Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Finjer

Corey Finjer

Sr. Vice President, Hawkins International PR

Corey Finjer has been with Hawkins International PR (HIPR), a top-tier global PR firm specializing in travel lifestyle, hospitality and spa/wellness brands, for almost a decade. Since joining HIPR, she has overseen the launch of several major projects from the multi-million dollar redesign of Jumby Bay, A Rosewood Resort to the rebranding and opening of the former Versace mansion in Miami as The Villa By Barton G. Ms. Finjer also oversees ongoing traditional and new media relations campaigns for luxury hotel brands, such as Dorchester Collection, independent boutique properties, such as XV Beacon in Boston, start-ups such as Flytographer and TINT, and airlines such as La Compagnie, among others. Ms. Finjer also runs the agency's digital division, amplifying traditional results-oriented media efforts by masterfully guiding existing and new clients across the complex digital space. The digital team has seen 200% growth over the past year, developing their clients' strategic social initiatives and content, launching targeted influencer marketing programs, and elevating their community management action plans. Ultimately, she is responsible for changing the way luxury travel brands and individual properties reach and connect with their audiences - globally - across social media platforms. Prior to joining HIPR, Ms. Finjer found her passion for the hospitality industry working in-house managing marketing and public relations for The Charles Hotel, a luxury property in Cambridge, MA. She received a bachelor of science in communications, summa cum laude, with a concentration in public relations, and a bachelor of arts in psychology, magna cum laude, from Boston University.

Ms. Finjer can be contacted at 212-255-6541 or corey@hawkpr.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.