Library Archives

 
Sherry Heyl

There are many advantages to not only hiring freelancers but to develop long-term relationships with a team of freelancers. Many people have made freelancing a career choice and therefore have committed to ongoing training and developing their expertise in a specific niche. By working with freelancers, you're not only able to augment your staff but you will benefit from specialize knowledge and the diverse experience of the freelancer. Also, having a relationship with a team of freelancers enables your team to deliver projects on time, save money, and not over burden existing team members. Today, not only are freelancers benefiting from the freedom and flexibility that their choices offer, but so are the hotels they work with. Read on...

Ray Chung

Lighting has always been an integral part of hospitality design and has never been more important—or more challenging—than it is today. Advances in technology allow for much more flexibility, just as hotels try to accommodate the changing demands of their guests. But with careful planning, these challenges can instead become opportunities to create unique and memorable guest experiences. While all parts of your hotel should feel cohesive, not all areas should have the same exact lighting. The lobby, restaurant, meeting and banquet rooms, corridors, hotel rooms and exterior spaces all have different purposes and different lighting needs. Read on...

Nicholas Tsabourakis

Market segmentation is of particular importance in the complex and competitive hospitality world of today because it does not only help put things in perspective, but also ensures that you won't have to waste money and efforts in areas that won't bring any positive results. Cost of acquisition and contribution by revenue source are extremely important factors that need to be taken into consideration when managing a business in the highly competitive and ambiguous hotel management industry, which is another reason why market segmentation needs to be leveraged. Doing so will not only help you understand where your customers are coming from, but it will also be easier for you to figure out which areas need improvement and which customer groups you should focus on more for greater revenues. Read on...

Adria Levtchenko

Today's hospitality organizations rely on advanced technologies in a wide range of back-office operations, as well as areas directly impacting guest services. And much more is to come. Implementing these technologies successfully demands a careful approach to assessing needs, whereby all stakeholders embrace the new systems; acquisition; and implementation, including a thoughtful approach to staff training. In this way, we can achieve the objectives of making our jobs easier as we acquire new powers, communicate better within our organizations and with strategic partners and serve guests in new ways. Read on...

Bhanu Chopra

It is challenging task to manage rate parity. A lot of effort is required to track cracks in rate parity, especially for enterprise hotel. Current market subtleties require that hoteliers move much beyond detecting breaches and focus on implementing manners to not only report breaches, but take measures to put a stop to rate disparities and also avert them in the future. In this article learn how to avoid revenue damages caused by breach of rate parity. Know what kind of rate parity tools are modern and learned hotel revenue managers investing in to stay up in the game. Learn about a well-executed rate parity strategy, to make your hotel superbly prepared to achieve its goals in 2018. Read on...

Hillary Bressler

Millennials make great travelers. They see vacation as a way of life. But are they worth the focus? Millennials travel often which is music to the ears of the travel industry. They travel the most, but spend the least. All surveys point to the increasing importance of Millennials to the family travel market as well. They believe travel agents are totally worth it, and they like to cruise. Tap into these interesting facts about how the Millennials are traveling that will have the travel industry singing a happy tune. Read on...

William Shepherd

Marriott recently announced the implementation of global anti-human trafficking policies and a training program for all employees. The company's efforts highlight the growing national and international trend toward requiring companies to proactively weed out trafficking from their business and supply chains. Both domestic and international laws are making fighting trafficking a business imperative for hotels who want to avoid brand and liability risks. Read on...

John Tess

Brands increasingly seek ways to distinguish themselves in the marketplace by creating a "local" experience. The rehabilitation of vintage buildings offers real opportunities. The historic spaces give a window to the local past. The stories associated with the buildings create a unique guest experience and real sense of the community they are visiting. This article focuses on five case studies from around the country: The Langham in Chicago, the Crawford at Denver's Union Station, the Monaco in Washington, D.C, the Argonaut in San Francisco, and the Adelphi in Saratoga Springs. Read on...

Simon Hudson

As the ski season comes to an end, my article looks at the unique challenges of running a hotel in the mountains, and at the winter-specific services provided at ski resort hotels - from the humble Lake Louise Inn in Banff National Park with its affordable family units, packed pizza restaurant, and popular pub nights for ski workers, to the spectacular Waldorf Astoria Park City, the only Waldorf on snow, that gives guests access to high-end, brand new ski and snowboard equipment, and use of its own dedicated Frostwood Gondola a few steps away from the hotel entrance. Read on...

