Building Loyalty by Personalizing the Guest Experience

By Michael DiLeva Executive Vice President, The IDT Group | January 27, 2012

While that's understandable, what's disappointing is that all too often, the shallow implementation of such concepts leaves us working for the concept itself as opposed to the concept working for us. We become mired in the jargon, the mechanisms and the processes. The concept becomes the end itself, as opposed to simply the means to the end and we lose touch with what should be the business goals.

Customer Relationship Marketing (CRM) is a great example. Unlike other popular business concepts that emerged from best-selling books or landmark academic research, CRM more or less evolved from a long line of existing initiatives. It predominantly grew out of database marketing in the early 1980's, most notably with American Airlines' introduction of the landmark AAdvantage frequent flyer program (which ironically itself was somewhat of an evolution of the cultural phenomenon that was S&H Green Stamps) and was quickly followed in the hospitality industry just a few years later by Holiday Inn and Marriott.

CRM originally emerged with the noble goal of increasing revenues and margins by creating customer loyalty. And the path by which to achieve those goals involved the gathering of more information on customer activities and the creation of incentives - such as points or miles - to encourage the customer to increase or consolidate their activity with the provider. Today, some 25 years after its first introduction, CRM unfortunately hasn't evolved all that much and therein lies the problem.

At its core, CRM remains software centric and is hindered by its predominantly internal focus and transactional mindset. Despite incredible advances in information gathering and business intelligence that has revealed amazing information about customers, such information is usually only used by the staff-level, back-of-house marketing and finance teams. Little, if any information ever trickles down to the line level to allow the customer-facing associate to use it to meaningfully impact the guest experience. Even in the one operational area where CRM has made a difference - the Call Center - it's only used for service recovery and up-selling. And from the customer's perspective, the only value that they're receiving from CRM is points. Loyalty - which was the goal from the beginning - isn't achieved through an emotional connection, but is instead simply "bought" (or in reality "rented" since there's little to keep the customer from defecting) via the exchange of points for purchases.

It's because of those weaknesses that CRM is falling out of favor to a certain extent and many service providers are beginning to tout the emerging concept of "Customer Experience Management." Academically, the definition of Customer Experience Management isn't all that much different than that of CRM. Both are involved in managing the interaction with the customer across a number of channels and ideally at every point of contact. Where CEM really differs from CRM and why it should have a particular appeal for hospitality operators is that CEM at its core focuses on "meeting" customer needs as opposed to CRM which focuses more on "exploiting" those needs.

The differences are far from simply semantics and with the proper execution the results can be more than subtle. At its core, CES takes advantage of the fact that points don't make a difference (in fact, they're almost ubiquitous - do you know any airline or hotel company that doesn't have one?), and leverages the philosophy that loyalty can't be bought, but it can be earned via product differentiation. CES is the evolution of CRM as it focuses not on delivering a beneficial and meaningful impact to the transaction, but instead positively impacting and influencing the actual overall shopping or utilization experience itself. And just like the early adopters in the first wave of CRM implementation drove substantial results, the companies that take the lead in introducing CES to impact the guest experience will find themselves with a true competitive advantage.

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Ashish Gambhir
Steve Kiesner
Amy Locke
Steven D. Weber
Frank Meek
Pete Pearson
Nitin Shah
Trevor Stuart-Hill
Janine Roberts
Bruce Tracey
Coming up in June 2019...

Sales & Marketing: Selling Experiences

There are innumerable strategies that Hotel Sales and Marketing Directors employ to find, engage and entice guests to their property, and those strategies are constantly evolving. A breakthrough technology, pioneering platform, or even a simple algorithm update can cause new trends to emerge and upend the best laid plans. Sales and marketing departments must remain agile so they can adapt to the ever changing digital landscape. As an example, the popularity of virtual reality is on the rise, as 360 interactive technologies become more mainstream. Chatbots and artificial intelligence are also poised to become the next big things, as they take guest personalization to a whole new level. But one sales and marketing trend that is currently resulting in major benefits for hotels is experiential marketing - the effort to deliver an experience to potential guests. Mainly this is accomplished through the creative use of video and images, and by utilizing what has become known as User Generated Content. By sharing actual personal content (videos and pictures) from satisfied guests who have experienced the delights of a property, prospective guests can more easily imagine themselves having the same experience. Similarly, Hotel Generated Content is equally important. Hotels are more than beds and effective video presentations can tell a compelling story - a story about what makes the hotel appealing and unique. A video walk-through of rooms is essential, as are video tours in different areas of a hotel. The goal is to highlight what makes the property exceptional, but also to show real people having real fun - an experience that prospective guests can have too. The June Hotel Business Review will report on some of these issues and strategies, and examine how some sales and marketing professionals are integrating them into their operations.