Library Archives

 
Michael Goldstein

We've equipped our stylish guest rooms with the most current, cutting-edge technology, provided unparalleled bedding made from the finest Egyptian cotton and luxurious spa-like guest baths and products. Yet all of those amenities and appointments can quickly dissipate in the eyes of our guests if they do not encounter employees who are responsive to their needs and sincerely hospitable. Simply put, it's paramount to remember that the most logical and practical way to outperform your competition is directly through your employees. They are the ambassadors for your hotel - and should be recruited and trained to complement and enhance your multi-million dollar assets. Read on...

Richard D. Hanks

When was the last time you had to do a negative performance review with one of your employees? I mean the kind where you are the bearer of bad news and have to lay down the law in a forceful manner? This type of performance review can be one of the most painful and yet delicate interactions that a manager can have with an employee. In this article, I address a simple, yet effective way to offset two of the more difficult issues related to this type of employee review. They are - (1) the subjective nature of the manager's "evidence" for change, and (2) the "selective memory" of most employees when presented with performance weaknesses. Read on...

Sanjay Nijhawan

Fail to look after your people, be they staff or customers, and you won't be around for long - whether you're selling shoes, diamond watches or burgers. In the hospitality industry duty of care, at a premium standard, for both staff and guests is what makes the difference between a good hotel and a great one. It is certainly true that the hotel business certainly has to go a step further when it comes to its 'people'. If anything, the emphasis on getting your employment and retention policies 'righter' than the rest is even more marked and important. Hotels are in a pretty unique position in that what they provide for customers in terms of experience is 100% in the hands of the team on the ground. And since you are running a 24-hour operation, it means genuine consistency of service is required throughout each guest's stay. Read on...

Kim Hehir

As the world's largest single industry, the hospitality industry as a whole continues to become more complex, competitive, global, and technological. As such, the industry struggles with a high percentage of low-skilled or unskilled workers and a scarcity of well-trained personnel at management levels. In this ever-changing environment, companies are looking for employees who will be successful in tomorrow's economy. These people should possess specialized job skills and should be able to think critically, communicate clearly, manage ethically and contribute to the community. Therefore, attention must be given to improving the level recruitment and training provided to potential managers, especially if they are responsible for delivering the experience demanded by the luxury traveler today. Read on...

Mike Paton

Today's hotel guest is more informed and demanding than ever. With dozens of choices at the fingertips of potential guests, how can your hotel rise above the crowd? To capture a bigger share of the market, your employees must focus on delivering more bang for the buck than your competition. Otherwise, guests decide where to stay primarily based on price and location. And that means you're nothing more than a commodity to most of your customers. Hotels with a guest-centered sales culture outperform competitors by building more value into every guest interaction. When your sales and service team is dedicated to providing a special experience for each traveler, you create preference and loyalty with your guests. And that helps you fill your hotel at a higher rate. Sounds simple, right? Anyone who's tried to build and maintain a sales culture knows it's not easy. But in working with more than 5,000 companies since 1986, we've found that it can be done by following three basic steps... Read on...

Jason Ferrara

The hospitality industry is in the business of making people feel at home when they're away from home. The employees decide whether the guests have a positive or negative experience and, either way, those guests will talk about it. That is why it is so critical that hotels and lodging facilities take measures today to ensure that they have those top performers on staff that will provide guests with an optimum experience and keep them coming back. According to a recent nationwide survey from CareerBuilder.com, nearly six-in-ten hospitality workers say they plan to leave their current jobs in pursuit of better opportunities by the end of 2005. To better understand the impetus behind this wake-up call for employers, let's take a closer look at what factors are driving dissatisfaction with their current positions. Read on...

Jason Ferrara

The US Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that hospitality jobs will increase 17 percent through 2012; meanwhile, the industry's turnover rate was nearly twice that of all occupations last month. The magnitude of the industry's turnover is demonstrated by a recent nationwide survey by CareerBuilder.com. According to the survey, about 12 percent of hospitality workers plan to leave their jobs in the fourth quarter of 2005. Read on...

