Selecting the Products for the Hotel Pantry: Five Points to Consider

By Janine Roberts Director of Sales and Marketing, Tradavo | August 03, 2010

The pantry is a welcome amenity that meets the needs of your guests when they are in a pinch for a light snack, quick meal or convenient headache reliever. This popular hotel retail offering has become a brand standard for many hotel brands including Marriott International's highly successful "The Market" and Hilton's well planned "Pantry Pavilion" and "Suite Shop." These pantries, though often very small, bring in a substantial source of revenue when properly supplied and managed.

But how does a manager choose what products and categories to offer in the pantry to meet the guests' needs and earn a profit that makes the offering worthwhile? It is not as difficult as one might think so long as you keep a few important points in mind when sitting down to plan your hotel pantry assortment.
Whenever possible, start with your brand's recommended planograms to plan your pantry assortment. Both Hilton and Marriott brands have a well defined planogram of recommended categories that include the core pantry necessities: Sweet Snacks, Salty Snacks, Healthy Snacks, Quick Meals, Ice Cream, Frozen Dinners, and Travel Size Amenities. Within each category, they also recommend top selling products like Snickers candy bars for the Sweet Snacks group and Doritos for the Salty Snacks – best sellers in any market regardless of region or demographic.

These planograms are rarely based on personal preferences of the F&B or Retail team. They are, in most cases, carefully developed recommendation based on market research and taking several important areas into consideration including:

  • national best sellers from each major manufacturer like Mars, Nestle and Frito Lay
  • the quality level that best supports the brand image (premium, standard or economy)
  • a desire to offer a variety of categories and products that effectively meet the majority of guest needs regardless of region or demographic.

However, if you do not have a national pantry program that offers standards and guidelines, then be sure to follow the basic concepts that all major planograms are based upon.

1) Stick With What You Know...

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