Library Archives

 
James Gelfand

The corporate meetings segment has become an increasingly perplexing market that still dictates the success or failure of many new and established hotels. Gone are the conference travel norms of yesteryear; today, this segment is made up of a diverse group of consumers who can no longer be defined as one homogenous population. In addition, the lines between business and leisure are becoming increasingly blurred, due to the current economic climate. Taking all this into consideration, hotels can no longer attract meeting planners with simple cookie-cutter products that are delivered in an uninspired format. Read on...

Eric Rahe

The need for more meeting space seems counterintuitive. The ability to meet and connect outside of a defined venue grew exponentially while the supply of meeting space stagnated over the last three years. And yet, many conference centers, resorts, and hotels are reporting that they do not have the meeting space that event planners and the like need to host their meetings and conferences. Creating non-traditional meeting space and location may be one of the most promising opportunities in developing or renovating meeting and conference space. But first, we must understand how consumers are redefining value in terms of meeting venues. Architect Eric M. Rahe, AIA, LEED AP, explores these issues and offers some best practices for meeting the demand for meeting space. Read on...

Debi Scholar

Organizations develop Service Level Agreements (SLAs) and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that may penalize your Hotel for non-performance of service. An SLA formalizes arrangements between an organization and a supplier to deliver specific services, at specific levels, and at an agreed upon price. If the service is not met according to the agreement, the organization may be entitled to some form of compensation such as a payment or a credit. Learn the five steps that Organizations use to develop these SLAs and KPIs and how the remedy for non-performance may be calculated. Read on...

Debi Scholar

Meetings leaders rely on data intelligence from hoteliers to validate their return on investment and meeting analytics. A chain-wide global sales organization should collect client data across all of its brands and locations whether the property is corporate-owned or franchised while an independent property or local hotelier may only have the micro metrics for its location. Before you present any data, understand the key requirements of your client and the type of environment that they are in now so that you can present your data in the order of their priorities. Don't fall into the analysis abyss and think that all metrics are necessary. Instead, use this data checklist and ask your clients what metrics are important to them. Read on...

Robert Gilbert

As an organization that values the feedback of its members and advisory boards in developing exciting new trade show features, HSMAI is on the forefront of the conference industry in order to fuel sales, inspire marketing and optimize revenue for its partners. HSMAI President and CEO Robert Gilbert provides insights into current trends that are being observed at trade shows, including increased pressure on exhibitors to demonstrate ROI, the challenge of attracting attendees who are time impoverished and securing their attention at expo booths, as well as dealing with the increasing costs of exhibiting and producing a trade show. Read on...

Eric Blanc

With the meetings marketplace now more competitive than ever, sales teams are feeling the pressure to enhance their knowledge base about their respective venues to help bring in new business. To help with this, more and more convention centers, hotels and convention and visitors bureaus (CVBs) are beginning to utilize their convention services managers (CSMs) during the sales process. Read on...

Eric Blanc

Whether personal or professional, the meetings industry is primarily based on relationships. Meeting planners are often influenced by their colleagues and the relationships built with the service personnel they work with to help produce successful meetings. Often times, the decision for a meeting planner to return to a venue or destination (or not) rests solely on the ability of convention services managers (CSMs) to develop thriving client relationships. To do this successfully, CSMs at hotels, convention centers and convention and visitors bureaus (CVBs) need to take personal ownership of their client's events and work diligently to fulfill their needs, all while making suggestions to them for improvement and efficiency. Read on...

Eric Blanc

Having some type of green meeting practices in place continues to be an important area of focus for venues in the meetings industry, as a business with one of the largest environmental footprints. In order to successfully have an effect on global warming while reducing costs and saving their respective organizations money, convention centers, hotels and other venues continue to examine how to successfully make these changes-both behind the scenes of their events and in visible ways. Read on...

Eric Blanc

There's no getting around it-social media is here to stay. The question is: How can our industry use these powerful new tools to achieve our communications and marketing goals? Perhaps Einstein, in his infinite wisdom, had the answer-long before anyone put the words "social" and "media" together. Imagination, he said, is more important than knowledge. In the online age, this concept means that people who know how to use social media creatively are destined to surge ahead of those who only have knowledge of the tools. Keeping that in mind, check out six innovative ways to make social media work for you. Read on...