Robert Plotka

Rehabilitation and adaptive reuse of our nation's historic and pre-1936 buildings continue to be a hot trend in the real estate development industry, particularly as many American cities promote and encourage urban renewal projects in their downtown and historic areas. In most cases, it takes more than deep pockets and the divine inspiration of the developer to bring a historic building back to life. developers involved in rehabilitating historic buildings should promote teamwork, include experienced professionals, and expect the unexpected. A critical success factor is the developer's willingness and ability to assemble a strong team of experienced professionals to carry out the project. With a strong development team, the project may not only run more smoothly but also be perceived more favorably by investors and lenders while obtaining better terms in the process. Here are some helpful hints when selecting development team members for a historic rehabilitation tax credit project: Read on...

Jason Ferrara

Workplace diversity is hardly a new notion. The push for diversity gained prominence in the 1970s and 1980s as an influx of women entered the workforce. When EEOC reporting requirements emerged in the 1990s, the concept took on even greater importance. Today, embracing diversity means far more than creating more and equal opportunities for black and Hispanic workers. Diversity initiatives also benefit Asians, Native Americans, women, people with disabilities, and gay and lesbian workers. Read on...

Sandy Heydt

Raise your hand if you have had a bad boss. I am sure everyone reading this has raised both hands, and raised them pretty quickly! We often remember our bad bosses more readily than we do our good ones, because the experience was so unpleasant and disappointing. And sometimes we are so harmed by the experience it can take us a long time to get over it. Now think about the good bosses you have had. I hope you have had at least one in your career. Why were they good? Why was the experience working for them so invigorating and memorable? Wouldn't you like to create such an environment for anyone under your area of supervision? Read on...

Neale Redington

Despite millions of unemployed workers, there is an acute shortage of talent across industries. The hotel industry is no exception and with this industry growing at an exponential rate, the talent shortage hits especially hard. As more facilities are opening to tourists, hotels are in dire need of general managers to implement human resource strategies that build a foundation and reputation for a positive work environment, sales managers that are committed to the customer's needs, and housekeeping staff that understands and respects the importance of image - just to cite a few examples. Read on...

Steven Belmonte

How often do you as a hotel owner or manager stop to help an employee who may be struggling to keep up with his or her day-to-day tasks? What have you done to motivate the employee who simply doesn't care about doing a good job or going the extra mile to please a guest because it's just a job, a way to collect a paycheck?. With no risk and no up-front-cost, hoteliers can increase a line-level employees' take-home pay by as much as $130 a month, provide better voluntary benefits to employees, and thus decrease employee turnover. Read on...

Jason Ferrara

It takes a lot of people to make a hotel feel like home for its guests. So it's not surprising that the hospitality industry is a major component of the overall U.S. labor force. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the accommodations and food services industry makes up 8.1 percent of all employment. And Americans aren't abandoning their vacations or business outings anytime soon. The hospitality industry is expected to grow 18 percent and add more than 1.6 million new jobs through 2012, according to BLS data. But while we're in the business of making others feel cared for, the labor market won't be very comfortable for hospitality employers in coming years. Read on...

Show Per Page
Coming up in March 2019...

Human Resources: An Era of Transition

Traditionally, the human resource department administers five key areas within a hotel operation - compliance, compensation and benefits, organizational dynamics, selection and retention, and training and development. However, HR professionals are also presently involved in culture-building activities, as well as implementing new employee on-boarding practices and engagement initiatives. As a result, HR professionals have been elevated to senior leadership status, creating value and profit within their organization. Still, they continue to face some intractable issues, including a shrinking talent pool and the need to recruit top-notch employees who are empowered to provide outstanding customer service. In order to attract top-tier talent, one option is to take advantage of recruitment opportunities offered through colleges and universities, especially if they have a hospitality major. This pool of prospective employees is likely to be better educated and more enthusiastic than walk-in hires. Also, once hired, there could be additional training and development opportunities that stem from an association with a college or university. Continuing education courses, business conferences, seminars and online instruction - all can be a valuable source of employee development opportunities. In addition to meeting recruitment demands in the present, HR professionals must also be forward-thinking, anticipating the skills that will be needed in the future to meet guest expectations. One such skill that is becoming increasingly valued is “resilience”, the ability to “go with the flow” and not become overwhelmed by the disruptive influences  of change and reinvention. In an era of transition—new technologies, expanding markets, consolidation of brands and businesses, and modifications in people's values and lifestyles - the capacity to remain flexible, nimble and resilient is a valuable skill to possess. The March Hotel Business Review will examine some of the strategies that HR professionals are employing to ensure that their hotel operations continue to thrive.