Vesta Hospitality Acquires Cannery Pier Hotel & Spa, A Luxury Independent Property in Astoria, Oregon

USA, Vancouver, Washington. October 08, 2019

Vesta Hospitality announced today that it has acquired Cannery Pier Hotel & Spa, an independent luxury boutique property on Astoria, Oregon's Columbia River Basin. The announcement was made by Vesta Hospitality Chairman & CEO Rick Takach.

Built on the site of the former Union Fish Cannery, the Cannery Pier Hotel & Spa projects 600 feet into the Columbia River, offering guests unparalleled views of a real working river, as well as views of Cape Disappointment Lighthouse and nearby Washington. Each room has a private balcony and is lavishly appointed with a fireplace, hardwood floors and luxurious amenities.

Opened in 2005, the late Robert "Jake" Jacob spent more than a decade in the planning, permitting and development of the Cannery Pier Hotel & Spa, respecting the features and history of the site, prominent in Astoria's commercial maritime history, while endowing the hotel and spa as a singular luxury destination.

"The Jacob family was an outstanding owner and operator of this exceptional property. We are extremely proud to be the new stewards of what is a truly irreplaceable property at a location that holds a special place in this region and community's history and imagination," said Vesta Hospitality Chairman and CEO Rick Takach, "Any property improvements that we make will preserve its existing character, while Vesta teams will work to enhance the total guest experience."

Consistently earning high marks from travel publications and hotel review sites, the property also features a full-service Day Spa with authentic Finnish sauna and fitness room; as well as a complimentary chauffeur driven classic automobile and complimentary day-use bicycles. Meeting space includes the Chinook Boardroom and the Union Fish Meeting Room, which can seat up to 70 people theatre style. Seated banquet facilities accommodate up to 60 people. Cannery Pier Hotel & Spa is also just a few steps from The Loft at the Red Building, which houses the highly acclaimed Bridgewater Bistro and also offers 4,000 square feet of event and meeting space. Nearby are the Columbia River Maritime Museum, the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, local theater, microbrew pubs, biking trails and many other attractions. For more information, please visit: https://www.cannerypierhotel.com.


Cannery Pier Hotel & Spa
/ SLIDES

About Vesta Hospitality

Media Contact:

Paul Kesman
PR Spokesperson
Vesta Hospitality
T: 248-321-2035
E: pkesman@pdkpr.com
W: http://www.vestahospitality.com

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