How to Scale Your Marketing Team by Working With Freelancers

By Sherry Heyl Founder & Consultant, Amplified Concepts | April 29, 2018

57.3 million people freelanced in 2017 according to the report Freelancing in America. At its current growth rate, the majority of the U.S. workforce will be freelancers by 2027.

I remember a time when the joke was that "consultant" or "freelancer" was another word for unemployed. Today freelancing has become a respected career choice that allows for freedom and flexibility which is now possible thanks to advancements in technology. Freelancers are able to work with multiple clients on projects small and large from their home office or really anywhere in the world that has an Internet connection. Freelancing is no longer about taking on contract assignments in between full-time jobs. In fact, more than half of the freelancers recently surveyed said they would not accept a full-time job no matter how much they were offered.

The virtual work arrangement also benefits companies hiring freelancers as they are able to seek out the best talent for the project without regard to location. As a freelancer, I have worked with a number of clients I have never met in person and a few outside of the United States. I build my team of freelancers based on skill set and personality fit without regard to location. most of my projects are managed on secure cloud-based software and I conduct meetings through video chats. By not being restricted by location to who I can work with I am able to build teams that are the perfect fit for each project and work with clients all over the world.

With a growing amount of professional talent available there are several benefits that come with hiring freelancers to scale your marketing team.

Reasons to Hire Freelancers

  • Expertise and Experience
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Hotel Law: New Administration - New Policies

In a business as large as a hotel and in a field as broad as the law, there are innumerable legal issues which affect every area of a hotel's operation. For a hotel, the primary legal focus includes their restaurant, bar, meeting, convention and spa areas of their business, as well as employee relations. Hotels are also expected to protect their guests from criminal harm and to ensure the confidentiality of their personal identity information. These are a few of the daily legal matters hotels are concerned with, but on a national scale, there are also a number of pressing issues that the industry at large must address. For example, with a new presidential administration, there could be new policies on minimum wage and overtime rules, and a revised standard for determining joint employer status. There could also be legal issues surrounding new immigration policies like the H-2B guest-worker program (used by some hotels and resorts for seasonal staffing), as well as the uncertain legal status of some employees who fall under the DACA program. There are also major legal implications surrounding the online gaming industry. With the growing popularity of internet gambling and daily fantasy sports betting, more traditional resort casinos are also seeking the legal right to offer online gambling. Finally, the legal status of home-sharing companies like Airbnb continues to make news. Local jurisdictions are still trying to determine how to regulate the short-term apartment rental market, and the outcome will have consequences for the hotel industry. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.