How to Scale Your Marketing Team by Working With Freelancers

By Sherry Heyl Founder & Consultant, Amplified Concepts | April 29, 2018

57.3 million people freelanced in 2017 according to the report Freelancing in America. At its current growth rate, the majority of the U.S. workforce will be freelancers by 2027.

I remember a time when the joke was that "consultant" or "freelancer" was another word for unemployed. Today freelancing has become a respected career choice that allows for freedom and flexibility which is now possible thanks to advancements in technology. Freelancers are able to work with multiple clients on projects small and large from their home office or really anywhere in the world that has an Internet connection. Freelancing is no longer about taking on contract assignments in between full-time jobs. In fact, more than half of the freelancers recently surveyed said they would not accept a full-time job no matter how much they were offered.

The virtual work arrangement also benefits companies hiring freelancers as they are able to seek out the best talent for the project without regard to location. As a freelancer, I have worked with a number of clients I have never met in person and a few outside of the United States. I build my team of freelancers based on skill set and personality fit without regard to location. most of my projects are managed on secure cloud-based software and I conduct meetings through video chats. By not being restricted by location to who I can work with I am able to build teams that are the perfect fit for each project and work with clients all over the world.

With a growing amount of professional talent available there are several benefits that come with hiring freelancers to scale your marketing team.

Reasons to Hire Freelancers

  • Expertise and Experience
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Coming up in October 2018...

Revenue Management: Getting it Right

Revenue Management has evolved into an indispensable area of hotel operations, chiefly responsible for setting forecasting and pricing strategies. Because the profession is relatively new to the hotel and hospitality industries, a clear-cut definition of what exactly Hotel Revenue Management is has only recently emerged - Selling the Right Room to the Right Client at the Right Moment at the Right Price on the Right Distribution Channel with the best commission efficiency. Though the profession can be summed up in a single sentence, that doesn't mean it's easy. In fact, it's an incredibly complicated and complex endeavor, relying on mountains of data from a wide range of sources that must be analyzed and interpreted in order to formulate concrete pricing strategies. To accomplish this, Revenue Managers rely on an array of sophisticated technology systems and software tools that generate a multitude of reports that are central to effective decision-making. As valuable as these current technology systems are, much of the information that's collected is based on past historical trends and performance. What's new is the coming of big, data-driven, predictive software and analytics, which is likely to be a game-changer for Revenue Managers. The software has the capacity to analyze all the relevant data and predict occupancy levels and room rates, maximizing hotel profitability in the process. Another new trend that some larger hotel chains are embracing is an emphasis on Booking Direct. For Revenue Managers, this is another new channel with its own sales and costs that have to be figured into the mix. The October issue of the Hotel Business Review will address these developments and document how some leading hotels are executing their revenue management strategies.