Setting the Stage for a Spa in the Suite

By Melinda Minton Executive Director, SPAA | October 28, 2008

Turning rooms into havens for spa pleasures is quickly becoming a way to generate additional revenue both within and outside of the immediate realm of your property's spa. Assuming that you are doing everything correctly to drive your spa, the suite is the next untapped and obvious choice to mix things up a bit.

Setting up the Sale

Promoting the spa suite concept is rather easily done but must be comprehensive to include guests, parties, corporate events and local guests simply looking for a new spa excursion. The best way to define your method of attack is to literally org-chart the pathways that lead to the ultimate sale to the guest.

Reservations: It all begins with reservations. Assume the sale and make an important portion of any reservation a trip to the spa. Obviously you can create packages and systems to reinforce this but whatever you do ask about booking spa services when the guest secures a reservation.

Front Desk: Assume the sale again, "and what spa services will you be enjoying during your stay with us?" Allow for colloquial-styled scripts that put staff at ease as well as clients.

Bellman: "While I take care of your luggage may I also book you a spa service?" While this may see far-fetched it is actually a natural way to include the spa in the hotel visit.

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