In a Hotel Data Breach, Immediate Response is the New Normal

By Kurt Meister Senior Vice President , Distinguished Programs | April 01, 2018

If you haven’t heard about the latest data breach to hit a major hotel chain, just do a quick internet search. In 2017, the number of U.S. data breaches hit an all-time high of 1,579, up 45 percent from 2016, according to the Identity Theft Resource Center.   And hotels are a prime target. Verizon’s 2017 Data Breach Investigations Report ranks accommodations (hotels and restaurants) as the top industry for point-of-sale (POS) intrusions.

Each data breach creates its own unique set of headaches. One is financial cost. From 2014-17, the average costs of POS-related investigations averaged $735,000 and grew larger (as high as $17 million) based on the size of the organization, according to NetDiligence.  

Reputation damage is equally concerning. Consumers expect hotels – and all businesses – to protect their data no matter what. And when a data breach occurs, they expect immediate action, often faster than the six-to-eight weeks allowed under most U.S. laws.

For many hotels, the question is no longer if a data breach will occur, but when. That’s why hotel owners, operators and franchises must be protected and prepared.

Evaluate Your Risks

Because the U.S. hospitality industry attracts millions of guests each night – and because those customers pay for almost everything with a credit card – cybercriminals see hotels as a potential windfall.

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Coming up in August 2018...

Food & Beverage: Millennials Rule

The Millennial Generation has surpassed the Baby Boomers to become the largest living generation in America, and their tastes and preferences are being reflected in the Food & Beverage industry. In general, Millennials insist on more natural, healthier, less-processed food and beverage sources, and in part, this inspired the farm-to-table movement. However, now the trend is becoming even more pronounced and hyper-local. Millennials no longer simply want to know their food is farm-to-table, they want to know which farm, and where it's located relative to the community. As a result, hotel F&B directors are redesigning entire menus to feature area brewers, wineries, and family farms. Not only is this a proven way to satisfy Millennial tastes but it also opens the door for hotel guests to enjoy immersive experiences such as tours and excursions to local farms and breweries. Also, thanks in no small part to Millennials, coffee consumption is at an all-time high. In response, F&B directors are creating innovative ways to enhance the coffee experience for guests. Nitro-brewed coffee, cold brew, lattes on draft, and the introduction of unique milk options are part of this trend, as are locally sourced coffee beans where available. Millennial influences can also be found in the Craft and Artisan Cocktail movement where the same preferences for locally sourced and high-quality ingredients apply. One leading hotel even offers a drink menu featuring liquors infused with herbs recommended by experts for their health and well-being benefits. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document the trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.