A New Brand of Prestige Condiments Has Been Launched to Target a Gap in the Market for Upscale Products

USA, Miami, Florida. November 12, 2020

Le Must is the premier luxury condiment brand of choice to five-star hotels and prestige venues around the world. The collection is single-portioned and organic.

Combining classic culinary techniques with a contemporary enthusiasm for innovation, the maîtres artisans of Le Must craft all-natural and organic balanced blends of condiments, produced in small batches, to deliver a taste and texture that seek to set the brand apart.

The uniquely shaped signature presentation of Le Must's signature curved glass bottles promises to make fine dining and in-room dining a memorable experience.

The range includes Chef's Classic Ketchup, Artisan's Mayonnaise, Gourmet Yellow Mustard, and Authentic Dijon Mustard.

Le Must founder Moshe Cohen, whose career has been focused on propelling luxury brands globally: "Throughout this exciting journey, I realized that an important category in food service is void of any serious luxury alternative: condiments. I always felt there had to be a better solution for luxury hospitality. I could not find one, so I created it."

The brand has taken off quickly, and Le Must condiments are now served at such select properties of the Waldorf Astoria, Park Hyatt, Four Seasons, Ritz Carlton, Conrad, JW Marriott, Loews, Montage, Pendry, Nobu, and Soho House.

Le Must condiments are also featured on Celebrity Cruises and onboard over 150 private jets in the US and Caribbean.

In this post-Covid 19 industry reality, with resorts, hotels and restaurants long marketed for their personal touches, Cohen says the industry is quickly forced to redefine itself as "no-touch at all" when it comes to guest exposure to surfaces and objects potentially infected with Covid-19. As hotels and restaurants are gradually reopening across the States, respective Departments of Public Health are calling for the removal or reduction of common touchpoints, and suspended use of all shared food items. Gone will be the familiar salt and pepper shakers and multi-use condiment bottles that have been imprinted upon the dining experience.

The California Department of Public Health, in its recently published COVID-19 Industry Guidance for Dine-In Restaurants, recommends for these foods to be provided in single serve containers whenever possible. "In this dining out in the age of Coronavirus, single-serve condiments are poised to become the adopted industry standard in food service" says Cohen.

For more information, please visit lemust.com and email info@lemust.com


Le Must Single Serve Organic Condiments for 5 Star Hotels and Resorts
/ SLIDES

About Le Must

Media Contact:

Moshe Cohen
General Manager
Le Must
T: +1 786-338-1019
E: info@lemust.com
W: http://www.lemust.com

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