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Cristine Henderson

Site integration is a crucial step in designing a hotel and, when applied appropriately, has the power to impact guest satisfaction as well as the owner's business objectives and can even translate into a real value and return on investment. In this article, Cristine Henderson, AIA, NCARB, Associate Vice President at Hoefer Wysocki, shares the most important considerations when applying site integration in a hotel's design. Considerations include designing to increase the building's overall visibility and accessibility, while incorporating local inspiration and environmental influences. A designer's skills, creativity and mindfulness produce opportunities to build hotel interiors and exteriors that reflect and make use of local surroundings and enhance the overall guest experience. Read on...

Scott Acton

Form and function are two critical components of building design. That statement might be a no-brainer for some, but we often fail to connect how this relates to our experience of a space. It's safe to say we have all reaped the benefits of experiential design, but it was most likely unknowingly. Scott Acton, CEO and founder of Forte Specialty Contractors, shares his thoughts on experiential design and how its changing the hospitality and entertainment sector. Read on...

David Dionne

In an ever-increasingly competitive hospitality marketplace, owners and operators look to enhance their competitive advantage by providing uniquely positive, memorable experiences. Hotel and resort owners and operators agree that a hospitality brand holds the potential to create such novel guest experiences through the amenities leaders select for the brand's identity. What is a really unique and novel amenity? A really great playground. What makes a great playground? A great playground stimulates a child's imagination, allows children to build confidence through experience and skill building opportunities and can be designed for kids of all abilities and ages. Read on...

Felicia Hyde

Biophilia, a love of life and the living world, continues to gain popularity in today’s modern built environment – especially as our population continues to urbanize. As a result, businesses, hotels and apartment communities across the world are incorporating biophilic design by infusing direct and indirect natural elements to create environments that promote health, wellness and productivity. While this design concept is already transforming the hotel industry, hoteliers can leverage design strategies from multifamily and residential communities to effectively create spaces that elevate the human-nature connection and guest experience to convert one-time guests into repeat visitors. Read on...

David Ashen

The quick pace of change in devices and systems powered by ever-advancing technology makes it a challenge when thinking about the design of a hotel. With today's hoteliers looking at innovative ways to incorporate rapidly changing advancements in technology in their properties to enhance customer experience and streamline energy consumption, David Ashen, founder and partner of interior design and brand consulting firm dash design, examines intelligent buildings and other forward-thinking hi-tech concepts leading the way in hotel design along with guest accommodation and amenities. The future is in smart or intelligent buildings and totally integrated systems that can do several things that enhance the guest experience and manage energy consumption, so costs are minimized. Read on...

John Tess

According to one report, millennials account for a third of all hotel guests world-wide; a number that is projected to increase to 50% by 2020. To attract this market, hotels need to focus on providing a unique experience, mixed with good design and aesthetics. Studies indicated that Millennials value unique, authentic, value-rich, community-based hotel properties. To meet this demand, boutique hotels as well as national chains are developing new properties specifically targeting this niche. At the same time, there are many hotel properties that embraced Millennial values as part of their business philosophy. One particular Pacific Northwest firm, McMenamins, was “millennial” before they were born. Read on...

Lawrence Adams

The design style, ambiance, services and amenities usually associated with hotels are finding their way into buildings and facilities other than hotels and resorts. Owners and operators of Hospitals, Senior Living Communities, Airports, Student Housing, Office Buildings and Residential Buildings are all finding that their users are demanding more in the way of a hospitality experience than their traditional, and often institutional, trappings provide. As with hospitality design the process for these other building types involves an approach that incorporates innovative design to please, delight and engage the intellect, creating environments that are experiential by nature. Read on...

Ray Chung

A well-designed floorplan is essential to a restaurant’s success. No matter how good the food is, it needs to be served efficiently and elegantly, and it is the floorplan that determines how well each service will run. The keys to a good plan lie in coordinating and balancing the needs of both the servers and the guests. From the location of the kitchen to the exact width of the seats, every decision matters. When done well, ADA requirements can benefit all guests, with gentle, sufficiently wide paths and ample space for strollers as well as wheelchairs. Read on...

Jackson Thilenius

Today’s guests, whether they are hotel or hospital guests, come with incredibly high expectations of hospitality. How does wellness fold into this equation and contribute to the overall guest experience? What does the future of hospitality and healthcare hold as it relates to the wellness factor? Jackson Thilenius, Principal at Retail Design Collaborative, explores the integration of these two disciplines and the implications for hospitality and healthcare brands sparked by the traction of the trillion-dollar wellness industry. Read on...

