Library Archives

 
Kelly McGuire

Hotel Revenue Management (RM) is maturing, and more and more hotels have implemented RM programs along with advanced RM software to automate pricing. As the discipline matures, the law of diminishing returns begins to apply. More and more effort is required to squeeze our fewer and fewer dollars from hotel rooms. Smart revenue managers are turning to revenue generating assets outside of the hotel room, like function space , restaurants , golf courses and spa, as the next potential for revenue gains. In a world where most hoteliers are already doing more with less, how do you even get started? READ MORE

Kelly McGuire

It is clear that revenue management practices can help hotels increase revenue, but successful revenue management counts on consumers being willing to pay different prices for essentially the same product, based on the hotel's expectation of demand. Hotel managers have good reason to be concerned about negative consumer reaction to demand-based pricing. Research has shown that consumers will punish firms that they perceive to be acting unfairly in their pricing strategies by refusing to patronize them in the future. So, how can hotels balance the risk of negative consumer reactions with the benefits of variable pricing? READ MORE

Paul van Meerendonk

With Conferences & Events revenues accounting for a significant portion of a hotels financial performance, an increasing number of companies are starting to focus on these activities to support their facility's bottom lines. However, with the rise in prominence of Conferences & Events, there are a number of key issues that savvy revenue managers should consider, including: what are the key issues needing to be addressed when trying to optimize conference & events space and more importantly how will the role of the revenue manager look in the future? READ MORE

Paul van Meerendonk

For many hoteliers, 2010 will forever go down in history as the one that got away. As the economic downturn bottomed out, hoteliers around the globe received an unexpected boost from international tourism demand which offset some of the implications of financial recession. Future forecasts are frustratingly mixed. Whilst some financiers are flying the flag for recovery, naysayers continue to cast doubt with cries of a double dip recession. As long as savvy hoteliers are amply prepared with the right intelligence, they will make educated and informed decisions when developing their negotiating strategies for 2012 and enter into the year in a strong position. READ MORE

Kelly McGuire

Revenue management and marketing really are two sides of the same coin. Each department holds key pieces of information about demand that, when integrated, result in critical insight about demand patterns, product preferences and purchase behavior. Unfortunately, employees in these two closely related functions do not always work well together. Misaligned goals and poor communication result in situations where marketers, with a goal of generating demand, sends out discount promotions that dilute rates during peak periods. While revenue managers, trying to maximize revenue, close off promotional rates meant to encourage stays from the most loyal guests. These conflicting activities damage revenue performance and guest relationships. READ MORE

Kristie Dickinson

Lodging experts have written numerous articles on revenue management aimed at addressing specific tactical issues on pricing, distribution and measuring results for those "inside" the operation. By contrast, this article is intended for the "outsider" - namely individuals closely vested in hotel performance, but not directly involved in daily operations…hotel Owners. While the art and science of revenue management should be left in the hands of the property management and asset management teams, here are some key considerations which may be helpful to hotel owners in evaluating the role and effectiveness of revenue management and understanding the influence it can have on hotel performance and overall asset value. READ MORE

Paul van Meerendonk

Progressive hoteliers spend significant time analyzing their properties and identify areas where revenue potential can be expanded through packaging a range of services. While areas such as food and beverage, spa facilities, conference facilities and even additional leisure options such as golf courses, make up a hotelier's overall 'Asset', often overlooked is the role hotel technology can play in helping to package and promote offerings that expand beyond room rates. READ MORE

Brandon Edwards

There are two ways to increase profits - raising revenue or lowering costs. Hospitality employers often miss opportunities to lower costs by missing valuable tax savings attributable to hiring incentives. The federal government provides businesses with tax credits for hiring members of disadvantaged groups. This often represents a larger share of a hotel's staff than one would imagine. A member of a targeted group can be as simple as someone who lives in a designated area to one of the 40 million plus recipients of food stamps. Overall, a hospitality employer can expect between 15% and 25% of new hires to qualify for tax credits. Here is a rundown of the major programs to look at for 2011... READ MORE

Glenn Pedersen

How are you monitoring your direct sales force efforts? Who do you count as a member of the sales team? How often are you validating their effectiveness and what are the measurement criteria you are using? Who is interacting with the sales team on a daily, weekly and/or monthly basis? How often does the sales team speak with the revenue management team? Who is on the REVENUE MANAGEMENT TEAM? The answers to each one of these questions can be the difference between success and failure, between REVPAR growth or lost business. READ MORE

Mike Kistner

Recovery continues in both the corporate and leisure travel markets. While the leisure sector sustains a slow but steady pace, corporate travel has eclipsed the recovery with both strong booking volumes and record-high growth in average daily rates (ADR). However, despite the significant increases in reservations of greater than +24% over 2009 each month since April, according to data reported in The Pegasus View, hotel revenue is still being hampered by weak ADRs, particularly in the leisure sector. What's a hotel to do? Examine and understand the state of their rates, then seize control of their pricing strategy by understanding their market position, their guests and their resources. READ MORE

Paul van Meerendonk

There's no doubt that the speed with which the hotel industry is evolving is accelerating, and more often than not, hoteliers are being forced to constantly evaluate and re-evaluate throughout the year to ensure that revenue is being maximised. Given the growing influence of channel management in recent years, hoteliers across the globe are having to plan very carefully for the future and ensure that the right strategies are in place to work with organisations like Online Travel Agencies (OTAs) - who wield more power than ever before. READ MORE

Glenn Pedersen

Whether the economy is in good shape or bad shape, Revenue Management is a tool, if used successfully, will drive increased sales and bottom line profits. Revenue Management is something everyone knows about but not everyone uses. While there is normally a cost to implementing this at your hotel, there is also an intuitive cost if you don't use it. Our desk clerks are not trained reservation agents and in most Property Management Systems these same desk clerks have the ability to make reservations at the front desk. Unfortunately, they also have the ability to by-pass revenue management strategies in that same system with very little difficulty. Why do we allow this to occur when the remedy is so easy... easy for the customer, easy for the desk clerk and easy for the top line as well as the bottom line. READ MORE

Brandon Edwards

Many hospitality employers may not be aware of the numerous state and federal  hiring-based tax incentive programs available to them and the benefits these can have on their bottom line. With the most current tax incentive programs in place, hospitality employers can receive an average of over $600 per new employee hired.  Over a three year period, including retroactive credits, this can easily add up to hundreds of thousands of dollars per location. Here are some best practices on implementing such programs, specifically the Work Opportunity Tax Credit, the Hire Now Tax Cut and the Enterprise Zone and Empowerment Zones programs. READ MORE

Brandon Edwards

Most business executives don't feel they are getting much out of the federal stimulus initiatives. But hospitality employers are well-positioned to capitalize on one such initiative: the HIRE Act hiring-based tax incentive program. Hotel operators can claim tax benefits of roughly $750 per qualified hire, and at least half of new hires will qualify. The HIRE Act is not only good for the economy because it encourages companies to bring people back into the workforce, but it's also great for the bottom line. Here are some guidelines on how the HIRE Act works and how to implement a screening program. READ MORE

Paul van Meerendonk

In these economic times, hoteliers across the globe need to be more aggressive in pursuing demand in order to deliver profitability. Ensuring coordination between key hotel operational departments is paramount in targeting the right guests and helping to establish customer loyalty amongst profitable guests. In this environment, hotel owners and managers alike need to be mindful that their marketing and revenue management departments are working together and it is important that open channels of communication are maintained. Both the marketing and revenue management departments are unfortunately siloed in many companies, but each holds an important key to the business, which, when used together, become a powerful tool for generating hotel revenue. READ MORE

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Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.