Using Hospitality as a Disguise: Are You Delivering Your Promises?

By Roberta Nedry President & Founder, Hospitality Excellence, Inc. | June 06, 2010

It was a dark, scary night. The wind was howling and the lights were flickering. The hotel sign noted "friendly service" so we ventured in, hoping to find a reassuring face. Our overworked and traveled souls were craving a super comfortable bed and we remembered an ad for this hotel that promised sweet dreams and a relaxing experience. The word "welcome" appeared everywhere. Unfortunately, it was all a disguise to get us in the door. Our hopes for sweet dreams turned to instant nightmares before our heads even hit the bed. Someone had called in sick so one frenzied employee grunted at us from behind the desk. His disposition became more ghoulish and less welcoming with each question we asked. Frustrated, he just assigned us a room that appeared to be tortured by rather than cleaned by housekeeping. The smell of stale smoke filled the air and bed sheets and the mattress seemed a bit haunted with each squeak. We called to complain and were told we would have to speak to the manager about it....in the MORNING!

It sounded good. It looked good. But did it really end up being good? Misleading hospitality messages turn potentially loyal guests into untrusting souls and those who won't come back. And since one bad story usually gets retold 10-20 times, each time with a bit more horror and drama (we all love to exaggerate and tell the bad stories), the long term impact and deterrent marketing can be powerfully disturbing.

As the Halloween season winds down, make sure using disguises is not a year round event relative to service delivery. Consider evaluating if your messages simply lure guests in or if they really deliver what the message promised. When hotels or other organizations promise hospitality on a variety of levels and the guest signs on, excuses and problems are not an option.

When a guest chooses a hotel, they have chosen based on the hospitality promise that the hotel makes. In Conde Naste Traveler's recent Business Traveler Readers' poll (October 2006), the top five things ranked by respondents were: location; comfortable bed; price; security; and SERVICE. How is each of these top five categories being positioned and how are they actually delivered? Have they been disguised or does the real thing show up?

One interesting trend in some hotels is the "outsourcing" of concierge and other services. While potentially advantageous to a hotel's immediate bottom line, the result can be disastrous from a long term guest loyalty and profitability point of view. If an outside source is not seamlessly integrated in the hotel service promise, relationships can turn sour. According to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal (September 8, 2006, by Hannah Karp), this issue is front row and center as some hotels are signing on to save money as competition grows. But, most of the time, the guest does not know as outsourced employees dress in hotel uniforms and of course do not identify that they are actually employed by those other than the hotel. Aha....a disguise!

In this case, the concierge, known for their professionalism and training in delivering ultimate and personalized service, is not really the hotel's concierge yet is THE inside relationship upon which guests depend. Ms. Karp points out that the concierge; a hotel's core position, can indeed make or break a guest's experience. If that's the case, why would a hotel consider presenting a disguise of service by farming duties out to those who may not share the same commitment and understanding of guests? How will other guest service employees refer to these outside resources and will the team work as a whole to present a consistent service delivery standard? And, if loyal guests get disenchanted with this lack of commitment or understanding, does this disguise really save money or instead harm the long term reputation and profitability by creating skeptical and untrusting guests?

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