Mini Hotel Gardens and Specialized Landscaping

By Ken Hutcheson President, U.S. Lawns | July 06, 2014

In the ever growing hospitality industry, first impressions are critical for establishing and maintaining a competitive edge. Each property has its own unique twists and turns that can be used to create an appealing look and feel for the property. Not only can a beautiful garden showcase your property, but it can also be a simple and cost-effective way to differentiate your hotel from the competition.

Careful selection of plant varieties and regular maintenance can help keep the landscape within budget while still showing the hotel's property in its best light. The landscape can create a sense of peace and tranquility, awe, surprise, or even excitement. Whether you want to create small, intimate spaces, highlight a particular feature, or maximize a difficult-to-tame sloping property, every landscape can be used to create an attract space that transports guests to a different place.

Add a Small English Garden

Depending on the overall theme of your property, consider turning all or part of your property into a small garden areas. You can create one large garden with small nooks and crannies or turn only part of the property into a small, intimate space. Creating small gardens can provide guests with a place for quiet contemplation and relaxation.

There are many ways you can create small gardens on your property, and a landscape contractor would be able to help provide direction for what might work best for your property. A popular choice to consider is an English garden, as they are very versatile and can thrive almost anywhere. These types of gardens have become quite popular due to their charm and tranquility as well as the "natural" feeling they can evoke. A small English garden added to the property might include features such as shrubberies along a graveled or mulched walkway, tree plantations to satisfy botanical curiosity, and, most notably, the return of flowers in skirts of sweeping planted beds.

The first thing you want to do is select a few main colors to create continuity within the garden. Annuals allow you the option of trying new colors each year, as well as the chance to keep the colors continuous. If you want to create contrast, then use perennial blooms of opposing colors. You can achieve variety by using a number of different shades of the main color components. The more traditional flowers used in these types of gardens are roses, delphiniums, and foxglove; however there are many others you can use instead. Some others that are also used frequently are pink dianthus, pansies, and violas, but do not feel restricted to just these options. If you want to use more native plants, or have a particular color or style in mind, your landscape contractor can help make suggestions for what will work best for your property.

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