Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Ellicott

Andy Ellicott

Chief Product & Marketing Officer, Crate.io

Andy Ellicott is Chief Product & Marketing Officer at Crate.io, developers of CrateDB, an open source real-time SQL database for IoT and machine data. He believes that the next wave of big data is being generated by “things,” like sensors, wearables, vehicles, networks, and servers -- and yes, hotel rooms -- all of which can generate millions of data points per second. He joined Crate.io to help companies get value out of that data.

CrateDB is purpose-built for IoT. Customers in the space choose it for its ability to collect and store massive amounts of data like sensor readings and analyze it in real time. CrateDB makes this possible for mainstream software developers, which in turn, enables more rapid innovation of new IoT solutions that improve the way we live, learn, and do business.

Prior to Crate.io, Mr. Ellicott spent 20 years developing, defining, launching and marketing enterprise software for pioneering startups and early-stage companies, including Cloudant (acquired by IBM), Vertica (acquired by HP), TwinStrata (acquired by EMC), Oco (acquired by Deloitte), VoltDB, Kalido, Bowstreet (acquired by IBM), Object Design/eXcelon and Easel. He enjoys being in the data management technology business because he believes the biggest breakthroughs in the way technology impacts society often arise from breakthroughs in the ability to put data to work.

He lives on the beautiful seacoast of New Hampshire with his family and Puggle, Toasty. As much as he loves hotel technology, he's an even bigger fan of big, comfortable beds with lots of pillows.

Please visit http://www.crate.io for more information.

Mr. Ellicott can be contacted at 603-205-2804 or andy@crate.io

Coming up in January 2019...

Mobile Technology: The Future is Now

Mobile Technology continues to advance at a relentless pace and the hotel industry continues to adapt. Hotel guests have shown a strong preference for mobile self-service - from checking-in/out at a hotel kiosk, to ordering room service, making dinner reservations, booking spa treatments, and managing laundry/dry cleaning services. And they also enjoy the convenience of paying for these services with smart phone mobile payments. In addition, some hotels have adopted a “concierge in your pocket” concept. Through a proprietary hotel app, guests can access useful information such as local entertainment venues, tourist attractions, event calendars, and medical facilities and services. In-room entertainment continues to be a key factor, as guests insist on the capacity to plug in their own mobile devices to customize their entertainment choices. Mobile technology also allows for greater marketing opportunities. For example, many hotels have adopted the use of “push notifications” - sending promotions, discounts and special event messages to guests based on their property location, purchase history, profiles, etc. Near field communication (NFC) technology is also being utilized to support applications such as opening room doors, earning loyalty points, renting a bike, accessing a rental car, and more. Finally, some hotels have adopted more futuristic technology. Robots are in use that have the ability to move between floors to deliver room service requests for all kinds of items - food, beverages, towels, toothbrushes, chargers and snacks. And infrared scanners are being used by housekeeping staff that can detect body heat within a room, alerting staff that the room is occupied and they should come back at a later time. The January Hotel Business Review will report on what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in this exciting mobile technology space.