Mark Ricketts

It's been reported that millennials decide within their first 48 hours with an organization whether they will stay on for an extended period of time. Talk about first impressions being the most lasting! Most importantly, the accession and training process for new hires must reflect what works best for our operating model and how we believe people should be treated within any organization. This article will discuss some best practices in making any new hire feel welcome to a hospitality organization while "coming up to speed." It will also consider strategies and techniques that will help keep unproductive misconceptions or misunderstandings from arising between employer and employee. Read on...

Bonnie Knutson

This article points out what marketers instinctively have known for a long time now: People buy with their heart and justify with their head. Noted neurologist Donald Caine said it best: The essential difference between emotion and reason is that emotion leads to action while reason leads to conclusions." In other words, it is increasingly being acknowledged that people respond more to emotional marketing than to rational information when deciding what to buy or where to buy it. Think about memorable Super bowl commercials that moved people throughout the years. Coca Cola's Mean Joe Green. Budweiser's Clydesdale Horses. Or the 2018 Dorito's Blaze commercial with Morgan Freeman. Read on to learn more... Read on...

Zoe Connolly

The interview process works both ways, as hiring managers and candidates alike decide if the job is the right fit. Often times, however, managers leave an interview wishing they'd asked a different question or explored a topic further. Rather than being left with more questions than answers, here are 8 ways that hotel leaders can get more out of the inteview, better understand an applicant's potential, and eliminate the chances of alienating a quality candidate. Read on...

Mia A. Mackman

The original value and objectives associated with spa facilities and wellness programming have surpassed preconceived departmental importance. This article reveals how spa and wellness aspects are disseminated throughout the whole guest experience, and how wellness motivated design and construction elements complement property development, enhance marketability and engagement and is spurring new growth across the hospitality sector. This article also examines how critical management adjustments, and product and service enhancements can significantly add value, increase RevPAR and improve average daily rate performance. Read on...

David Ashen

There's a fine line between nodding to culture and addressing universal needs. When it comes to smart hotel design, David Ashen, founder and partner of interior design and brand consulting firm dash design, believes that owners and operators, and the designers and architects who partner with them, need to be mindful of the small details that can make or break a guests' travel experience. By looking at world trends, local architecture and cultural norms, properties can be developed as more relevant on both macro and micro levels; that is for global brands and the hotel's guests. Read on...

Kurt Meister

Hotels are becoming increasingly tech friendly, offering a range of value-added services such as smartphone check-ins, text message reservation confirmations, smartphone key cards and public wifi - just to name a few conveniences aimed at guest satisfaction. Simultaneously, hotels are also increasingly vulnerable to data theft. From POS terminals to guest apps, hotels collect and retain a great deal of guest data that is attractive to hackers. By understanding the risks and creating an appropriate response plan, hotel operators will position themselves to address those risks as well as cope with the fallout of a data breach should it happen. Read on...

Show Per Page
1 2 3 4 5 ... 191
Coming up in July 2018...

Hotel Spa: Oasis Unplugged

The driving force in current hotel spa trends is the effort to manage unprecedented levels of stress experienced by their clients. Feeling increasingly overwhelmed by demanding careers and technology overload, people are craving places where they can go to momentarily escape the rigors of their daily lives. As a result, spas are positioning themselves as oases of unplugged human connection, where mindfulness and contemplation activities are becoming increasingly important. One leading hotel spa offers their clients the option to experience their treatments in total silence - no music, no talking, and no advice from the therapist - just pure unadulterated silence. Another leading hotel spa is working with a reputable medical clinic to develop a “digital detox” initiative, in which clients will be encouraged to unplug from their devices and engage in mindfulness activities to alleviate the stresses of excessive technology use. Similarly, other spas are counseling clients to resist allowing technology to monopolize their lives, and to engage in meditation and gratitude exercises in its place. The goal is to provide clients with a warm, inviting and tranquil sanctuary from the outside world, in addition to also providing genuine solutions for better sleep, proper nutrition, stress management and natural self-care. To accomplish this, some spas are incorporating a variety of new approaches - cryotherapy, Himalayan salt therapy and ayurveda treatments are becoming increasingly popular. Other spas are growing their own herbs and performing their treatments in lush outdoor gardens. Some spa therapists are being trained to assess a client's individual movement patterns to determine the most beneficial treatment specifically for them. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will report on these trends and developments and examine how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.