Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Ellicott

Andy Ellicott

Chief Product & Marketing Officer, Crate.io

Andy Ellicott is Chief Product & Marketing Officer at Crate.io, developers of CrateDB, an open source real-time SQL database for IoT and machine data. He believes that the next wave of big data is being generated by “things,” like sensors, wearables, vehicles, networks, and servers -- and yes, hotel rooms -- all of which can generate millions of data points per second. He joined Crate.io to help companies get value out of that data.

CrateDB is purpose-built for IoT. Customers in the space choose it for its ability to collect and store massive amounts of data like sensor readings and analyze it in real time. CrateDB makes this possible for mainstream software developers, which in turn, enables more rapid innovation of new IoT solutions that improve the way we live, learn, and do business.

Prior to Crate.io, Mr. Ellicott spent 20 years developing, defining, launching and marketing enterprise software for pioneering startups and early-stage companies, including Cloudant (acquired by IBM), Vertica (acquired by HP), TwinStrata (acquired by EMC), Oco (acquired by Deloitte), VoltDB, Kalido, Bowstreet (acquired by IBM), Object Design/eXcelon and Easel. He enjoys being in the data management technology business because he believes the biggest breakthroughs in the way technology impacts society often arise from breakthroughs in the ability to put data to work.

He lives on the beautiful seacoast of New Hampshire with his family and Puggle, Toasty. As much as he loves hotel technology, he's an even bigger fan of big, comfortable beds with lots of pillows.

Please visit http://www.crate.io for more information.

Mr. Ellicott can be contacted at 603-205-2804 or andy@crate.io

Coming up in May 2020...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Creative Innovation

Being eco-friendly is no longer a fad. It is an urgent planetary need and hotels are actively doing their part to reduce their carbon footprint by implementing sustainable, green practices. In addition to the goodwill derived from doing the right thing, hotels are also realizing the benefits to their business. A large percentage of Millennials expect hotels to be eco-friendly and will only patronize those properties that are proudly conforming. Consequently, more hotels are realizing that sustainability is a key element in a successful branding strategy. In addition, going green can lead to a more profitable bottom line, as savings on electricity, water and cleaning materials can add up. Also, there are other advantages that come with being an eco-friendly business, such as government subsidies and tax and loan incentives. As a result, many hotels are finding innovative ways to integrate eco-friendly practices into their business. Geo-thermal energy systems, along with energy-from-waste systems, are being used to heat and cool the property. Passive solar panels, green roofs, natural lighting and natural ventilation strategies also assist in energy conservation. Low-flow water systems and plumbing fixtures make a contribution, as does eco-friendly hardwood flooring, and energy efficient televisions and appliances throughout the property. In addition, some hotels have implemented in-room recycling programs, and only provide all-natural, personal care items. One hotel has actually constructed a bee-keeping operation on their grounds. Not only is this good for the bees but the hotel also produces products from the operation which they sell. This kind of creative innovation also holds enormous appeal to guests. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.