Editorial Board   

Mr. Redington

Neale Redington

Partner, Deloitte

Redington has been an advisor to major real estate firms for more than 17 years in the REIT and hospitality sectors. He brings opportunities for wealth creation to hotel owner/operators and management companies through performance of annual audits, operations reviews, due diligence procedures, and assistance with initial public offerings. Last year, Redington provided accounting advisory assistance to KSL Recreation with its $2.2 billion sale of luxury resorts, including Grand Wailea and La Quinta Resort, to CNL Hospitality. This was the largest US luxury hospitality transaction during 2004 and was recently awarded "Transaction of the Year" at the Americas Lodging Investment Summit. Redington has been instrumental in many REIT formation transactions, dating back to the early 90s with G&L Realty and Alexander Haagen Properties. More recently, he has worked with Casden Properties, CNL Hotels and Resorts, and CB Richard Ellis. During his career, he has provided due diligence assistance in many major real estate transactions, including Southern California deals such as Cendant's acquisition of Coldwell Banker and Century 21 and national transactions such as Blackstone's acquisition of Homestead Group and KKR's disposition of Red Lion Hotels. Redington is co-author of the Hospitality chapter of the Real Estate Accounting Handbook, and has participated in the development of the 10th Edition of the Uniform System of Accounts for the Lodging Industry. He frequently speaks on hospitality issues at trade events and with the media. Redington attended Birmingham University where he received his BCom(Acc)(Hons). He is active in the Manhattan Beach community where he lives with his wife Marissa and three children.

Mr. Redington can be contacted at 213-688-4762 or nredington@deloitte.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.