FreshAir Announces Unique and Highly Effective Smoking Detection System for Hotels

Freshair1 Monitors For, Detects, and Proves Tobacco Smoking and Marijuana Smoking

USA, Lebanon, New Hampshire. June 22, 2020

FreshAir, an industry leader in the development of sensors to detect and alert for hazardous chemicals, announces its unique and highly effective FreshAir1 Smoking Detection System. The FreshAir system is ideally suited for use in hotels, casinos, and other hospitality industry settings. The only technology available to monitor for, immediately detect, and prove tobacco smoking and marijuana smoking, FreshAir1 Smoking Detection Systems are ideal for enforcing no-smoking policies, protecting infrastructure investments, securing cleaning fees, and avoiding chargebacks.

Unlike typical smoke detectors which use light or radiation to detect general particles (dust, smoke, steam, etc.), FreshAir sensors are capable of detecting specific molecules in tobacco smoke and marijuana smoke. What's more, the molecularly imprinted polymer that forms the sensor resets following smoking detection, thus enabling continued monitoring without additional upkeep.

Widely deployed in industry-leading hotels and casinos, FreshAir1 devices, with their patented PolySens® technology, detect and prove smoking in unauthorized areas. These tamper-proof devices and cloud-based monitoring platform are designed to prevent typical efforts to defeat detection, helping to protect no-smoking areas in real time.

FreshAir's detection devices are easy to install; they plug into outlets and are secured with tamper-proof screws. The WiFi-enabled detection devices connect to building networks to communicate 24/7 with FreshAir's monitoring platform. Each device in a FreshAir1 system is capable of monitoring up to 500 square feet of open space.

When smoking is detected in a monitored space, FreshAir sends users an immediate alert via email, computer desktop, and/or mobile phone push notification. Smoking alerts come with timestamped reports of the incident in the monitored space, providing the scientific proof needed to enforce no-smoking policies. FreshAir's Mobile App and online portal allow facilities teams to access alert history, stay updated on device information, and log additional evidence of smoking to be archived in the account's alert history.

For more information on FreshAir, please visit: https://www.freshairsensor.com /.



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About FreshAir

Media Contact:

Kristin Nugent
Account Suprevisor
FreshAir
T: 617-367-0100
E: kristin.nugent@mgr1.com
W: http://www.mcneilgrayandrice.com

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