Building Loyalty with Intergenerational Spa and Wellness Programs

By Mia A. Mackman President & Owner, Mackman ES | August 27, 2017

Growth in travel and tourism continues to rise in conjunction with intergenerational lifestyles, shifting values and increasing wellness keynotes. Every generation has unique preferences and imperatives that set them apart and stick. Accounting for nearly half of the population, Millennials and Generation Z have considerable weight in the market share. This article examines perceived values vs. core values and the benefits of incorporating a multi-generational, multi-faceted approach to spa and wellness programming to enhance customer spend and loyalty.

Generational Overlay

The structure of the family unit has dramatically changed over the years. This has inevitably impacted families, day-to-day living, tourism and travel. The Pew Research Center reported "a record 60.6 million Americans live in multigenerational households." (Figure 1) This averages to "nearly one-in-five Americans" that are living in a diverse family environment with a multigenerational overlay.

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Generation X and Millennials are the "bridge markets" between the aging Baby Boomer population and the radically different mindset of Generation Z. The Millennial market has been the most studied, documented and #selfie-chronicled generation of all time. Whereas many seek to understand the mentality and profile the millennials up close, most forget they are yet, a part of the bridge connecting the choices made today to the behaviors and preferences of the future.

Unlike the generations before them, Millennials and Gen X are immersed in modern-day parenting. They face higher demands on time, financial uncertainty and chronic social, political and lifestyle changes. They are also the first generations to raise children in a highly digital age alongside a constant interface with the internet. Despite the challenges of parenting and striving towards well-being and work-life balance, their dedication to multi-task, care-take and provide for their aging parents is stronger than ever.

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Coming up in November 2018...

Architecture & Design: Expecting the Unexpected

There are more than 700,000 hotels and resorts worldwide and the hotel industry is continually looking for new ways to differentiate its properties. In some cases, hotels themselves have become travel destinations and guests have come to expect the unexpected - to experience the touches that make the property unlike any other place in the world. To achieve this, architects and designers are adopting a variety of strategies to meet the needs of every type of guest and to provide incomparable customer experiences. One such strategy is site-integration - the effort to skillfully marry a hotel to its immediate surroundings. The goal is to honor the cultural location of the property, and to integrate that into the hotel's design - both inside and out. Constructing low-impact structures that blend in with the environment and incorporating local natural elements into the design are essential to this endeavor. Similarly, there is an ongoing effort to blur the lines between interior and exterior spaces - to pull the outside in - to enable guests to connect with nature and enjoy beautiful, harmonious surroundings at all times. Another design trend is personalization - taking the opportunity to make every space within the hotel original and unique. The days of matching decor and furniture in every room are gone; instead, designers are utilizing unexpected textures, mix-and-match furniture, diverse wall treatments and tiles - all to create a more personalized and fresh experience for the guest. Finally, lobbies are continuing to evolve. They are being transformed from cold, impersonal, business-like spaces into warm, inviting, living room-like spaces, meant to provide comfort and to encourage social interaction. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.