Cabot Appoints Simon Cooper as Special Advisor

Canada, Toronto, Ontario. June 08, 2020

Cabot, the developer and operator of master-planned golf resort communities, announced today that accomplished travel industry expert, Simon Cooper, has joined the executive team as Special Advisor.

In this role, Cooper will support global team and property development and international expansion. Cabot is currently expanding its portfolio from Nova Scotia to Saint Lucia and is assessing future growth opportunities across the globe. Construction is underway for the next phase at the acclaimed Cabot Cape Breton resort, including a collection of new residences, a short course, putting course, clubhouse and health and wellness center. The second project from the brand, Cabot Saint Lucia, is currently in development on the northern tip of Saint Lucia. Situated along one and a half miles of breathtaking coastline, the property will be home to a residential community with world-class amenities and a boutique resort anchored by a golf club with a masterful Coore & Crenshaw course.

"We are thrilled to have Simon join the Cabot team. His enthusiasm, impressive background and hospitality achievements will undoubtedly further the success of our growing brand," said Ben Cowan-Dewar, CEO and Co-founder of Cabot.

Cooper joins Cabot with more than forty years of hospitality experience. He is widely known as an influential leader following successful executive roles with some of the top hotel brands in the world including Marriott Hotels & Resorts, The Ritz Carlton Hotel Company, Delta Hotels & Resorts, OMNI Hotels USA and Canadian Pacific Hotels & Resorts.

Most recently, Cooper has been consulting to share his hospitality knowledge and experience through Simon Cooper & Associates. He currently serves on the Board of Directors for Benchmark Hotels and is a lead consultant for Gencom and the ownership entity of Peninsula Papagayo in Costa Rica.

Cooper earned an MBA from the University of Toronto and received an Honorary Doctor of Laws from Guelph University. Born in England, but a citizen of Canada, Mr. Cooper divides his time between the Eastern Shore of Maryland and his home in the Luberon Valley in Provence.



/ SLIDES

About Cabot

Media Contact:

Rachel Maher
Founder
REM Public Relations
T: 310-497-6856
E: rachel@rempublicrelations.com
W: http://www.rempublicrelations.com

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