MCR Acquires 140-Key SpringHill Suites Fairfax Fair Oaks in Northern Virginia

USA, New York City, New York. July 31, 2018

MCR, the seventh-largest hotel owner-operator in the United States, has acquired the 140-room SpringHill Suites Fairfax Fair Oaks in Northern Virginia, which received a $1.4 million top to bottom renovation last year.

Just 20 minutes from Dulles International Airport (IAD), Fairfax, Virginia offers something for everyone in the family. See the first supersonic airliner, a Concorde jet, at the nearby Smithsonian Air & Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, learn how George Washington made whiskey in 1799 at Mount Vernon's working distillery and ride Cannonball Slides at SplashDown Waterpark.


When business calls, the SpringHill Suites Fairfax Fair Oaks is close to Northrop Grumman, General Dynamics, Boeing, the National Reconnaissance Office and other corporate headquarters.


“Everyone should visit Fairfax,” says Tyler Morse, CEO and Managing Partner of MCR. “Historical sites, wineries, golf courses and the Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts make it the perfect getaway. In August, we look forward to welcoming family members of George Mason University's 36,000 returning students.”


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Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.