Landscaping Around High-Traffic Areas

By Ken Hutcheson President, U.S. Lawns | April 26, 2015

All hoteliers—no matter what size their properties are—have high-traffic areas.
From the moment a guest walks onto the property, to the moment he or she leaves, high-traffic areas can impact a guest’s experience. Since high-traffic areas are the most densely populated parts of the property, it’s important to have a well-designed landscaping plan to keep those areas property crisp, clean, and safe.

Hardscapes

Hardscapes, such as sidewalks, walkways, and footpaths, play an important role in the way high-traffic areas function. They help define the landscape’s border, direct people to their preferred routes, and help guests enjoy amenities on the property. Without the use of hardscapes, guests would be walking aimlessly around the property (which is a hotelier’s worst nightmare.) Just like with sidewalks located in cities or suburbs, hardscapes are a great resource to help hotels regulate foot-traffic.

Hardscapes are also great opportunities to promote your hotel’s brand message. For example, if your brand message is about creating a relaxing environment and a place to escape, like a Sandals or the Atlantis, subtle winding paths are a great way to lead guests to the pool and spa areas, as well as to the gardens and fountains areas. However, if your hotel is located in a major city, or is an efficiency hotel, those types of hardscapes aren’t needed.

Planting Around Hardscapes

The landscapes surrounding walkways and footpaths will be vulnerable to damage that results from foot traffic. The goal of your landscaping should be to keep guests off of grass and gardens. The best way to protect your grass is by planting landscape beds around walkways. Landscape beds work to add greenery and highlight a property’s features, while helping to regulate traffic and re-directing guests back onto sidewalks.

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Diego Lowenstein
Naseem Javed
Tema Frank
Frank Meek
Shannon Dooley
Tara K. Gorman
Michael Kasprzyk
Steve Kiesner
Roberta Nedry
Mark Heymann
Coming up in July 2018...

Hotel Spa: Oasis Unplugged

The driving force in current hotel spa trends is the effort to manage unprecedented levels of stress experienced by their clients. Feeling increasingly overwhelmed by demanding careers and technology overload, people are craving places where they can go to momentarily escape the rigors of their daily lives. As a result, spas are positioning themselves as oases of unplugged human connection, where mindfulness and contemplation activities are becoming increasingly important. One leading hotel spa offers their clients the option to experience their treatments in total silence - no music, no talking, and no advice from the therapist - just pure unadulterated silence. Another leading hotel spa is working with a reputable medical clinic to develop a “digital detox” initiative, in which clients will be encouraged to unplug from their devices and engage in mindfulness activities to alleviate the stresses of excessive technology use. Similarly, other spas are counseling clients to resist allowing technology to monopolize their lives, and to engage in meditation and gratitude exercises in its place. The goal is to provide clients with a warm, inviting and tranquil sanctuary from the outside world, in addition to also providing genuine solutions for better sleep, proper nutrition, stress management and natural self-care. To accomplish this, some spas are incorporating a variety of new approaches - cryotherapy, Himalayan salt therapy and ayurveda treatments are becoming increasingly popular. Other spas are growing their own herbs and performing their treatments in lush outdoor gardens. Some spa therapists are being trained to assess a client's individual movement patterns to determine the most beneficial treatment specifically for them. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will report on these trends and developments and examine how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.