Food & Beverage: Five Hot Trends in the Meetings Industry

By Andy Dolce Founder, Chairman & Managing Partner, Dolce International | February 20, 2010

While food trends may come and go, meeting planners always need to feed their attendees. With travelers' tastes expanding to more global flavors, today's successful meeting hotels must go above and beyond the typical banquet fare to wow today's finicky groups.

While traditional fare is still in vogue in some markets, hoteliers must keep abreast of culinary trends and changing palates. Did you know that some popular themed dinner buffets at the moment include Thai, Indian, Latin and Caribbean accented meals? Anything spicy, ethnic, bold or organic is sure to create a stir among attendees these days.

As hospitality leaders, we have a responsibility to address health and nutrition concerns of our guests. In addition, we need to ensure that we are purchasing items from local vendors when possible and selecting items such as organic meats and sustainable fish.

Aside from providing sustenance, culinary experiences for groups can be great team-building activities in both "Top Chef" and "Survivor" scenarios. The value of bonding over a home cooked meal cannot be underestimated. Read on to learn about five hot food and beverage trends in the meetings industry.

1) Broadening Our Horizons - The Most Requested Ethnic Meals

For meeting organizers, planning a meal that appeals to the exotic and ethnic tastes of attendees is growing in popularity. Planners are now inquiring about Indian-fusion and Japanese cuisine, while the more adventurous are pursuing Korean and African foods. In addition, interest in flavors from North Africa like couscous is spreading across the country and Olympic hype from Beijing will surely boost cravings for Chinese food. At Dolce International, our chefs are using many imported items such as Moroccan harissa, Thai curry sauce from Hong Kong, Malaysian tamarind, imported Truffles from France, lemongrass oil, fish sauce from Vietnam, and 100 year old balsamic aged vinegar from Tuscany.

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