Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Marr

David C. Marr

Senior Vice President & Global Head, Hilton Full Service Brands

David C. Marr serves as senior vice president and global head for Hilton's Full Service Brands category, overseeing the company's flagship brand, Hilton Hotels & Resorts, as well as the DoubleTree by Hilton, Curio Collection by Hilton and Tapestry Collection by Hilton brands.  Dave and his team oversee full service brand operations and standards, and provide global product development and brand definition in areas including Food and Beverage, Innovation, Wellness, Spa, and Fitness.  Mr. Marr was appointed to his current role in 2017 and has brought his hospitality experience and knowledge of the industry to Hilton's global portfolio of world-class hotels and resorts. In this role, he is responsible for the strategic direction and growth of Hilton's full service brands.

Mr. Marr has an extensive background in leading development strategy, brand positioning, marketing, communications and owner relations in the hospitality industry. With more than 30 years of experience in the industry, Mr. Marr has a proven track record of success, generating strong growth for major hospitality brands and launching successful, large-scale hotel brands. Mr. Marr began his hospitality career at Hilton and has worked with the company in a variety of positions across key markets including Washington, D.C., Boston, and New Jersey. He also spent time working at the iconic Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York City.

Mr. Marr received his bachelor's degree in business, management, marketing and related support services from University of New Hampshire's Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics. He is currently based at Hilton's global headquarters in McLean, Va.  


Please visit http://www.hilton.com for more information.

Mr. Marr can be contacted at 703-883-6587 or david.marr@hilton.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.