Eric Blanc

No hospitality facility or destination is immune from potential threats and emergencies caused by nature or human action. Considering tragic disasters like 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina or, more recently, the flooding which left the atriums of Nashville's landmark Opryland Resort under 10 feet of water, the time to plan for an emergency certainly isn't in the middle of one. Properties and convention and visitors bureaus (CVB) who take a proactive, collaborative approach to crisis management by creating and continuously updating an emergency plan are far better prepared to respond, minimize negative outcomes and recover faster. Read on...

Marilyn Healey

How important is it for convention services managers (CSMs) at hotels, convention centers and convention and visitors bureaus (CVBs) to work together? According to Devon Sloan, CMP, Director of Events at the Hilton Tucson El Conquistador, a united, consistent approach is paramount to anevent's success. ""There really must be a united front as none of us can succeed without the cooperation of the other," she said. All meeting professionals must keep consistent communication to ensure their clients feel all are united and collectively have their best interests in mind. Read on...

Marilyn Healey

With the demand for technology continuing to grow throughout the meetings industry, convention services managers (CSMs) throughout hotels, convention centers and convention & visitors bureaus have adapted to this demand by utilizing web-based applications and programs to help ensure a smoother event process for their clients. "The housing experience, many times, is the first experience the client will have with a city," said Madonna Carr, CMP, Vice President of Destination Services at Meet Minneapolis. "So if the process isn't smooth or flawless from the beginning, then it sets the tone for the rest of their experience with us." Read on...

Marilyn Healey

While the first and foremost objective of a Convention Services Manager (CSM) at a hotel, convention center or convention and visitors bureau (CVB) is to give meeting planners, their clients and attendees an outstanding customer service experience, CSMs and planners agree that a commitment to continuing education is key to keeping their verve for customer service sharp. Interdisciplinary continuing education opportunities, meaning those that explore best practices in working together with other meeting professionals, can only increase one's expertise, their value to their organization and the likelihood of repeat business for their property. Read on...

Marilyn Healey

The point of this article is that hotel executives and meeting planners can benefit from working with CSMs who have achieved the CMP designation, because they take pride in their work and are the best at what they do. ACOM's goal with every Hotel Executive article is to show how hotel executives and meeting planners can utilize and work together with CSMs to ultimately service the customer more efficientley. This quote used in the article pretty much sums that sentiment. Keith Patrick says: "We're all in the same little boat and the more we standardize meeting planning practices globally, the easier it is to produce consistent and efficient meeting planning results." Read on...

Lynn McCullough

Those of us who represent hotels or convention centers should know that promoting attendance for a conference, convention or tradeshow-without getting to know those you're trying to lure, is like playing poker blindfolded: You can bet all you want, but you won't win anything. The same holds true for "pre-promoting" these events. Pre-promoting is more than just providing copies of your facility's brochure, or promoting the main attractions and sites to see in your host city. Pre-promoting is also about asking yourself the following questions: Who? Where? What? When? Why? - and How? Read on...

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Coming up in October 2019...

Revenue Management: Focus On Profit

Revenue Management is still a relatively new profession within hotel operations and as such, it continues to evolve. One significant trend in this area is a shift away from using revenue as the foundation to generate key performance indicators (KPIs) and to instead place the emphasis on profit. Traditionally, revenue managers have relied on total revenue per available room (TrevPAR) and revenue per available room (RevPAR) as the basis of their KPIs. Now, some revenue managers are using gross operating profit per available room (GOPPAR) as their primary KPI. This puts profit at the center of revenue management strategy, and managers are increasingly searching for new ways to increase the profitability of their hotels. Return on Investment is the objective of any hotel investment, so it is only logical that profitability and ROI will be emphasized going forward. Another trend is an expanded focus on direct hotel bookings. Revenue managers know that one way to increase profitability is to steer guests away from online travel agencies (OTAs) and book directly with the hotel. This tactic also reinforces brand identity and loyalty, and encourages repeat business. In addition, it provides a valuable platform to market the hotel directly to the customer, and to upsell room upgrades or other services to them. Another trend for revenue managers involves automation in their software programs. Revenue management systems with automation are far more desirable than those without it. Automating data entry and logistics increases efficiency, allowing managers to spend more time on formulating strategy. As a bonus, an automated system helps with aggregating and interpreting data. The October issue of the Hotel Business Review will address these developments and document how some leading hotels are executing their revenue management strategies.