How to Scale Your Marketing Team by Working With Freelancers

By Sherry Heyl Founder & Consultant, Amplified Concepts | April 29, 2018

57.3 million people freelanced in 2017 according to the report Freelancing in America. At its current growth rate, the majority of the U.S. workforce will be freelancers by 2027.

I remember a time when the joke was that "consultant" or "freelancer" was another word for unemployed. Today freelancing has become a respected career choice that allows for freedom and flexibility which is now possible thanks to advancements in technology. Freelancers are able to work with multiple clients on projects small and large from their home office or really anywhere in the world that has an Internet connection. Freelancing is no longer about taking on contract assignments in between full-time jobs. In fact, more than half of the freelancers recently surveyed said they would not accept a full-time job no matter how much they were offered.

The virtual work arrangement also benefits companies hiring freelancers as they are able to seek out the best talent for the project without regard to location. As a freelancer, I have worked with a number of clients I have never met in person and a few outside of the United States. I build my team of freelancers based on skill set and personality fit without regard to location. most of my projects are managed on secure cloud-based software and I conduct meetings through video chats. By not being restricted by location to who I can work with I am able to build teams that are the perfect fit for each project and work with clients all over the world.

With a growing amount of professional talent available there are several benefits that come with hiring freelancers to scale your marketing team.

Reasons to Hire Freelancers

  • Expertise and Experience
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Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.