Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Ellicott

Andy Ellicott

Chief Product & Marketing Officer, Crate.io

Andy Ellicott is Chief Product & Marketing Officer at Crate.io, developers of CrateDB, an open source real-time SQL database for IoT and machine data. He believes that the next wave of big data is being generated by “things,” like sensors, wearables, vehicles, networks, and servers -- and yes, hotel rooms -- all of which can generate millions of data points per second. He joined Crate.io to help companies get value out of that data.

CrateDB is purpose-built for IoT. Customers in the space choose it for its ability to collect and store massive amounts of data like sensor readings and analyze it in real time. CrateDB makes this possible for mainstream software developers, which in turn, enables more rapid innovation of new IoT solutions that improve the way we live, learn, and do business.

Prior to Crate.io, Mr. Ellicott spent 20 years developing, defining, launching and marketing enterprise software for pioneering startups and early-stage companies, including Cloudant (acquired by IBM), Vertica (acquired by HP), TwinStrata (acquired by EMC), Oco (acquired by Deloitte), VoltDB, Kalido, Bowstreet (acquired by IBM), Object Design/eXcelon and Easel. He enjoys being in the data management technology business because he believes the biggest breakthroughs in the way technology impacts society often arise from breakthroughs in the ability to put data to work.

He lives on the beautiful seacoast of New Hampshire with his family and Puggle, Toasty. As much as he loves hotel technology, he's an even bigger fan of big, comfortable beds with lots of pillows.

Please visit http://www.crate.io for more information.

Mr. Ellicott can be contacted at 603-205-2804 or andy@crate.io

Coming up in January 2020...

Mobile Technology: Meeting Tech Expectations

What once seemed futuristic is now the norm, owing to the escalating developments in mobile technology, and hotels must continue to innovate in order to meet guest expectations. In a recent study from Mower, 65 percent of guests said they would gladly pay more for a hotel that provides the mobile technology they deem essential. The same study shows that 44 percent of travelers are more likely to book a smart hotel, and nearly 7 in 10 want to use smart devices provided by the hotel. And how do guests wish to use all this technology? A majority expressed a desire for mobile check-in and check-out, and mobile payment options. They also want to be able to stream content from their phone to the TV; to make service requests of the hotel staff; to control in-room lighting, temperature and sound; to order food and beverages; and to request a wake-up call - all from their mobile device. Guests also expressed preferences for robust wi-fi and convenient device charging ports throughout the hotel. They also appreciate the use of hotel branded apps which allow a guest to book a room, access loyalty programs, receive discounts and rewards, and even use the app to choose the room, floor and view they prefer. Some hotel apps also allow a customer to track their charges throughout their stay, rather than waiting to receive a bill at the end. Finally, mobile tech lounges are popping up more frequently in some hotels. These lounges offer guests the opportunity to perform tasks like airline check-ins or access to local info guides, but they also provide a place where guests can comfortably get some work done outside their room. The January Hotel Business Review will report on what some hotels are doing to meet their customers' expectations in the mobile technology space.