while they are drinking wine. We need to respect this moment, and we do so by paying attention to the details that honor it: with correct glassware, correct temperature, correct quantity and with skill and professional attention from the people who are serving it. You can't sell wine if you and the ambiance of your location do not offer your clients the small but significant details that they normally don't have at home. Read on...

Juan Carlos Flores

We know that knowledge of special cuisine and wines is not easily acquired, but comes from the investment of time, study and money. How often we see the people we have spent months training in our restaurants or wine boutiques leave for other jobs, taking with them all they have learned from us. Here we will discuss not only motivation and incentives, but also the importance of making the small changes in our business that will encourage staff stay with us. Read on...

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Coming up in November 2019...

Architecture & Design: Biophilic Design

The hospitality industry is constantly evolving to meet and exceed guest expectations. As a result, hotels are always on the lookout for new ways to improve the guest experience, and architecture and design is an essential part of this equation. Bold design is often the most effective way to make an exceptional first impression - an impression guests use to distinguish between brands. One design trend that is being embraced worldwide has become known as “Biophilic Design.” Biophilic design is based on the concept of biophilia, which is the theory that human beings have an innate tendency to seek out nature, natural elements, and natural forms. Biophilic design is more than hotels simply adding a surplus of plants; it involves incorporating specific design elements into a hotel in order to imbue it with a sense of wellness and well-being. Some of those elements include exposure to natural lighting; views of nature and rooms with a view; natural architectural patterns; salvaged or reclaimed woods of all types; reclaimed metals; sustainably sourced stone; living green walls and vertical gardens; and direct and indirect exposure to nature. Hotels that have incorporated biophilic design into their properties are reaping the benefits associated with this trend including reduced stress responses, better air quality, lower energy costs, and more positive guest reviews. Biophilic design has also been shown to improve guest moods and to satisfy consumer demand for environmental responsibility. Savvy hotel owners and managers are aware that nature-inspired elements enhance their guests' comfort and well-being, which is why this trend is becoming so prevalent. Biophilic design is just one topic in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.