Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Wald

Gregory A. Wald

Principal, Squire Patton Boggs (US) LLP

Gregory A. Wald is Principal at Squire Patton Boggs (US) LLP. Mr. Wald's experience includes representing multinational and Fortune 500 companies and individual clients in all aspects of immigration law including non-immigrant visas, and immigrant matters regarding multinational executives and managers, individuals of extraordinary ability and professionals. He has appeared before the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS), US Department of Labor, US Department of Justice Executive Office for Immigration Review and various federal courts. From 1997 to 2000 Mr. Wald was an assistant district counsel for the US Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) in the Miami and San Francisco districts. In this role, he advised the INS on multiple aspects of immigration, naturalization, criminal and civil law. As a member of the Employer Sanctions Team, he provided analysis and consultation to special agents on the legal sufficiency of Notices of Intent to Fine regarding Form I-9 audits, compliance and worksite enforcement operations. Mr. Wald is a frequent speaker on business immigration and compliance matters. In 2011 Gregory presented on a panel discussing immigration compliance auditing at the Stanford Rock Center for Corporate Governance Worksite Immigration Compliance Symposium. He has presented in seminars and conferences of the American Immigration Lawyers Association - most recently on Immigration Options for Entrepreneurs and Investors, ILW.COM's Technology Immigration: Update From The Trenches, as well as client seminars regarding the latest trends in employment-based immigration and government enforcement actions. Mr. Wald is also the author of the chapter “Aramark v. SEIU and the Evolution of Constructive Knowledge in Relation to the DHS Social Security No-Match Rule” appearing in The Immigration Compliance Book 2009-2010. He is co-editor of Survival Tool Kit for the Worksite Enforcement Jungle (2012 AILA Midyear Conference). Mr. Wald served as chair of the Northern California Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association in 2010/2011 and currently serves on the SSA/DMV/SAVE Taskforce of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. In 2009 he was nominated as one of California's leading practitioners in the field of corporate immigration and listed in Who's Who Legal: California. He is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell, the highest rating for ability and ethics. Mr. Wald is listed as a Northern California Super Lawyer, a distinction honoring the top 5 percent of lawyers in the area. He is also listed in the The Best Lawyers in America.

Mr. Wald can be contacted at 415-393-9828 or gregory.wald@squirepb.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.