Library Archives

 
Mike Handelsman

Hotel owners can face tremendous pressure when selling their business, which may prompt them to market the business through all possible channels. Sellers must remember, though, that confidentiality is crucial to ensuring that vendors, partners and customers stay on board as potential buyers become interested. Revealing that your business is for sale can have major repercussions that could impact your bottom line and the ability to secure an interested buyer. There are a few ways to keep your sale confidential, however, while still exposing the right information to potential buyers and maximizing the sale price. Read on...

Elaine Oksner

Today's hospitality world presents a constant ebb and flow of sales and marketing challenges, especially with recent changes in the economy. With that in mind, there may be people on your hospitality team who present an undiscovered sales and marketing resource. Savvy hoteliers can make a strategic move in their overall sales strategy by harnessing the power of the concierge position. Before I tell you how and identify six ways to maximize this often underused resource, let me explain why this strategy will work. Read on...

Fred B. Roedel, III

When developing a hotel, operations must be given priority standing. Operations are essential in order to get a hotel up, running, and producing revenue within a set timeline. Developers must spend the time required to integrate all aspects related to operating the hotel into the overall development plan at its inception. Failure to do so will inevitably result in costly delays. If you do not have an operations expert on staff, hire a consultant. Experienced operators are invaluable when it comes to establishing and meeting performance standards for the design, time, cost and quality of a hotel development. Read on...

Steven Belmonte

One would think that after 30-plus years in this industry, I've seen it all. But truth be told, I'm still witnessing some amazing new roles and functions that are taking place in the hospitality industry. The industry had an incredible few decades with prosperity, growth, new programs, and a new direction in terms of franchising. And now that we are at the beginning of a recession, we are seeing franchisors developing creative and ingenious marketing programs and incentives to compete with emerging brands that have captured the attention of franchisees. Read on...

Nelson Migdal

The deed in lieu of foreclosure offers lenders and borrowers an alternative to foreclosure when the going gets rough. However, when the subject of foreclosure is an operating hotel, there are many complexities that must be analyzed and understood prior to handing the keys over to the lender. Read on...

Jeff Guaracino

The gay and lesbian travel market is too often considered simply a leisure market segment. Nothing could be further from the truth. Gay and lesbian travel is also group, meeting and convention and corporate. Would you be surprised to learn that 27 gay-oriented meetings have met in Dallas, Texas, in hotels since that city launched its gay tourism marketing efforts in 2004? Veronica Torres, diversity convention sales manager of the Dallas Convention & Visitors Bureau, is the perhaps the most successful CVB sales woman in the country. Each year, she is responsible for booking more than 8,000 hotel room nights attributable to the GLBT market. She has proven that a straight woman can reign as queen in gay meetings. Read on...

John Ely

It is nearly impossible to escape the talk about today's economy. Everywhere you turn, people are constantly discussing the recession-like atmosphere of our nation. During the presidential race, polls showed that the economy was the number one issue on people's minds. And as we inched closer to Election Day in November, many media outlets focused heavily on the crisis. From the initial meltdown of the housing industry, the nation's credit crunch, and the increasing stock market woes, we were (and are) continually bombarded with negative messages about our future. Read on...

Frank Meek

A pest sighting in your hotel is never a good thing. One guest could tell another guest, who tells another, and the next thing you know, the incident hits the Internet waves for all to read - ultimately damaging your hotel's reputation and business. But the good news is you can stop this nightmare before it starts. Simple exterior maintenance practices are one the easiest ways to prevent pests' entry into your establishment, and the best part is they are cost-effective too. Read on for several exterior maintenance practices that you can put in place immediately to keep pests outside where they belong. Read on...

Leigh Anne Dolecki

Wow, has it really been less than 15 years since were introduced to the World Wide Web? It's not news that modern technology has completely changed the way we live in the past ten to twenty years. At this point in my career, I can't even imagine being a concierge without it. By nature, concierges are information junkies; many of us find this new frontier absolutely irresistible as it appeals to our sense of curiosity and problem solving. Many of us have spent late nights clicking and learning, clicking and learning...clicking and, of course, learning. Read on...

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Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.