InterContinental® Los Angeles Downtown Shoots for the Stars During the Supermoon

Tallest Building West of Chicago Serves as the Set for Series of "Human Flights"

USA, Los Angeles, California. April 03, 2019

On March 20, InterContinental®Los Angeles Downtown and the Red Bull Air Force welcomed the vernal (spring) equinox with multiple "human flights" during the rise of the last supermoon of the decade.

Connected by a mutual mission to push boundaries beyond the limits, the luxury hotel and action sports brand banded together to give Downtown Los Angeles a never-seen-before spectacle. This event marked the first ever wingsuit jump into downtown Los Angeles. The alignment of the supermoon and spring equinox is also a first for this millennium - as the last time this took place was in 1981.

Donning wingsuits (special jumpsuits that shape the human body into an airfoil, creating lift and with it, "human flight") the Red Bull Air Force leapt from a helicopter 4,000 feet above Los Angeles and traveled one mile into downtown, buzzing by InterContinental Los AngelesDowntown at 120 mph, to land on the street below. The suits, which appear similar to a flying squirrel, were fitted with LED lights and sparking pyrotechnics that lit up the sky.

"We are honored to be approached by a global brand such as Red Bull to bring this moment to life," commented Niles Harris, General Manager of InterContinental Los Angeles Downtown. "When we opened InterContinental Los Angeles Downtown, we had an ambitious goal to change the skyline of the city as well as attract travelers to the new vitality of Downtown."

InterContinental® Los Angeles Downtown, located at 900 Wilshire Boulevard, is owned by Hanjin International Corporation and managed by IHG®. InterContinental Hotels & Resorts is part of IHG's diverse family of brands in nearly 100 countries and territories. With over 70 years of experience, InterContinental® Hotels & Resorts is known for pioneering innovation in the luxury segment and has been trailblazing luxury travel since 1949. The scale and diversity of IHG's brand portfolio means that its hotels can meet guests' needs whatever the occasion - whether an overnight getaway, a business trip, a family celebration, or a once-in-a-lifetime experience.


Credit: Keith Ladzinski
Credit: Andy Farrington
/ SLIDES

About InterContinental Los Angeles Downtown

Media Contact:

Ally Brayton
Publicist
J Public Relations
T: 310-722-7066
E: ihgla@jpublicrelations.com
W: http://www.jpublicrelations.com

Subscribe to our newsletter
for more Hotel Newswire articles

Related News

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close
Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.