Here Come the Kid$

By Bonnie Knutson Professor, The School of Hospitality Business/MSU | July 17, 2016

When most of us were youngsters, the notion of children having much say in what our parents did, what they bought, or where the family stayed when it went on vacation was in the realm of comedian Rodney Dangerfield. They got no respect. Now, kids are – or should be – on virtually every brand's radar screen. Overall social and cultural trends have bolstered kids' monetary muscle. Consider the dramatic rise in their purchase power.

Back in the 1960s, children influenced about $5 billion in family purchases. These were the days of children being seen but not heard. Their primary tool of influence was what my parents called "nagging." We called it wearing them down. By the 1980s, parents began to involve their children more in family decisions so their influence power jumped to more than $50 billion. Today, try going out to grab a bite to eat or deciding whether to go to a theme park, dude ranch or stay in a historic hotel in a big city without talking with your kids and you' can be doomed to a really bumpy vacation.

Today's family is an inclusive family, with parents empowering and encouraging their kids to be involved in decisions across the board. If hotels have not yet realized the potential of this market trend, business sure has. Companies spend more than $1.2 Trillion (That's with a "T"!) annually marketing to children because they represent a dynamic retail market, influencing an estimated $500 billion in total retail spending. Marketing to children has evolved from the initial days of "secret decoder rings" and Cracker Jack toys. Today, kids are considered to be customers in their own right. Ask Disney. Ask Noggin.com.

Ask McDonald's, Nike, or True Jeans. They represent an important demographic to marketers because they have their own money, they influence what their parents do, where they go, where they stay, and what they buy. Plus they are the adult consumers of the future. Trends such as smaller family size, multi-generational families, dual incomes and postponing having children until later in life mean that parents (and grandparents alike) have more disposable income and are willing to spend more for and on their kids. Add to this the role guilt can play because parents are time-stressed and you have a potential gold mine for your hotel. Sound familiar?

YouGov research found that children are "active decision makers in family economies" across a lot of decisions – including travel. They also found that young children can hold as much persuasive power as teens. From a young age, children's preferences influence where the family goes and where the family stays 87% of the time. And this is true across geographic markets too. No matter where you live in Europe or the U.S., for instance, the vast majority of parents give their children some say in deciding where they want to go on a trip, whether for a weekend getaway or a more traditional family vacation.

Interestingly, in the U.S. about 71% of parents say they ask for their kids' input, but this jumps to 94% internationally. So just where are your guests coming from? Parents view kids' input as a way to ensure that their children get more out of the family's travel experiences. And it's also a way to reduce the nagging quotient too. As Brian Sharples, HomeAway CEO, quipped, "The whole family is now invested in the experience, with kids bringing their own travel preferences to the table." Parents are listening. So are hotels, resorts, spas, cruise ships, Airbnbs, and Bed & Breakfasts. Are you?

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Edward Donaldson
Neal Cox
Thomas E. Pastore
Mike Kistner
Adria Levtchenko
Sam Cicero
Tom O'Rourke
David Ashen
Jane Segerberg
Jason Ferrara
Coming up in March 2019...

Human Resources: An Era of Transition

Traditionally, the human resource department administers five key areas within a hotel operation - compliance, compensation and benefits, organizational dynamics, selection and retention, and training and development. However, HR professionals are also presently involved in culture-building activities, as well as implementing new employee on-boarding practices and engagement initiatives. As a result, HR professionals have been elevated to senior leadership status, creating value and profit within their organization. Still, they continue to face some intractable issues, including a shrinking talent pool and the need to recruit top-notch employees who are empowered to provide outstanding customer service. In order to attract top-tier talent, one option is to take advantage of recruitment opportunities offered through colleges and universities, especially if they have a hospitality major. This pool of prospective employees is likely to be better educated and more enthusiastic than walk-in hires. Also, once hired, there could be additional training and development opportunities that stem from an association with a college or university. Continuing education courses, business conferences, seminars and online instruction - all can be a valuable source of employee development opportunities. In addition to meeting recruitment demands in the present, HR professionals must also be forward-thinking, anticipating the skills that will be needed in the future to meet guest expectations. One such skill that is becoming increasingly valued is “resilience”, the ability to “go with the flow” and not become overwhelmed by the disruptive influences  of change and reinvention. In an era of transition—new technologies, expanding markets, consolidation of brands and businesses, and modifications in people's values and lifestyles - the capacity to remain flexible, nimble and resilient is a valuable skill to possess. The March Hotel Business Review will examine some of the strategies that HR professionals are employing to ensure that their hotel operations continue to thrive.