Scott Acton

Millennials have become the fastest growing consumer segment in the hospitality industry. They have also become one of the most discerning audiences, demanding authenticity, connection and social responsibility from the brands they invest in. Hospitality brands must now look at the entirety of their mix of products from the design aspects of their properties to how they are creating guest engagement and entertainment in order to attract new customers and keep current ones loyal. Scott Acton, CEO and founder of Forte Specialty Contractors breaks down how to design F&B for this new generation to create long-term loyalty. Read on...

David Ashen

While the demand for hotel rooms far out-paces the number of overnighters staying in Airbnb properties, year-over revenue produced by Airbnbs has risen noticeably, almost doubling in 2016, putting many hoteliers on notice. As the hospitality industry reacts to the modern traveler’s trending desire for heightened experiences through intimate lodgings that embrace the local vibe, like those provided by Airbnbs, David Ashen, principal and founder of interior design and brand consulting firm dash design, shares ways that hotels are adapting to meet those desires, including features that compete with the rise of locally driven Airbnbs. Read on...

Jason Bramhall VI

Hospitality procurement involves significantly more than on-time and under-budget deliveries. In fact, a better way to describe what a procurement professional does is that they orchestrate an intensive and multifaceted process with an incredible amount moving parts at a given time. Because of the complexity and artistry involved in the processes that procurement teams utilize, there can be some uncertainty about what it is that they exactly do. Perhaps best known for on-time deliveries and transparent pricing, the reality of procurement is that team members engage themselves in much more creative, fluid and proactive roles throughout the entire design process. Read on...

Felicia Hyde

A shift is taking place in the hospitality industry as travelers are growingly seeking accommodation that provides unique experiences and a taste of the local culture of their travel destination. This concept plays an important consideration in the design of multifamily properties across the nation and a host of design strategies have been deployed to help property owners attract and retain today’s largest consumer generation – millennials. From design strategies to meet millennials’ needs and research concepts that cater to the local market, to tips for designing inviting community spaces, award-winning interior architect, Felicia Hyde shares her perspective on multifamily design strategies that can help hoteliers boost curb appeal and attract more guests. Read on...

John Tess

In the last several decades, boutique hotels have become a major part of the hospitality market. This article looks at the early development of boutique hotels on the west and east coasts during the 1980’s, and how those early concepts have been embraced by the hotel industry. Boutique hotels are a natural use for historic buildings. The history of the building (and associated neighborhood and city) can be used for thematic and design elements, while many historic buildings offer central locations advantageous to hoteliers. As part of this discussion, the article examines Kimpton’s Hotel Palomar in Philadelphia as an example. Read on...

Lawrence Adams

In this article we explore Mass Tourism’s impact on destinations where large numbers of tourist visit the same location, often at the same time of year. We look at examples that have both positive impacts, including improved local economy and negative impacts, including environmental degradation, on a location’s ecology and culture. Many local governments, such as the Philippians, and tourism corporations, such as The Walt Disney Company, are beginning to address the negative impacts of Mass Tourism and to promote a program of sustainable tourism. Read on...

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Coming up in January 2020...

Mobile Technology: Meeting Tech Expectations

What once seemed futuristic is now the norm, owing to the escalating developments in mobile technology, and hotels must continue to innovate in order to meet guest expectations. In a recent study from Mower, 65 percent of guests said they would gladly pay more for a hotel that provides the mobile technology they deem essential. The same study shows that 44 percent of travelers are more likely to book a smart hotel, and nearly 7 in 10 want to use smart devices provided by the hotel. And how do guests wish to use all this technology? A majority expressed a desire for mobile check-in and check-out, and mobile payment options. They also want to be able to stream content from their phone to the TV; to make service requests of the hotel staff; to control in-room lighting, temperature and sound; to order food and beverages; and to request a wake-up call - all from their mobile device. Guests also expressed preferences for robust wi-fi and convenient device charging ports throughout the hotel. They also appreciate the use of hotel branded apps which allow a guest to book a room, access loyalty programs, receive discounts and rewards, and even use the app to choose the room, floor and view they prefer. Some hotel apps also allow a customer to track their charges throughout their stay, rather than waiting to receive a bill at the end. Finally, mobile tech lounges are popping up more frequently in some hotels. These lounges offer guests the opportunity to perform tasks like airline check-ins or access to local info guides, but they also provide a place where guests can comfortably get some work done outside their room. The January Hotel Business Review will report on what some hotels are doing to meet their customers' expectations in the mobile technology space.