Winner Winner Chicken Dinner

By Bonnie Knutson Professor, The School of Hospitality Business/MSU | April 08, 2018

To begin my workshops or seminars on consumer lifestyle trends, I often give the attendees a thousand dollars (in Monopoly money, of course) and ask everyone what they would do with it.  Would they go out for dinner? Spend it on a weekend getaway?  Get the iPhone X?  Donate it to charity?  Save it?  Or give it to their kids?

What is always interesting to me and to everyone else is that no two people would use the money in exactly the same way.  And there are little, if any, similarities in spending patterns based on age, gender, income, education, travel patterns or any of the other standard demographic criterion that we commonly use to segment our travel markets. 

But aren't demographics how we tend to segment our guests? The older folks want this.  The Baby Boomers, want that.  And the Millennials want – well, some folks think they want everything.  Even gender differences, rooted in the old axioms that men are hunters and women are gatherers, or that men are from Mars and women are from Venus, are blurring when it comes to what drives consumer behavior.  In other words, demographics don't seem to help us effectively understand how to engage (i.e. market to) the traveling public anymore.  They did 20 or 30 years ago, but not anymore.  Those days are over. 

So if demographics aren't the key, what is?

The answer is emotions.

This truism was recently brought front and center in an online report from Brand Keys.   The article points out what marketers instinctively have known for a long time now:  People buy with their heart and justify with their head.  Perhaps noted neurologist Donald Caine said it best:  The essential difference between emotion and reason is that emotion leads to action while reason leads to conclusions."  In other words, it is increasingly being acknowledged that people respond more to emotional marketing than to rational information when deciding what to buy or where to buy it.  Think about memorable Super bowl commercials that moved people throughout the years.  Coca Cola's Mean Joe Green.  Budweiser's Clydesdale Horses.  Or the 2018 Dorito's Blaze commercial with Morgan Freeman.

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Mary Gendron
Kalen Willis
Tina Stehle
Bill Meade
Jane Segerberg
Tammy Farley
Todd Ryan
S. Lakshmi Narasimhan
John Ely
Jason Bramhall VI
Coming up in October 2018...

Revenue Management: Getting it Right

Revenue Management has evolved into an indispensable area of hotel operations, chiefly responsible for setting forecasting and pricing strategies. Because the profession is relatively new to the hotel and hospitality industries, a clear-cut definition of what exactly Hotel Revenue Management is has only recently emerged - Selling the Right Room to the Right Client at the Right Moment at the Right Price on the Right Distribution Channel with the best commission efficiency. Though the profession can be summed up in a single sentence, that doesn't mean it's easy. In fact, it's an incredibly complicated and complex endeavor, relying on mountains of data from a wide range of sources that must be analyzed and interpreted in order to formulate concrete pricing strategies. To accomplish this, Revenue Managers rely on an array of sophisticated technology systems and software tools that generate a multitude of reports that are central to effective decision-making. As valuable as these current technology systems are, much of the information that's collected is based on past historical trends and performance. What's new is the coming of big, data-driven, predictive software and analytics, which is likely to be a game-changer for Revenue Managers. The software has the capacity to analyze all the relevant data and predict occupancy levels and room rates, maximizing hotel profitability in the process. Another new trend that some larger hotel chains are embracing is an emphasis on Booking Direct. For Revenue Managers, this is another new channel with its own sales and costs that have to be figured into the mix. The October issue of the Hotel Business Review will address these developments and document how some leading hotels are executing their revenue management strategies.