Avoiding Burnout with Heart Rate Variability Training

By Werner Absenger Chef de Cuisine, Cygnus 27 at Amway Grand Plaza | June 29, 2014

If you read any of my previous articles, you already know that job stress negatively affects just about any division and department of your operation. So in order to tackle the problem of burnout, employee turnover, and increasing health care costs it make sense to teach your employees how to manage stress more effectively, and thus become more resilient to stress.

Today we will explore a little of the science behind Heart Rate Variability (HRV). You will learn how to train your heart to respond better to stress, allowing you to become more resilient to stress.

The Heart

Ever since the dawn of humans, the heart is regarded as a source of emotion, courage, and wisdom. We now have very good evidence that negative emotions bring increased disorder to the heart’s rhythm and the autonomic nervous system (ANS). This wreaks havoc in the rest of the body if left unchecked (McCraty, Atkinson, & Tomasino, 2001).

Positive emotions have been shown to increase harmony and coherence in heart rhythms, balancing the nervous systems. The bottom line for health: Disharmony in the nervous system taxes the entire body because it creates inefficiencies, stressing the heart and other organ systems. Creating harmonious rhythms, on the other hand, leads to efficiency, allowing the body’s systems run optimally (McCraty et al., 2001).

Heart-Rate Variability (HRV)

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Rohit Verma
Lawrence Adams
Gini Dietrich
Tom LaTour
Amy Locke
Eric Rahe
Michael Koethner
Judith Jackson
Simon Hudson
Brenda Fields
Coming up in May 2018...

Eco-Friendly Practices: The Greening of Your Bottom Line

There are strong moral and ethical reasons why a hotel should incorporate eco-friendly practices into their business but it is also becoming abundantly clear that “going green” can dramatically improve a hotel's bottom line. When energy-saving measures are introduced - fluorescent bulbs, ceiling fans, linen cards, lights out cards, motion sensors for all public spaces, and energy management systems - energy bills are substantially reduced. When water-saving equipment is introduced - low-flow showerheads, low-flow toilets, waterless urinals, and serving water only on request in restaurants - water bills are also considerably reduced. Waste hauling is another major expense which can be lowered through recycling efforts and by avoiding wastefully-packaged products. Vendors can be asked to deliver products in minimal wrapping, and to deliver products one day, and pick up the packaging materials the next day - generating substantial savings. In addition, renewable sources of energy (solar, geothermal, wind, etc.) have substantially improved the economics of using alternative energies at the property level. There are other compelling reasons to initiate sustainability practices in their operation. Being green means guests and staff are healthier, which can lead to an increase in staff retention, as well as increased business from health conscious guests. Also, sooner or later, all properties will be sold, and green hotels will command a higher price due to its energy efficiencies. Finally, some hotels qualify for tax credits, subsidies and rebates from local, regional and federal governments for the eco-friendly investments they've made in their hotels. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating sustainable practices into their operations and how their hotels are benefiting from them.