Marriott International Signs With Larco to Debut the W Hotels Brand in Toronto Following $40M Transformation

USA, Bethesda, Maryland. October 28, 2019

Marriott International, Inc. (NASDAQ: MAR) has signed an agreement with Larco to bring W Hotels' bold design, signature Whatever/Whenever® service and innovative programming to Toronto for the first time, underscoring growing demand for luxury in Canada and the brand's boundary-breaking approach to design.

The 9-story, 255-room property located at 90 Bloor Street East in Toronto's fashionable Yorkville neighbourhood, will be surrounded by high-end boutiques, galleries and design studios as well as chic cafes, polished bars and fine-dining restaurants. The property is undergoing a $40 million design transformation to the property's guest rooms, restaurants and amenities. The property is expected to open as W Toronto in Summer 2020.

"We are applying a unique, vibrant sensibility to the upcoming W Toronto, one that has not been seen before in Toronto," said Paul Cahill, Area Vice President, Eastern Canada for Marriott International. "The exciting evolution of this property into Toronto's first W hotel is consistent with the ongoing evolution of this Toronto neighbourhood whose vibrancy, sophistication, and density continues to grow. This is a strategic location for the brand, and we foresee it welcoming international business and leisure travellers, but also becoming a destination for urban thrill-seekers."

W Toronto will redefine modern luxury in Toronto, taking inspiration from social, historical and physical insights and embedding elements of each into the rooms and public spaces. Upon entering the hotel, guests will be immersed in a modern biophilia and laboratory style experience, that leads to breath-taking indoor/outdoor spaces, perfect for soaking in spectacular sunsets and sounds.

When it opens, W Toronto is expected to feature multiple food and beverage venues including: an indoor/outdoor lobby bar and lounge equipped with a DJ booth/recording studio for collaborating, broadcasting and recording podcasts; a specialty restaurant and a 9th floor roof top restaurant, accessible from street level with a glass exterior elevator; and a unique coffee and cocktail bar. W Toronto will also feature a 3,300 square foot fitness facility and 4,800 square feet of meeting space to serve as a unique venue for social and corporate events.

W Toronto will embody the brand's signature work hard, play hard philosophy, with FUEL-focused activities (fitness and wellness programming) including weekly workouts, healthy and delicious cuisine and amazing adventures powered by the W brand mantra of DETOX. RETOX. REPEAT.

This signing also underscores Marriott's growing luxury portfolio in Canada, where the company now has 7 open luxury hotels along with additional luxury hotel projects expected to be announced before year-end.

Subscribe to our newsletter
for more Hotel Newswire articles

Related News

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close
Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.