Library Archives

 
Stephen J. Renard

Do you wish to be a Movie Star and record your own video outlining the highlights of your career and what you can offer a new employer? How would you like to be interviewed by a robot? If you think these are Star Wars interview, you are wrong. They are going on now. We all know that over the last few years, many companies have had filters on applications they receive and if certain words are present, they will review the resumes. If these buzz words are not, they will send the resumes on a one way ride to cyber space. Read on...

Megan Schuyler

While the busy summer season may have just wrapped up for most hotels, another equally busy season is right around the corner: the winter holidays. According to a past Hotels.com survey, about 58 percent of Americans plan to travel within the U.S. over the holidays. Of those who are planning to travel, about 43 percent of respondents prefer to stay in a hotel rather than at a family member's house. This surge of guests means opportunity to receive positive reviews, so your hotel should make delivering top-notch customer service a priority. To do so, having a strong, reliable workforce is critical. Read on...

Ken Edwards

Training is an important aspect in every hotel as it is the basis for cultivating superior guest service, maintaining costs, retaining employees and increasing profitability. While some owners and operators may question the return on investment (ROI) of training, the effects of not placing importance on consistent, ongoing staff training can be far greater over the long run. Preparing employees for situations, outlining role responsibilities and explaining how they are important in overall success can lead to happier employees, alleviate misunderstandings, skirt potential issues and result in better guest experience. That leaves more time for staying focused and creating a positive guest experience. Read on...

Lizz Chambers

You show up at 8am for a training workshop, dreading it all week. Right as you are about to step inside, you stop and the question pops into your mind, “Why am I here? Will this be worth my ever-so-fleeting time? And if they make me play games, I think I may be forced to commit hara-kiri.” Does this sound even remotely familiar? Games do not have to be painful or embarrassing. Some games, such as bouncing a beach ball, everyone standing on a sheet and turning it over without anyone leaving the sheet, lining up according to shoe size and everything in between have their place. We've been through them all. Read on...

Zoe Connolly

As the summer draws to a close, and many seasonal getaways get ready to wrap their busy-season, the Back-to-School phenomenon kicks itself into high-gear. While kids will get new clothes, haircuts, shoes, notebooks and backpacks,job seekers should do the same (all right, maybe they don't need the Hello Kitty lunchbox). And just like teachers are getting their classrooms set up with new activities for their incoming class, the end of the summer is a great time for hoteliers to refocus their recruiting efforts, gearing up for their next incoming group of team members. Read on...

Mike Burgelin

Still crawling out of the recession, businesses continue to employ a conservative approach with every decision affecting the bottom-line. This offers an even bigger challenge in the hotel industry, where guests expect top-notch properties at an outstanding rate. With the internet providing a seemingly endless array of travel review websites ready to critique each aspect of your property to offer affordable alternatives, how does a hotel stay profitable while keeping guests happy (and writing positive reviews)? Read on...

Mark Heymann

The days of having service industry workers wait by the phone to learn if they're needed or not, or sending people home when demand doesn't meet projections, are numbered if not already gone. The efforts of workers' rights organizations to eliminate on-call scheduling combined with growing demand from millennial workers for more flexibility and work-life balance is giving rise to the need for more predictive scheduling practices --- and the advanced technology required to support them. As the service industry is a pretty much a pure "just in time" environment, demand-based scheduling that balances company, customer and staff needs has become more critical with the advent of new employee expectations. Read on...

Zoe Connolly

Corporate culture is critical to ensuring that the experience guests actually receive is representative of the experience that hotel leadership hopes to portray. Culture can be affected in any number of ways, from management implementing employee appreciation programs to maintain top talent, through far less formal interactions like a couple of workers putting together a plan to ensure there's coffee to start a shift together. It can be augmented, strengthened, improved, measured, and yes; culture can be ruined. Read on...

Joy Rothschild

High potential talent retention is the thing that keeps me up at night. And nowhere is this a greater challenge than with millennials. I am thrilled when they stay and grow with us, and heartbroken when I have invested in them and they leave. Our industry needs new paradigms to attract, motivate and retain millennials. The expectation that they will manage their careers “the way we did” must be cast aside. Millennials are quickly becoming the foundation of successful companies today surpassing Gen Xers as the largest generation in the U.S. Labor Force according to Pew Research Center. Read on...

