Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Hostettler

Daniel Hostettler

President & Managing Director, Ocean House Management

Daniel A. Hostettler is the President and Managing Director of Ocean House Management (OHM) and its group of four properties: Ocean House (Watch Hill, Rhone Island) and Weekapaug Inn (Westerly, Rhode Island), the Preserve at Boulder Hills (Richmond, Rhode Island), and the Inn at Hastings Park (Lexington, Massachusetts).

Having opened the Watch Hill and Westerly properties in 2010 (both now Forbes Five Star properties) and added the Inn in May 2019 (AAA Four Diamond), Mr. Hostettler is now responsible for the group's day-to-day operations and its long-term strategic vision. The Preserve will open this summer.

Mr. Hostettler has gained his experience and perspective over a 25-year career in the hospitality industry, developing and managing hotels, restaurants, residential components and private clubs in Europe and across the United States. His most recent career titles include President and Managing Director of Lajitas (Lajitas, Texas), Managing Director at La Posada de Santa Fe Resort & Spa (Santa Fe, New Mexico), the Summer Lodge Hotel and Spa (Dorset, England). He held a variety of positions at Meadowood (Napa Valley, California), and was part of the opening team of Peninsula (Beverly Hills, California). In all, he has participated in the opening of five luxury properties.

In addition to his work at Ocean House Management, Mr. Hostettler is also the President of Relais & Chateaux, North America, a position he has held since 2017. One of his many responsibilities is to liaise with all eighty eight properties in the United States, Mexico, Canada and the Caribbean. This gives him a rare perspective during the Covid crisis.

Please visit http://www.oceanhouseri.com for more information.

Mr. Hostettler can be contacted at +1 401-584-7043 or dhostettler@oceanhouseri.com

Coming up in July 2020...

Hotel Spa: Back to Nature

As the Wellness Industry continues to expand, hotel spas are also diversifying, placing a greater emphasis on overall well-being. For some spas, this means providing clients with all-inclusive packages that include fitness classes, healthy dining, and offsite leisure activities, in addition to their core services. For example, spas near ski resorts are offering packages that include lift passes, pre-ski yoga sessions, after-ski dinners and spa treatments. Other spas are offering packages that include massages, saunas, mineral baths, hot springs, and recreational hiking and snowmobile activities. These kinds of spa offerings are also part of a "Back to Nature" movement that encourages guests to get out and experience the healing qualities of nature. One such therapy is the Japanese practice known as "forest bathing" which has become popular with spas that are near wooded areas. This practice relies on the ancient power of a forest for promoting a sense of health and well-being. Other spas are incorporating precious metals and stones into their health and beauty treatments - such as silver, gold, pearls and amber. Silver ion baths relax the body and mind, reduce fatigue, and restore energy balance. Gold keeps skin radiant and can even treat various skin diseases and infections, due to its antibacterial qualities. Amber is used to calm the nervous system and to relieve stress. Other natural products and therapies that are increasingly in demand include sound therapy, cryotherapy, infra-red saunas, and even CBD oil, which is being used in massages, facials and foot scrubs, providing a new form of stress relief. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will document these trends and other new developments, and report on how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.