Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Sova

Kristine Sova

Attorney, Law Office of Kristine A. Sova

Kristine Sova, formerly an attorney with Venable LLP, launched the Law Office of Kristine A. Sova after a decade of success practicing labor and employment law at some of NYC's premiere law firms. In her practice, Ms. Sova defends employers against allegations of federal, state and local equal employment opportunity, reasonable accommodation, leave, and wage-and-hour law violations. Ms. Sova also devotes a substantial portion of her practice to counseling employers on ways to avoid litigation through business decisions, such as advising on issues pertaining to employee relations, policy and practice development and implementation, employment contracts and separation agreements, termination of employment, and reductions in force, and regularly training managerial and rank-and-file employees on harassment, discrimination and retaliation prevention. Ms. Sova's practice also includes the representation of management in union negotiations as well as in collective bargaining and related disputes before the National Labor Relations Board and in arbitral forums. In addition, Ms. Sova represents clients in audits and investigations conducted by the U.S. Department of Labor and other governmental agencies on issues such as I-9s and employment eligibility as well as misclassification of employees as independent contractors.

Ms. Sova can be contacted at 646-558-2296 or kristine@sovalaw.com

Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.