Ken Edwards

Hiring and retaining great talent is by far one of the most challenging aspects facing businesses today. Hotel owners or operators know all too well that employee turnover in hospitality is high - and it can cost your property 100-200% of an employee's total compensation. In fact, the U.S. Bureau for National Affairs estimates employee turnover costs U.S. businesses $11 billion annually. So, what can you do to lessen turnover and keep those dollars flowing through to your bottom line? Focus on employee engagement. Read on...

Mark Heymann

After a seven-year stagnation, the federal minimum wage is poised to follow the lead of cities and states across the U.S. that have passed measures to raise wages for their lowest-paid workers. Service industry employers who fail to prepare for the higher labor costs that will come with the minimum-wage increase and its subsequent ripple effect on their pay ladder will likely experience a dollar-for-dollar negative impact on their bottom line. To offset the higher labor costs will require organizations to take a hard look at their business model for opportunities to improve productivity. Read on...

Marky Moore

This year, several state and local governments are raising their minimum wage rates, and federal law may soon follow suit. Given the large number of low-wage workers that they employ, hotels will be particularly affected by these changing requirements. Faced with increased operating costs, hotels often implement measures, such as downsizing workers, that threaten to impair guest satisfaction. Fortunately, the tax code offers another solution known as the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC). A straightforward and lucrative incentive, WOTC provides businesses with tax savings ranging from $1,200 to $9,600 for each new employee hired from certain target groups. Read on...

Nicole Perrotta

Many articles provide tips on how to deal with angry customers such as "don't take the angry outburst personally", "sympathize with the customer and get them to calm before solving their problem" and "maintain an assertive, positive and calm attitude". All are excellent tools and your team will achieve high customer service scores if they apply them. However, do you have a plan to deal with the anger that creates havoc "behind the scenes" when the customer isn't looking? If you don't, you are probably dealing with high turnover rates and wondering how to fix it. Read on...

Susan Tinnish

As the Dean in a college program with many international students, I speak firsthand about how these students enrich the college culture. Their unique perspectives and backgrounds help create a special atmosphere in classes. Relishing this richness, I have written this article to encourage hotels and other companies to consider hiring an international student through Optional Practical Training (OPT) to realize some of these same benefits. OPT is a period during which students with F-1 status who have completed or have been pursuing their degrees are permitted to work for one year towards gaining practical training to complement their field of studies. OPT is an easy, cost-effective method for hoteliers to hire international students. Read on...

Zoe Connolly

Employee appreciation programs are critical in retaining top talent and maintaining morale. While it's easy to dismiss "perks" as something only millennials care about, it's important to note that 1) it isn't just millennials who like to feel appreciated, it's everyone; 2) employee appreciation programs have been around since far before anyone who fits into the 'millennial' demographic was born, and; 3) even if it was just a millennial issue, most organizations in hospitality are hiring millennials, after all, where else are hotels recruiting their next workforce generation? Read on...

Show Per Page
1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 17
Coming up in August 2019...

Food & Beverage: Millennial Chefs Lead the Way

Led by Millennial chefs, hotels continue to foster sustainability, sourcing and wellness within their dining rooms and banquet spaces, and by all measures, this is responsible for an increase in their revenues. In many hotels, the food & beverage division contributes 50 per cent or more to hotel sales and they are currently experiencing double-digit growth. As a result, hotel owners are allocating an increasing amount of square footage for F&B operations. The biggest area of investment is in catering, which is thriving due to weddings, social events and business conferences. Hotels are also investing in on-site market or convenience stores that offer fresh/refrigerated foods, and buffet concepts also continue to expand. Other popular food trends include a rise of fermented offerings such as kombucha, kimchi, sauerkraut, tempeh, kefir and pickles - all to produce the least processed food possible, and to boost probiotics to improve the immune system. Tea is also enjoying something of a renaissance. More people are thinking of tea with the same reverence as coffee due to its many varieties, applications and benefits. Craft tea blending, nitro tea on tap and even tea cocktails are beginning to appear on some hotel menus. Another trend concerns creating a unique, individualized and memorable experience for guests. This could be a small consumable item that is specific to a property or event, such as house-made snack mixes, gourmet popcorn, macaroons, or jars of house-made jams, chutneys, and mustards -all produced and customized in house. One staple that is in decline is the in-room minibar which seems to have fallen out of favor. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document the trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.