Setting the Stage for the Technology-Infused Hotel Experience

By Randa Tukan Senior Vice Principal & Director of Interiors, HOK | January 28, 2018

Many hotels and hotel brands are creating smartphone apps to help guests manage their experiences while on the property. Yet according to the J.D. Power 2017 North America Hotel Guest Satisfaction Index study, the use of mobile technology is not growing as quickly as expected. The percentage of guests using mobile apps to place online reservations rose by only 11 percent from 2014 (14 percent) to 2017 (25 percent). Only 19 percent of all guests downloaded the hotel brand's mobile app, and 70 percent of these people were reward members.

Does this slow rate of adoption signify a lack of brand loyalty? Or does it reflect the limited amount of app storage space available on mobile devices? After all, travel-related apps are competing for valuable space on our smartphones. Travelers are using all the apps required to continue conducting their business as usual while they are away in addition to those needed for their transportation, entertainment and financial services.. To stand out in this crowd, hotels need to create apps with features that are undeniably essential for enhancing the guest experience. This is no small feat, as apps, can easily become deemed irrelevant and risk deletion.

There is some debate in the hospitality industry around whether the front desk staff and concierge role could actually be replaced by apps. Many insist that hospitality intrinsically remains a service industry, and that maintaining the human connection will always be key to creating positive and meaningful guest experiences.

To make this determination about the future of mobile technology, we first must consider the entire spectrum of the guest experience. This experience can be divided into two specific categories: needs and wants.

The Needs

"Needs" are the more tactical requirements of the guest experience. These include actions like checking in, checking out, adjusting room temperature, wake-up calls, view, type of room, requesting a different pillow or gaining advance knowledge about local food options. Guests often try to emulate their daily in-home conveniences at the hotel.

/ SLIDES
Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Nicole Adair
Carlo Cisco
Todd Goldian
Patrick Ahler
Nigel Cossey
Brett Byers
Lisa Cain
Randa Tukan
Mary Gendron
Coming up in December 2018...

Hotel Law: New Administration - New Policies

In a business as large as a hotel and in a field as broad as the law, there are innumerable legal issues which affect every area of a hotel's operation. For a hotel, the primary legal focus includes their restaurant, bar, meeting, convention and spa areas of their business, as well as employee relations. Hotels are also expected to protect their guests from criminal harm and to ensure the confidentiality of their personal identity information. These are a few of the daily legal matters hotels are concerned with, but on a national scale, there are also a number of pressing issues that the industry at large must address. For example, with a new presidential administration, there could be new policies on minimum wage and overtime rules, and a revised standard for determining joint employer status. There could also be legal issues surrounding new immigration policies like the H-2B guest-worker program (used by some hotels and resorts for seasonal staffing), as well as the uncertain legal status of some employees who fall under the DACA program. There are also major legal implications surrounding the online gaming industry. With the growing popularity of internet gambling and daily fantasy sports betting, more traditional resort casinos are also seeking the legal right to offer online gambling. Finally, the legal status of home-sharing companies like Airbnb continues to make news. Local jurisdictions are still trying to determine how to regulate the short-term apartment rental market, and the outcome will have consequences for the hotel industry. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.